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Nov 24, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Holiday Hacks: Batch the booze and head to Austria

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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Avoid playing bartender all night and choose one great cocktail or punch to serve alongside beer and wine. No time to batch? Planter’s House offers bottled Manhattans, Negronis and more, mixed and ready to go.

For the perfect bottle of wine, look to Austria, which is turning out some amazing medium-bodied, food-friendly reds perfect for the holidays. Sommelier Patricia Wamhoff of Lile Wines recommended Straka Blaufränkisch, available at Reeds American Table. 

“It has bright fruit flavors with good acidity and medium body. The tannins are moderate, and therefore it works well with a number of items from stuffing to the candied yams,” she said. “It’s a great crowd pleaser.”

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and Dierbergs culinary creative director. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• 3 quick and easy holiday starters to keep your guests at bay

• 7 recipes to help you host the holidays with the most

4 recipes to step up your holiday side game

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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Whether you want to take your meal to the next level or need to win the it’s-not-a-competition potluck, sides like spiced carrots, roast broccoli and slow-cooker mashed potatoes have you covered.

1. Recipe: Slow-Cooker Mashed Potatoes

2. Recipe: Vegan Creamed Spinach

3. Roast Broccoli with Kalamata Olives

4. Spiced Carrots with Carrot Top Gremolata

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and Dierbergs culinary creative director. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• 3 quick and easy holiday starters to keep your guests at bay

• Holiday Hacks: Outsource the dessert

7 recipes to help you host the holidays with the most

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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Rocking the kitchen choreography is only one part of great hospitality. Having something for everyone can be effortless with recipes like decadent kosher short ribs, vegetarian wild mushroom lasagna and vegan creamed spinach (the secret is silken tofu – no one needs to know). Bonus: all can be made up to two days ahead.

But even when you’re cooking all week, finding the time and space to make your dream menu can be a big problem. For a stress-free holiday, free up your stovetop and save that premium oven space with recipes like slow-cooker mashed potatoes and by using your grill (set to low) to keep dishes warm. You’ve got this.

1. Recipe: Hot and Fast Roast Turkey

2. Recipe: Braised Short Ribs with Horseradish 

3. Recipe: Wild Mushroom Lasagna 

4. Recipe: Slow-Cooker Mashed Potatoes

5. Recipe: Vegan Creamed Spinach

6. Roast Broccoli with Kalamata Olives

7. Spiced Carrots with Carrot Top Gremolata

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and Dierbergs culinary creative director. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• 3 quick and easy holiday starters to keep your guests at bay

• Holiday Hacks: Outsource the dessert

Holiday Hacks: Outsource the dessert

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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Host smarter, not harder. Dessert is one of the easiest things to outsource for the holidays.

Pick up favorites like pecan pie from Sugaree Baking Co., or opt for classics reimagined by the elaborate French pastry wizards at Nathaniel Reid Bakery (like the ones pictured here).

If you’re on the fence of the great pie-cake debate, have it all with the Pake from La Patisserie Chouquette, a cake/pie hybrid that layers toasted buttercream between eggnog cheesecake, spice cake, pumpkin pie and bourbon-pecan pie.

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and Dierbergs culinary creative director. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• 3 quick and easy holiday starters to keep your guests at bay

• 7 recipes to help you host the holidays with the most

3 quick and easy holiday starters to keep your guests at bay

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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First impressions matter, but they don’t have to be painful. Pick just a couple show-stopping, low-effort appetizers and fill in the gaps with easy cocktail party fare like bruschetta and a charcuterie board so you can start big and still focus on killing it with the rest of the meal. These fast, simple snacks take minimal effort for maximum flavor.

Scatter your snacks in more than one place and dish them out in batches throughout the evening. Snack-designated gathering spots prevent bottlenecks in a crowded kitchen, and timing is everything if you want to keep your drinking guests from donning a lampshade because you ran out of food.

1. Recipe: Spiced Mixed Nuts

2. Recipe: Roasted Artichokes with Garlic Aioli

3. Recipe: Spicy Bacon Caramel Corn

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and Dierbergs culinary creative director.

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to the Holidays 2017

• Holiday Hacks: Outsource the dessert

• 7 recipes to help you host the holidays with the most

A butcher’s daughter reflects on her father’s culinary legacy

Friday, September 8th, 2017

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{ Marianne Moore with her father’s knives }

White paper, twine and knives. Some of the earliest memories I have of my dad are of white paper and twine and knives. Not the standard perhaps, but as a butcher’s daughter, it was a normal part of life for me.

When I was very young, my dad, Joe Kroupa, worked in a small grocery/meat market. He would come home from work with all kinds of meat – pork chops, steaks, braunschweiger, sausages – beautifully wrapped and perfectly tied. Even after he retired, he continued to trim the meat he bought at home, rewrap it with that white paper, tie it, label it and stack it in the freezer.

He was a butcher – that’s what he knew.

I’d see him in the kitchen, prepping some kind of roast, tenderloin or ham. Trimming, cutting, using his palms and fingers, the knife gliding through, then grabbing his twine to truss or tie, making those perfect little knots. On Thanksgiving, he carved the turkey like a surgeon, making just the right cut. Precise. Deliberate. Every move so effortless. The knife was an extension of his hand, and his skills were incredible.

For many years, he processed deer in our garage for friends during hunting season. It was fascinating to watch, but I didn’t think much about it until many years later. In my first week of culinary school, the chef gave us tasks to assess our skill level. Once, he handed me a beef tenderloin and asked me to get it ready for the oven. Without a second thought, I grabbed a cutting board, my knives and some twine, and I got to work.

I trimmed the chain, the silver skin, tucked the tail and tied it with butchers twine, just as I had seen my dad do for so many years. When the chef came to check my work, he fully expected to see a mangled tenderloin, rather than the one in front of him: perfectly prepped, seasoned and ready for the oven. He asked where I learned to do that. “Easy,” I said. “My dad was a butcher – I guess I paid attention.”

As I went through culinary school, my dad and I talked a bit about what I was doing, but we never cut meat together or really hung out in the kitchen. It wasn’t until a few years ago when I connected with Chris McKenzie of Mac’s Local Eats. He was sourcing meat for a small group that wanted to buy local grass-fed beef or local farm-raised pork. I remember my dad and me driving with McKenzie, coolers in the back, to pick up beef from a processor in Jackson, Missouri. We took a tour of the plant, and I watched my dad talk to the guys. Of course, since he was there, he had them cut meat to his specs. It gave me a view into his world, told me a bit more about who he was.

About a year later, a few chefs and I got together and bought a couple of pigs from a local farmer. “What are you going to do with that now?,” my husband asked in a bit of a panic on our way home. I smiled as I grabbed my phone. I told my dad to grab his knives and meet me at my house – I had a little project and needed his help. When he walked in and saw that pig on the kitchen island, his eyes lit up. We spent the whole afternoon breaking it down in my little kitchen. That day, something in our relationship shifted. I think we both realized how alike we were.

After that, we spent more time in the kitchen. We’d get together on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon and make sausage. He would come over with the pork perfectly cut, and we’d play around with spices until the mix was just perfect. I was always on the grinder, and he was right there next to me, working his magic with the casing – getting in just the right amount of filling and making flawless links. Those days helped me realize I had been out of the kitchen too long. I was working in catering and events at the time, and during those moments with my dad, I knew I needed to do something, anything, to get cooking again. It’s what motivated me to take that leap and join Dierbergs Markets as culinary creative director. I think it made him happy to see I was back in the kitchen – teaching, writing recipes and sharing my love of food.

My dad passed away earlier this year, and I am so grateful to have spent that time cooking, talking and learning with him. It got me back in the kitchen, but it also made me realize that as much as I wanted my dad to be proud of me, he wanted me to be proud of who he was, too. I will always be proud to be the butcher’s daughter.

 

Related Content
• Recipe: Cider-glazed Pork Roast

• Recipe: Grandma’s Potato Dumplings

• Recipe: Sweet and Sour Red Cabbage

• Recipe: Italian Sausage

• Recipe: Bratwurst

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and culinary creative director at Dierbergs Markets. 

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