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Sep 25, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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DTWE: 3 lambics to celebrate Zwanze Day 2017

September 22nd, 2017

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Cantillon Zwanze Day is this weekend, and the beer nerds are amped. Zwanze Day is Brasserie Cantillon’s salute to lambic and is marked by a worldwide toast of that year’s Zwanze beer. The Side Project Cellar hosts this sold-out celebration again this year, but you can still imbibe a glass of lambic around St. Louis and join in the international toast at 2 p.m.

Lambic beer is the spontaneously fermented, barrel-aged beauty from the Pajottenland region of Belgium, just southwest of Brussels where Cantillon is located. Breweries that specialize in this funky, wild product are highly regarded for their aging and blending techniques.

Although we don’t tend to see much in the U.S. due to the smaller batch size and delicate nature of the product, there are a few places in St. Louis that curate thoughtful bottle lists that often include lambic – some more rare than others.

If you’re looking to add a little funk and sour to your weekend, go explore the beer world for lambic and join this international recognition of tradition and beauty.

1. Lindemans Gueuze Cuvée René
This lambic is Champagne-like with incredible effervescence and bright flavors. Tart apples and funk resonate on the nose while sour grapes and tangerine dance on the palate. Friar Tuck, various locations

2. Tilquin Gueuze (and any fruited variants you can find)
A blend of one-, two- and three-year-old lambic, this mouthful is vibrant with notes of grain, barnyard, stone fruit and citrus zest. Its acidity is balanced, so it won’t leave your mouth watering after each sip. You can try one or all of the past four years of this complex brew at Hair of the Dog.
Hair of the Dog, Facebook: Hair of the Dog

3. St. Louis Fond Tradition Kriek
Wood, fruit and funky yeast undertones run deep with this one and are driven across the palate with a mild carbonation and pretty significant sour character. Ripe cherry and a hint of spice and earth steal the show as you continue drinking this delightfully refreshing beer.
Craft Beer Cellar, cbcclayton.com

Katie Herrera is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and account manager at Craft Republic.

Mike Randolph will open Privado in former Randolfi’s space

September 21st, 2017

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Mike Randolph is finally getting his experimental fine-dining restaurant. As The Scoop reported in late August, Randolph closed his Italian Randolfi’s at 6665 Delmar Blvd. earlier this month. He plans to open Privado in the same space in October.

“It is exciting,” Randolph said. “It took a little bit of time to just get over the hurt of Randolfi’s, but once we figured out what was possible and what we wanted to do, we kept coming back to this.”

Privado will be a fine-dining tasting menu restaurant open on Friday and Saturday evenings for one service of about 15 courses for just 16 patrons. Tickets for each dinner will be available online for $100 each. The first service is planned for Oct. 20.

“I’ve thrown a ton of things at the wall, but I’ve never given [fine-dining] a fair chance,” Randolph said. “We want to be in there two, three, four days a week experimenting, tweaking techniques, processing ingredients.”

He plans to design the space and experience – the plating, lighting, music, even the smell in the room – in ways that were impossible at his previous fine-dining projects (Little Country Gentleman and the Diversion Dinners series), since they took place in other, permanent establishments. “This is no longer a divergence from work – this is work,” Randolph said. “This is a singular focus.”

The bar will be open around weekend dinners, so customers can have a cocktail before or after their meal. A handful of snacks and desserts will be available for those who just want to pop in for a drink as they wait for a table at Público or wander in from The Loop – though reservations are encouraged for bar seats as well.

During the week, Privado will serve as a private event space, available for everything from baby showers to cooking demonstrations, and a kind of commissary kitchen that Randolph’s other restaurants can use when they need extra space. “This will give us a really flexible space,” he said. “We can do anything we need to do within the restaurant group out of that space.”

“We’re excited – that’s the long and the short of it,” Randolph said. “It’s switched from sorrow to excitement.”

 

Photo by Greg Rannells for Mike Randolph

Heather Hughes is managing editor at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Pig & Pickle in DeBaliviere

September 21st, 2017

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Chef-owner Ryan Lewis is putting the finishing touches on his new restaurant, Pig & Pickle, opening at 5511 Pershing Ave., on Friday, Sept. 29.

Those who’ve passed through Springfield, Illinois in recent years may have stopped at Lewis’ previous restaurant, Driftwood Eatery & Cocktail. As The Scoop reported in July, he decided to close the popular restaurant this summer and open an updated concept with a new name in St. Louis.

Lewis, who grew up across the Mississippi River in Bethalto, said the St. Louis market was a better fit for the type of food he wanted to do. He described Pig & Pickle as a “southern-inspired small plates restaurant” offering sharable dishes of veggies, meat and seafood with southern accents like buttermilk biscuits or pimento cheese.

The space that formerly housed Atlas Restaurant received a fresh coat of paint, new floors and barnwood shelving behind the bar. Lewis said he was attracted to the neighborhood’s residential density and hopes to fill the roughly 50 seats with area regulars.

Some Driftwood favorites like the fried chicken and biscuit and pretzel-crusted cheese curds have landed on Pig & Pickle’s menu, but Lewis said he’s looking forward to new items like a gremolata-style mushroom small plate and a charred octopus dish.

Lewis will continue relationships with several Illinois purveyors like Garden Gate, who produces his grits and cornmeal, but he’s also working with new area vendors like Ozark Forest Mushrooms and Theis Farms.

Once Pig & Pickle receives its liquor license, the bar program will feature house cocktails (Driftwood once boasted a 70-drink menu) and local brews on four taps and in 20 to 30 bottles and cans.

The restaurant will open with dinner service Tuesday to Saturday from 4:30 to 10 p.m. with Saturday and Sunday brunch soon to follow. Here’s a first look at what’s to come from Pig & Pickle:

 

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Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

September 21st, 2017

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At long last, Earthbound Beer’s new home is ready to welcome customers. The brewery and tasting room at 2724 Cherokee St., opens Saturday, Sept. 23.

The massive 2,500-square foot tasting room has been a project two years in the making. As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners and brewers Stuart Keating, Rebecca Schranz and Jeff Siddons announced they were moving from their flagship location down the street at 2710 Cherokee St. The space was less than 1,000 square feet and only allowed the brewers to make one beer at a time.

Eight old Earthbounds could fit into the new space that once housed part of Cherokee Street Brewing in the late 1800s. The tasting room seats around 80 on the first level and mezzanine, a feature designed by architecture and general contractor Nathan Dirnberger. The mezzanine appears to float above the tasting room thanks to railings made of tension wire and heavy-duty chains suspended from the 17-foot barrel ceilings.

Read more: Go underground at Earthbound Beer during construction

Behind the bar, 16 taps will pour Earthbound brews and a few guest taps, with another two nitro taps available. A small selection of spirits will be available (still no mixers or ice, the owners noted) with the potential for batch cocktails in the future. Earthbound patrons can now enjoy wine, too, with two reds, two whites and a rosé available by the glass.

Below the tasting room, a 7-barrel system will increase Earthbound’s production tenfold. The space also houses a canning line that will crank out 16-ounce four-packs of staple brews. Caves underneath neighbor 2720 Cherokee St. will allow for a barrel-aging program in the future.

As The Scoop reported in August, Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will helm the food program at Earthbound. The menu will feature smoked meats, sausages and sandwiches, though food won’t be available until November at the earliest.

Earthbound’s new location means new hours, too. It will be open Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from noon to midnight and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Here’s a first look at Earthbound Beer’s new home.

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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Recipe: Peach-Bourbon Milkshake

September 21st, 2017

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Boozy milkshakes are a fun, trendy dessert option. Peaches and bourbon are a great combination, and that left me with a fun “free” fifth ingredient to choose. Mint? Vanilla or almond extract? My decision was made for me when I realized the rock-hard peaches I picked up the previous day hadn’t quite achieved perfectly ripe lusciousness. I needed to coax out some flavor and juice, so I brought out the butter and sugar.

 I decided that if I was going to add butter to a milkshake (insert OMG emoji here), that I may as well go all in. That means this butter is browned, my dears, and it makes all the difference. If you’re catering to teetotaling friends or family members, the bourbon can be poured in after you make the shake.

Peach-Bourbon Milkshake
4 small or 2 large servings

2 large peaches or 3 medium peaches, ripe or just underripe
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
¼ cup brown sugar
5-6 scoops high-quality vanilla ice cream, plus more as needed
½ cup whole milk, plus more as needed
4 oz. bourbon

• Bring a medium saucepan filled with water to a rolling boil over high heat. Prepare an ice bath.
• Slice a small X into the bottom of the peaches with a sharp knife, then place them in the boiling water 45 seconds to 1 minute until the skin just starts to pull away from the X. Remove and immediately plunge them into the ice water bath. Starting at the X, peel the peaches, then pit, slice and set aside.
• Place the butter in a large skillet and melt over medium heat. Gently swirl the pan until the solids just start to turn brown and the butter smells nutty.
• Add the peaches and brown sugar and stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and saute the peaches 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is saucy. Remove from heat and let cool at least 30 minutes.
• In the pitcher of a blender, combine the peach mixture and all its sauce, ice cream, milk and bourbon. Cover and puree until completely blended, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add ice cream or milk to reach the desired consistency.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Crabcake Bites

September 21st, 2017

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Indulging in these decadent little crabcake bites immediately brings me back to my college days in New Orleans when the nights were long and the shellfish plentiful. Since then I’ve have this gnawing desire to fashion a batch of crispy, rich, restaurant-worthy crabcakes – minus any intimidating frills or overly elaborate cooking methods. The concoction I ended up with is a stripped down, no-nonsense version of a classic Baltimore-style crabcake that leans on high quality crab meat amplified by a handful of ingredients easily scrounged from the pantry.

These crowd pleasers are simply prepared on a gas grill in about the time it takes to drain a cold long neck. I suggest the gas grill for this one as the heat is easier to manage and distributes more evenly than charcoal. Most important, don’t skimp on the quality of the crabmeat. Cheap, lousy crab makes this entire exercise pointless. The best bang for your buck is with backfin lump (an 8-ounce package prepped and ready to roll set me back about $13), which contains big pieces of jumbo lump as well as smaller broken up pieces of the body meat.

 

Crabcake Bites
4 to 6 servings

½ cup mayonnaise, divided
½ beaten egg
1½ Tbsp. whole-grain Dijon mustard, divided
½ Tbsp. Worcestershire
1 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. lemon juice, divided
2 tsp. Old Bay Seasoning, divided
½ tsp. hot sauce
Dash paprika
8 oz. back fin or jumbo lump crabmeat, drained and picked over for shells
10 saltines, finely crushed
1 Tbsp. butter

Special equipment: Slotted grill pan

• In a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, egg mustard, Worcestershire, lemon juice, Old Bay, hot sauce and paprika. In a separate bowl, gently combine the crabmeat and cracker crumbs, then gently fold into the mayonnaise mixture. (Do not overwork the mixture.) Cover and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight.
• Prepare a gas grill for medium-high heat direct heat. Melt the butter on the grill pan and heat on the grill 5 minutes.
• Spoon out approximately 1 tablespoon crab mixture, forming each into about 12 golf ball-sized bites. Grill the crabcakes in the grill pan over direct heat 4 minutes. Flip and grill 4 minutes on the other side, until both sides are brown and crispy.
• Remove from the heat and allow them to rest 10 minutes before serving
• Meanwhile, whisk together the remaining ¼ cup mayonnaise, 1 tablespoon mustard, 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 1 teaspoon Old Bay in a small bowl until smooth. Serve as a dipping sauce with the crabcakes.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Matt Berkley is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who writes Grilled.

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CWE, Delmar Loop restaurants rally after damage to storefronts

September 20th, 2017

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In the wake of the not-guilty verdict against former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on Friday, Sept. 15, in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, demonstrators have protested the outcome around the city, including the Central West End and the Delmar Loop. The demonstrations were largely peaceful, but some vandalism of area businesses, including several restaurants, occurred after the protests ended.

Evangeline’s Bistro & Music House manager Maggie Gomez said two windows were damaged at the CWE restaurant on Friday night, but no one was injured as a result. “It was better than it could have been,” Gomez said. “When they (hit) the glass, the band was on stage playing. Glass got in the piano, and the musicians had to get off stage.”

Gomez said the windows are made from shatterproof glass and remained largely intact with just some holes, and the restaurant stayed open for the remainder of the night and opened for business as usual on Saturday. She said Friday’s verdict affected business in the area over the weekend, even before the protests.

“We had a slow weekend. We were dead because of everything,” Gomez said. “We’re doing our normal hours, but I don’t think it’s going to be the same down here for a couple of weeks.”

 

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Vandalism occurred on the Delmar Loop, as well. Several establishments along Delmar Boulevard, including Salt & Smoke, Three Kings Public House and Ranoush, had windows broken on Saturday night after the protests there ended. Salt & Smoke owner Tom Schmidt said the damage occurred at approximately 11 p.m., after the restaurant closed for the night.

“No broken bones, just broken glass,” he said. “We lost about five or six windows. It could have been worse.”

The community spent the next few days decorating the boarded up businesses. Photos on the Delmar Loop’s Facebook page show volunteers painting murals depicting positive messages. Salt & Smoke also posted photos of the community cleaning up broken glass around its storefront in the early hours of Sunday morning.

Schimidt said he was able to reopen Sunday morning, and business didn’t suffer. “Sundays are always pretty crazy here, and we were full pretty much all day,” he said.

Photos courtesy of Delmar Loop Facebook 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Hugo’s Pizzeria in Midtown

September 20th, 2017

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Restaurateur Dave Bailey’s latest venture, Hugo’s Pizzeria, opened doors today, Sept. 20, at 3135 Olive St., in Midtown, formerly home to The Good Pie.

As The Scoop reported in March, Hugo’s marks Bailey’s seventh restaurant concept in the St. Louis area. He named the pizzeria for his son.

The menu at Hugo’s is based around a variety of hand-tossed pizzas. Bailey said they are akin to Roman-style pies with a yeasty pillow-like dough. The pizza selection includes classics like pepperoni and sausage and a white pizza with bechamel, prosciutto and lemon zest topped with charred grapes. For an additional charge, diners can add house-made pepperoni in five varieties: beef, spicy beef, duck, Buffalo chicken or a vegan variant. Vegan cheese and gluten-free dough can be subbed in, too.

The menu also includes salads and shareable plates like meatballs or fresh mozzarella with garlic oil, black honey, toast and more of those charred grapes. On the beverage front, Hugo’s offers a small selection of cocktails, a wine list heavy on Italian varietals, plus approximately 25 beers on tap.

Hugo’s seats approximately 100 inside and also boasts a partially covered patio space. The interior’s centerpiece is an open kitchen, fronted by the bar, for pizza aficionados who want to see the action up close. Rough-hewn wooden tables with fresh flowers and colorful metal chairs soften exposed brick and concrete floors in the dining areas.

Hugo’s is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday, and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Here’s a first look at Bailey’s latest new project.

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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Edible Weekend: 3 more tasty events to indulge in this weekend

September 20th, 2017

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{ The BHive } 

 

Whether it’s a taste of Malaysia or a Taco-Rita, there are plenty of ways to fill up this weekend. Here are three more events for those who’re still peckish:

 

1. A Table in Provence
Enjoy five courses of fine food and French wines at Five Bistro at this Provencal wine dinner. Enjoy a tomato galette with a Domaine du Bagnol Cassis Blanc 2014 and beef short ribs with Chateau Pradeaux Bandol 2012. Call for reservations.
$80. Thu., Sept. 21 – 6:30 p.m., Five Bistro, 5100 Daggett Ave., St. Louis, 314.773.5553, fivebistro.com

2. Ferguson Farm Forum
Enjoy a free meal (donations welcome) of soup, salad and barbecue, then join from EarthDance Farm and others to discuss how to become empowered and engaged in the food system.
Free admission. Sun., Sept. 24 – 4 to 7 p.m., EarthDance, 233 S. Dade Ave., Ferguson, 314.521.1006, Facebook: Ferguson Farm Forum 

3. An Evening of Dinner and Cocktails
Grab a spot in The BHive when Vicia sous chef Alec Schingel and STLBarkeep Matt Longueville host dinner this Sunday. At least five courses will pair with tasting-sized cocktails. Tickets available online.
$70 to $100. Sun., Sept. 24 – 7 to 9 p.m., The BHive at Brennan’s, 4661 Maryland Ave., St. Louis, Facebook: STL Barkeep

Don’t miss out. Sign up for the Edible Weekend newsletter to get the best food events of the weekend delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

 

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

 

First Look: St. Louis Soup Dumplings in University City

September 19th, 2017

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St. Louis is home to dozens of Chinese restaurants, and this week, one more will join the ranks when St. Louis Soup Dumplings opens Friday, Sept. 22, at 8110 Olive Blvd., in University City.

The restaurant is the brainchild of Lawrence Chen and his wife, Emily Yang, who own Private Kitchen, located just two doors down at 8106 Olive Blvd.

As The Scoop reported in March, Chen said the inspiration for the new restaurant came from the popularity of the pork and crab soup dumplings served at Private Kitchen.

Those dumplings will now be available at St. Louis Soup Dumplings, along with fish, chicken, beef and shrimp and mozzarella versions. Chen said other fillings would likely be added in the future, including a veggie option.

A small selection of cold items, including salads, will be available in a refrigerated grab-and-go case near the counter, but Chen’s focus is squarely on the soup dumplings.

The minimalist interior has undergone extensive renovations and retains no hint of its former incarnation as a cell phone store. The space seats approximately 30 and features light wood, neutral colors and light fixtures resembling bamboo lanterns.

St. Louis Soup Dumplings will be open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Here’s a first look at what to expect from St. Louis’ first soup dumpling shop:

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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