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Nov 24, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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12 recipes to step up your Thanksgiving leftover game

November 22nd, 2017

Sometimes after your big Thanksgiving dinner, there’s still a basket of bread and a turkey leg left. Your fridge is still full, but you can only make so many sandwiches. Fear not! Here are a few recipes to use up those holiday leftovers – from the bird to that extra bag of cranberries to a can of pumpkin puree.

 

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For leftover turkey
1. Recipe: White Turkey Chili 

2. Recipe: Curried Turkey Waldorf Salad

3. Recipe: Leftover Turkey Cuban 

 

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For leftover cranberries
4. Recipe: Cranberry Tart

5. Recipe: Cranberry Beignets

6. Recipe: Cranberry-Fig Chutney 

 

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For leftover pumpkin
7. Recipe: Chocolate Chip-Pumpkin Bread 

8. Recipe: Pumpkin-Chocolate Chip Cookies

9. Recipe: Pumpkin Mousse Shortbread Bars 

 

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For leftover odds and ends
10. Recipe: Fried Brussels Sprouts Salad

11. Recipe: Day-Old Bread Soup 

12. Recipe: Croissant French Toast Casserole 

 

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• Big Rich Holiday

Season’s Brunchings

Sauce Gift Guide: $50 to $100

November 22nd, 2017

50-100

 

These are the gifts for loved ones with unparalleled taste. If they appreciate the glaze on a plate while out to dinner or notice the beauty in patinaed hardware, they’ll adore these five presents almost as much as they do you.

1. De Buyer Swing Plus Mandolin
Know a type A cook? Chances are you do. Give them the tool to make perfectly sliced cucumbers and julienned carrots, and save them the Xanax they needn’t take.
$100.
 Williams Sonoma, williams-sonoma.com

2. Fiesta Napkins
For the aesthetically minded designer host, we suggest Kim Seybert Fiesta Napkins. Pretty enough to frame for display, they feature shibori-style dye patterns and a bold, patterned edge.
Four-pack: $64. Sallie Home, salliehome.com



3. Springerle Cookie Molds
St. Louis’ German-French history comes with cherished food traditions: rolling out strudel dough or baking Old World cookies like the delicate, anise-flavored Springerle. These holiday cookie molds will be cherished by the family baker.
Prices vary.
 Springerle Joy, springerlejoy.com

4. Culinary Torch
Not just for putting the finishing touches on creme brulee. Sear perfect steaks, bubble cheese on lasagna or caramelize, well, anything. This is a chef’s tool of luxury.
$56. Kitchen Conservatory, kitchenconservatory.com

5. Kate Walter Hand-Painted Bowls or Platters
Local artist Kate Walter is churning out botanically inspired pottery based on her love of gardening. Gift these to someone who will cherish them enough to pass them along for generations.

Prices vary. Houska Gallery, houska.com

Maggie Pearson is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

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• Sauce Magazine: 2017 Guide to the Holidays

Sauce Gift Guide: $25 to $50

• Sauce Gift Guide: $25 or less

Sauce Gift Guide: $25 to $50

November 22nd, 2017

25-50

 

Foodies are the best people to buy for. With so many great products out there, it’s easy to find something they don’t already have in their kitchens. These five gifts scream thoughtfulness without scary price tags.

1. Boska Girolle Cheese Curler
For 800 years – from the time Swiss monks invented Tête de Moine to the 1980s when the country that brought us engineering invented the girolle – people used whatever they had to scrape the delicious, semi-hard cheese into paper-thin slices. Boska’s girolle makes easy work of shaving Tête de Moine into delightful curlicues, releasing its nutty aroma and complex flavor.
$50. Larder & Cupboard, larderandcupboard.com

2. Olive Oil Straight from Sparta
The Chronis family of St. Louis owns an olive grove in Greece. They control everything from cultivating and cold-pressing the Kalamata olives to bottling and selling the resulting extra-virgin olive oil – now at a retail boutique in St. Louis. Pick up a bottle of the Olea Gold oil and a packet of Greek wild herbs for a dipping sauce of the gods.
Olive oil: $20. Herbs: $5. Olea Estates, oleaestates.com

3. Olive wood Salt Box
Olive wood is as exotic and beautiful as it is hard and strong. It’s just what designer salt wants. With extraordinary, unique grain patterns, no two salt boxes are the same, making them the definition of a one-of-a-kind gift. And over time, the olive wood will take on a richer, darker, even more beautiful hue.
$50. Kitchen Conservatory, kitchenconservatory.com

4. Bubbly Liqueur Sets
Each set pairs a bottle of Italian sparkling wine with a liqueur for festive, bubbly cocktails perfect for holiday parties galore. Choose from four sets, including the classic Kir Royale made with crème de cassis and prosecco. Who doesn’t love bubbles?
$28 to $29. Vom Fass, vomfassusa.com

5. Bottle Snaps
When blacksmith Andrew Andrasko isn’t fabricating and forging large sculptures for parks, galleries and businesses, he can be found in his studio hammering out useful metal kitchen tools like ladles, spatulas, meat forks … and these cool bottle openers in three colors.
$28. NHB KnifeWorks, nhbknifeworks.com

Michael Renner is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who regularly pens New & Notable reviews

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• Sauce Magazine: 2017 Guide to the Holidays

Sauce Gift Guide: $25 or less

Sauce Gift Guide: $50 to $100

Sauce Gift Guide: $25 or less

November 22nd, 2017

25

When your coffers are dwindling but you’re still obligated, here are 12 creative and clever gifts for food and drink lovers that won’t pain your bank account or show up as next year’s re-gift.

 

1. Missouri State Cookie Cutter & Kitchens of the Great Midwest
Food-based fiction is a special mix rarely executed well. Give both the book and a little Missouri love to the local baker in your life.
Book: $16. Left Bank Books, left-bank.com; Cookie cutter: $5. Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods, lemongem.com

2. Facture Goods Brass Spoons
Anyone could use these gorgeous, handmade brass spoons sized for a salt cellar, coffee stirrer or even serving dishes.
$18 to $22. Bowood Farms, bowoodfarms.com

3. “Hold Me Closer Tony Danza” Tumbler
Getting adequately caffeinated before one leaves the house is a task many of us fail on the daily. Gift this to the friend that needs coffee to live – all of your friends.
$14.50. Phoenix Rising, shopphoenixrising.com

4. Collin Garrity Stick Vases
Handmade from beautiful woods that stand up to time and wear, these dainty lil’ vases will give anyone’s table an unique organic beauty.
$8 to $24. Urban Matter, urbanmatterstl.com

5. Firecracker Press STL Coasters
With these thick letterpressed coasters, there’s zero chance Granny’s Manhattan will sweat its way through to her burled wood table.
Four-pack: $12. Union Studio, stlunionstudio.com

Maggie Pearson is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

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Sauce Gift Guide: $25 to $50

Sauce Gift Guide: $50 to $100

4 big Black Friday beer events in St. Louis

November 22nd, 2017

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After the kitchen is clean and leftover turkey soup is simmering on the stove, seek relief from bargain shopping and imbibe at some of the beer-related events that break up the otherwise consumerist hell we call Black Friday.

In the beer world, Black Friday designates the highly anticipated release of Goose Island Bourbon County Stout. This massively rich, boozy, succulent Imperial stout paved the way for barrel aging in American craft beer today. People seek BCS and its variants all over the St. Louis area, and lines form for draft pours and bottles – sometimes immediately after dessert is devoured, as the lines are hours long (of course).

When Black Friday comes, there will be more than just BCS at your favorite local establishments, and there are some awesome events planned to highlight the essence of these gnarly, “probably-shouldn’t-have-eaten-that-pie” black beers.

1. Black Out Friday at Llywelyn’s in St. Charles
This bar not only taps 2015 and 2017 BCS, but it has also decided to throw on Perennial Artisan Ales’ heavy-hitting 2017 Imperial stouts: Abraxas, Fantastic Voyage and 17. Other fun big guys are slated to pour, too, starting at 11 a.m. This is your Black Friday event for big, fun adjuncts.

2. Winter Beer Release at International Tap House in Soulard
ITap pairs its BCS release with the tapping of more than a dozen seasonal holiday beers during this annual event starting at 11 a.m. Look for this year’s BCS and a variant, as well Boulevard Nutcracker Ale, Odell Isolation Ale and Schlafly Christmas Ale at this annual winter beer showcase.

3. Whiskey Scented Santa Release at Charleville Brewing Co. and Tavern
If you’re not feeling the BCS, but you still want big, dark beer, head to Charleville’s new home at 11 a.m. for the draft and bottle release of its barrel-aged Imperial stout, Whiskey Scented Santa. This guy is always a hit with a big whiskey aroma and some booze on the palate underlined by lovely, mellow notes of vanilla and dried fruit. It’s quite limited, so get there early.

4. Beer : Barrel : Time and Derivation Blend No. 8 at Side Project
Perhaps you’re one of the lucky ones who purchased a bottle of Side Project Brewing’s Beer : Barrel : Time 2017 before it sold out online. This blended, barrel-aged, no-adjunct Imperial stout is beautiful, complex and could be St. Louis’ newest Thanksgiving weekend beer tradition. If you missed your chance for a bottle, don’t worry. She is available to sip on-site at The Side Project Cellar and Side Project Brewing all weekend alongside Derivation Blend No. 8.

 

Katie Herrera is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and account manager at Craft Republic. 

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• Drink This Weekend Edition: Schlafly Barrel-Aged Imperial Stout

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Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream will open a second location in West County

November 22nd, 2017

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After a successful Maplewood opening in February, Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream is set to open a second location, this time near Valley Park.

As reported by St. Louis Magazine, owner Eric Moore said he will open the second Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream at 2901 Dougherty Ferry Road in February 2018 in the former home of frozen yogurt shop, Yo My Goodness. The new space will offer more seating and a similar menu to the flagship location: scoops of Serendipity ice cream sandwiched between house-made Belgian waffles, as well as individual waffles and ice cream by the scoop.

Growing up in New Jersey, Moore said he used to go to the boardwalk and order a waffle ice cream sandwich. “They’d throw frozen waffles in a toaster and then scoop some ice cream out of a tub,” said Moore. “I’m doing [that concept] on steroids; we make the waffles right in front of you, and customers get it fresh right in their hands.”

 

Fluffy Belgian waffles are made to order; customers can also order plain waffles and drizzle them with butter and maple syrup.

 

Customers at Boardwalk Waffles can order a quarter-, half- or full-waffle sandwich with one to four scoops of any 16 Serendipity ice cream flavors. Seasonal waffles, like the current pumpkin waffle, are also available, with an upcoming winter red velvet waffle in the works.

At the Boardwalk Waffles’ Valley Park location, Moore noted a few updates were being made to the space, and how the additional seating allowed for some possible menu variations. He also said they plan on having live music on the weekends on the space’s patio. “We might extend hours to breakfast and just serve waffles then,” he said.

Moore also plans to launch at least one Boardwalk food truck in the spring, and a third brick-and-mortar location in Fayetteville, Georgia, also in February. Other locations are in development, including a spot in Peachtree City, Georgia, and Moore is working on getting Serendipity distributed out of state. “I have a goal,” said Moore. “Fifteen [locations] in St. Louis and 15 in Georgia, along with food trucks. From there, who knows?”

 

Photos by Michelle Volanksy 

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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• First Look: Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream in Maplewood

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First Look: Knead Bakehouse & Provisions on South Hampton

November 22nd, 2017

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Knead Bakehouse & Provisions is officially open for business at 3467 Hampton Ave. Owners AJ and Kirsten Brown opened doors at their bread bakery and cafe on Nov. 18.

As The Scoop reported in September, Knead bread got its start selling bread at farmers markets in St. Charles County before the Browns signed a lease on the former Salume Beddu space.

Knead currently offers two types of bread in whole loaves: a flagship rustic sourdough loaf and a brioche. The grain is sourced from the Missouri Grain Project, Great Harvest of Montana and Heartland Mills from neighboring Kansas.

The naturally leavened loaves use only water, flour, sea salt and a sourdough starter to begin. “When you have only four ingredients, you can’t really hide behind poor quality of those ingredients, so we have to get the best ingredients for that bread,” AJ Brown said.

While bread is the focus of Knead, the 25-seat cafe also serves breakfast and lunch. Doughnuts, morning buns and pastries are available alongside tea and Blueprint coffee in the morning. Sandwiches, salads and soups take over the menu midday. House-made botanical sodas with fresh herbs are offered as well.

Although Brown said in the future, customers can expect Knead bread mixes, house-made jams and butters for sale. Kolache will also eventually appear on the counter, as the Brown family has Czechoslovakian roots.

Brown said the goal of Knead is to revive American bread culture, and the bakery will offer goods that Americans are familiar with. “[You] don’t have to be a bread connoisseur,” Brown said.

Regular business hours for Knead Bakehouse & Provisions are 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Here’s a first look at what to expect from St. Louis’ newest bread bakery:

 

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Photos by Caitlin Lally 

Caitlin Lally is a contributing writer to Sauce Magazine. 

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Recipe: Cranberry Beignets

November 22nd, 2017

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Let’s face it: Everyone has cranberry sauce leftover after a Thanksgiving meal. You’d notice if it was missing from the table, but there’s only so much you can take of its sweet-tartness when the rest of your plate is piled high with comfort food. So what to do with the extra sauce? I’m here to help.

I intended to make jelly doughnuts, but I couldn’t find my round cookie cutter, so I had to use my square one instead. To my surprise, the only difference between beignets and doughnuts are their shape … so I made beignets!

Jelly-filled beignets can be made the night before and refrigerated to rise overnight, or you can start them earlier in the morning in time for a late weekend brunch. They are adaptable; swap the citrus zest for a teaspoon of vanilla or almond extract. Fill them with leftover cranberry sauce, toss them in sugar and serve immediately to people you love.

 

Cranberry Beignets
Adapted from a recipe at Smitten Kitchen 
8 to 10 servings

3 oz. lukewarm milk
2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1¼ tsp. active dry yeast
1 egg yolk
Zest of half a lemon or orange
1 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 cup plus 2½ Tsbp. all-purpose flour
Pinch of kosher salt
Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
½ cup cranberry sauce
Powdered sugar to coat

• Mix the milk, sugar and yeast in a large bowl and let sit for 5 minutes, until starts to foam.
• Whisk in the yolk, zest and butter until combined. Add the flour and the salt, then mix with your hands to bring the dough together into a sticky ball. Transfer it to a well-oiled mixing bowl and let rise in a dark corner about 1 hour.
• On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough about 2 inches thick. Use a square cookie cutter or sharp knife to cut 2-by-2-inch squares and place on a cookie sheet. Cover with oiled plastic wrap and let rise in a dark corner 2 to 4 hours or refrigerate overnight.
• In a large high-sided pan, preheat 2 inches oil to 350 degrees over medium heat. If you don’t have a thermometer, check if the oil is ready by placing a wooden spoon handle into the hot oil. When bubbles form around it, the oil is ready.
• Working in batches, fry 3 to 4 beignets about 30 seconds to 1 minute, the carefully flip and fry another 30 seconds to 1 minute, until browned all over. Use a spider to remove the doughnuts and drain on a paper-towel lined plate and let cool. Repeat with the remaining dough.
• Fill a piping bag fitted with a round nozzle with cranberry sauce. Poke a hole into the side the doughnuts with the nozzle, then gently fill with cranberry sauce until a bit of jam sticks out.
• Serve immediately covered in sifted powdered sugar.

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who blogs at A Song in Motion

Related Content
• Recipe: Leftover Cranberry Tart

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Planter’s House owners will open Small Change in Benton Park

November 21st, 2017

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 { from left, Ted Charak, Jamie Kilgore and Ted Kilgore }

Big news for cocktail aficionados: Planter’s House owners Ted Kilgore, Jamie Kilgore and Ted Charak will open their second bar, Small Change, in mid-January at 2800 Indiana Ave., in Benton Park.

More minimal than Planter’s House, Ted Kilgore said Small Change, named after a Tom Waits tune, will feature canned and draft beer, a small selection of spirits and a tight menu of five to six rotating cocktails, along with some bartender’s choice specials. There won’t be a formal menu per se, just a chalkboard with the day’s featured drinks.

“We’ll still have quality ice and fresh juices and some geeky stuff, but also beers and shots of quality whiskey that won’t break the bank,” Kilgore said.

Small Change won’t have a kitchen, though there will be vending machine and a microwave on hand for those who crave some low-brow, late-night eats. “Think truck-stop sandwiches and noodle bowls, some healthy stuff, and some not-so-healthy stuff,” Kilgore said.

The trio intends for Small Change to be a neighborhood joint where guests can unwind without pressure or pretense. “The space is comfortable and laid back,” he said. “It’s similar to Planter’s House, where it feels like it could’ve been around for a while or brand-new at the same time.”

The “hobo chic” interior, which seats 49, includes repurposed chairs, tables and doors. The ancient Falstaff sign outside above the entrance, though, will eventually be replaced with the Small Change logo.

Planter’s House vet Harrison Massie will helm Small Change, and Sam McCulloch, who has previously worked at Cleveland-Heath and Niche Restaurant Group, will serve as assistant bar manager. The space will be open Sunday through Thursday from 4 p.m. to midnight and Saturday from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.

 

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The Kilgores and Charak are warming up the space Friday, Nov. 24 when Miracle, the Christmas-themed pop-up cocktail bar franchise, returns with a few changes. This year, Miracle will remain open through Dec. 31 (the last day of service in 2016 was Christmas Eve), only closing on Christmas Day.

Reservations will also be available this year via Tock, and bar seats and standing room will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Miracle will be open from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Saturday, and 4 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Kilgore said Miracle is also partnering with Tom’s Town Distillery. A portion of the sales of drinks featuring Tom’s Town gin and vodka will support Santa’s Helpers, an area nonprofit that assists families in need.

Owners photo by Michelle Volansky, Miracle photo courtesy of Jamie Kilgore

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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Sommelier Andrey Ivanov will leave Reeds American Table at the end of the year

November 20th, 2017

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A pillar of the St. Louis wine scene will soon leave for the West Coast. Andrey Ivanov, executive beverage director at Reeds American Table, will relocate to San Francisco at the end of the year to further his position as national sales manager for Bliss Wine Imports, which is based in Napa Valley, California. He’ll remain at Reed’s through Tuesday, Dec. 26.

Ivanov, who has worked with Bliss for about two years, said it no longer makes sense for him to be based in St. Louis and fly to the company’s largest market eight or nine times a year.

“It’s kind of a bummer, because I wanted to pass my master sommelier [exam] here and not leave the community,” Ivanov said. “But my long-term plan and passion is to import wine and be on that side of it.”

The advanced sommelier has been a leader in the St. Louis community of wine professionals. He made a name for himself at Elaia, Olio, 33 Wine Bar and Brasserie, before he stepped into the role of beverage director at Reeds American Table before it opened in 2015 and has earned national recognition for his wine expertise.

Reeds chef-owner Matthew Daughaday said Ivanov’s contributions to the Maplewood restaurant were invaluable.

“I couldn’t have asked for someone better to work with over the past few years in terms of what he’s done building the program here,” Daughaday said. “He’s always been really good at bringing up the next young somm. I feel lucky to have him for the time that we did, knowing that he has his pick of what he wants to do.”

Ivanov said he’s leaving the wine program at Reeds in the capable hands of beverage director Alisha Blackwell-Calvert and her team.

“Alisha has been beverage director for quite a few months now, so she’s going to take over even more of the program,” he said. “We still have a total of three sommeliers who work at Reeds, there’s always at least one of them on the floor during every shift, so Reeds is in a good place.”

Photo by Ashley Gieseking

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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