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Apr 26, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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First Look: Patois in downtown St. Louis

Friday, April 21st, 2017

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Caribbean-American-inspired Patois Eatery & Social Lounge is now open at 2617 Washington Ave.

As The Scoop reported in April, the space retains the same ownership as its former incarnation, The Rustic Goat, but the management and direction of the restaurant have changed, according to marketing director Johnnie Franklin. The massive two-level space seats around 200 guests with small lounges available for private parties.

Helmed by head chef Carmen Harris, the open kitchen features tried-and-true jerk recipes from Chicago-based Jamaican restaurant, Uncle Joe’s Jerk. Chicken, catfish and shrimp are all offered as jerk preparations. A selection of small plates including pizza-like flatbreads and tacos are also available. Behind the bar, general manager Crystal Burkley has created a dozen or so house cocktails and offers a selection of national-label beers and a few wines by the glass.

Franklin intends to host several themed nights to attract nearby businesses and make use of the performance space in the center of the restaurant. Look for weekly music and drink specials like a reggae-themed happy hour and R&B and soul Saturdays.

Patois is open for lunch Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and for dinner Tuesday to Thursday from 5 to 11 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 5 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Sunday brunch service takes place 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here’s a first look at Patois:

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
The Scoop: Patois to open in former Rustic Goat space downtown

The Scoop: Brick River Cider, St. Louis’ first cidery, to open downtown

Sneak Peek: The Sliced Pint in downtown St. Louis

What I Do: Patrick Olds of Louie’s Wine Dive

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

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In 2010, Patrick Olds was contemplating going to law school while serving at the Four Seasons, with wine knowledge limited to the color of the liquid in the bottle. The 27-year-old beverage director and general manager of Louie’s Wine Dive has learned a few things since then. After countless hours studying for his advanced sommelier certification, a rigorous exam that focuses on theory, blind tasting and serving some of the best in the business, Olds passed in March. Here, Clayton’s wine prodigy shares his thoughts on tasting, testing and the can’t-miss glass on Louie’s ever-changing wine board.

Learning Curve
“My parents never drank wine growing up. When I first started at the Four Seasons, I didn’t know the difference between riesling and merlot.”

Tasting 101
“The best way to tell the quality of a wine is to swish it around in your mouth like mouthwash – really get it in every avenue – then swallow it and tell me what you think.”

Bipolar
“When you go six-for-six, there’s nothing really that tops that amount of euphoria: You just blind-tasted six wines in 25 minutes, and you nailed them. But if you go one out of six, there’s nothing that will bring you down faster. It’s a little polarizing.”

Song and Dance
“If you’re a trial lawyer, you’re up and performing the way that you may be in service situations. I feel like I’m a decent performer. I feel like I do well in those situations. In addition, all those things that you learn – all the laws throughout Missouri and federal laws – I’m learning laws in different languages from around the world. The only thing that’s really different is that part of my test is drinking wine.”

Next-level Service
“I went to Sepia [in Chicago]. … Everything about the dining experience was exquisite. … If a server is doing their job at a high level, their head is on a swivel and they’re looking around all the time, so they’ll see people looking up. Immediately, I was always approached. Drinks were never empty, water was never empty, the table was spotless. It was just pristine.”

Insider Tip
“I will always have a GC riesling up on the board – GC means grand cru. Those don’t sell as much, but anyone that gets a glass of that, they’re always so amazed. … If I ever have a chance to drink anything really special, it’s GC riesling. It’s a sommelier’s dream.”

Photo by Ashley Gieseking

Related Content

The Scoop: Louie’s Wine Dive to open location in Clayton

Reviews: Louie’s Wine Dive

Super Somms: St. Louis’ top wine students prepare to hold court

First Look: Polite Society in Lafayette Square

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

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Polite Society quietly opened in the in Lafayette Square at 1923 Park Ave. on March 23. As The Scoop reported in October 2016, co-owners Jonathan Schoen and Brian Schmitz have spent nearly a year renovating the former home of Ricardo’s, which closed in 2015 after 26 years in business.

Schoen and Schmitz met in the late ’90s as servers at Bar Italia. Since then Schoen opened Savor in the Central West End, as well as restaurants at The Cheshire, while Schmitz opened The Grind coffee house and Sol Lounge. When the 3,000-square-foot space on Park Avenue became available, they leapt at the chance to open a restaurant together.

The co-owners collaborated with executive chef Thomas Futrell, most recently of Scape, to create a menu of appetizers, snacks, salads and entrees that can easily accommodate palates and dietary preferences from all-consuming omnivores to gluten-intolerant vegans. Entrees include a duck breast, a mushroom raviolo and a crispy tofu and riced cauliflower stir-fry.

Another Scape alum, Travis Hebrank, helms the beverage program. With a year to experiment, he created an extensive portfolio of syrups, tinctures and infusions that feature in 10 house cocktails. Around 20 wines are available by the glass, and an extensive cellar is available by the bottle. There is also a curated bottled beer selection.

Brunch and lunch plans are the works, but for now, Polite Society is open daily from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., with dinner service ending at 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 9 p.m. Sunday. Here’s a first look at what to expect at Lafayette Square’s newest eatery:

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Related Content
The Scoop: Details emerge as Polite Society plans on late 2016 opening

The Scoop: Ricardo’s closes in Lafayette Square

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

From our new issue to a new arcade bar coming to the CWE, here’s what went down last week in the St. Louis restaurant scene, ICYMI…

 

 
1. Our March issue featuring our annual Guide to Beer hit stands this week; don’t wait! Click above to read online now!

2. Chocolate Chocolate Chocolate Co. is closing its Lake Forest Chocolates storefront at 7801 Clayton Road in Clayton. Co-owner and second-generation chocolatier Dan Abel, Jr. said the tentative closing date will be Saturday, March 11.

 

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3. Arcade bar Up-Down has signed a lease on the space at 405 N. Euclid Ave., in the Central West End. Up-Down will open in the former home of Herbie’s, which moved to 8100 Maryland Ave., in Clayton late last year.

4. Tazé Mediterranean Street Food is taking its fast-casual concept to the Central West End. Co-owners Casey and Justin Roth will open a second location at 8½ S. Euclid Ave., in the space formerly occupied by Tortillaria Mexican Kitchen.

 

Eat This: Turkey Sandwich at Nathaniel Reid Bakery

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Trust acclaimed pastry chef Nathaniel Reid to elevate the humble turkey sandwich far beyond a workaday lunch. His flaky, buttery croissant is sturdy enough to support slices of smoked turkey breast, a slice or two of havarti and a creamy swath of mayonnaise and mustard. We’ll never brown-bag a sad turkey sammie again.

Nathaniel Reid Bakery, 11243 Manchester Road, Kirkwood, 314.858.1019, nrbakery.com

Photo by Brendan Moloney

Guide to Beer 2017: Whale Hunting

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Beer nerds spend hours at bottle shops and grocery stores searching for new and trendy bottles to add to their collections. But some beers are so special, so elusive, they can make even the most mild-mannered beer enthusiast go Captain Ahab on local aisles. “The more rare or difficult it is to find, that’s what people refer to as a whale,” explained Ryan Nickelson, co-owner of Craft Beer Cellar. While Nickelson’s Clayton shop is stocked with brews from around the world, he sometimes receives just one case of a rare bottle. Here, Nickelson shared four tips for intrepid drinkers hell-bent on finding their own white whales.

1. Join the club. Many bottle shops have membership programs that reward participants with rare beers through raffles, special events and even allocations. Craft Beer Cellar also keeps some rare bottles on a cellar list for on-site consumption, so many can get a taste.

2. Follow the distributors, not just the beer. Distributors like Shelton Brothers will sometimes drop hints of what’s coming to the market. Nickelson also named beer blogs like The Beer Temple and Good Beer Hunting as prime resources.

3. Go to beer releases. Here is where you’ll find local whales highly coveted across the country, like Perennial Barrel-Aged Sump and Side Project Brewing bottles.

 4. Shop frequently. Nickelson said whales are sometimes announced with little fanfare. Successful hunters have sharp eyes.

 

If you stumble across these brews in stores, don’t think – just buy:

4 Hands Madagascar

Goose Island Rare Bourbon County Brand Stout

Cantillion Brewery beers

Firestone Walker Brewing Co. Proprietor’s Vintage Series

Avery Brewing Co. Barrel-Aged Series

Stone Brewing Small Batch Series

Illustration by Vidhya Nagarajan

Related Content
Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2017

Guide to Beer 2017: Fresh to Death

Guide to Beer 2017: Spring Forecast

 

Guide to Beer 2017: Fresh to Death

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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It happened again. You let that half-empty jug of milk sit past its best-by date. Way past its best-by date. You remove the cap, take a cautious sniff … then retch and promptly chuck the whole thing in the trash.

While old beer doesn’t produce quite the same visceral reaction, bottling or drink-by dates should be given the same consideration. If you’ve ever ordered a beer you thought you liked and found it unexpectedly flat or nasty, you’re familiar with the concept. Discovering you’re sipping a skunky lager or hop-less IPA is as disheartening to the brewer as it is to the consumer, according to 4 Hands brewery manager Martin Toft.

“After (the drink-by date), the beer isn’t going to be bad for you or unsafe to drink, it’s just not going to be the same beer that we want the consumers to drink,” Toft said.

That IPA you saved for a special occasion? Celebrate soon. In general, hoppy beers like IPAs and American pale ales should be consumed as soon as possible and definitely within two to three months.

“Those really bright, vibrant hop aromas will fall off, and it can start to get cardboard-y, sometimes kind of cheesy is another descriptor for old hops – a lot of really unpleasant flavors and aromas,” Toft said. “All those really pungent, citrusy, fruity, tropical flavors and aromas you find in IPAs, those are the ones that fall off the fastest.”

Less hop-forward styles with lower ABVs like Pilsners and blond ales can hold out a little longer, Toft said, but no more than six months. Sours and robust, high-gravity stouts can cellar quite nicely for years in the right conditions, but be warned – you may lose delicate flavor notes like vanilla and coffee.

“There are a lot of beers that cellar well, which means that they aren’t going to age as rapidly as other styles, but we put that beer in package because we wanted you to drink it right away,” Toft said.

Bottom line: Drink up. “If it’s in that bottle, it’s in there for a reason.”

 

Related Content
Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2017

Guide to Beer 2017: One Glass to Rule Them All

Guide to Beer 2017: Get festive with STL beer fests

Sneak Peek: Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream in Maplewood

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

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The scent of fresh-made waffles will soon waft down Manchester Road in Maplewood when Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream opens doors this Saturday, Feb. 4. As The Scoop reported in October 2015, owners Eric and Laurie Moore sought to bring a taste of Eric Moore’s childhood summers on the Jersey shore to Maplewood.

The narrow space briefly housed a second location of I Scream Cakes, but doors closed just a few months after that establishment opened. Since it was already designed to function as a scoop shop, the Moores made mostly cosmetic changes to the shop, including a fresh coat of paint and resurfaced floors.

Boardwalk’s menu features scoops of Serendipity ice cream sandwiched between fluffy made-to-order Belgian waffles. Customers can choose from a full order – two waffles and four scoops – or a modest single-scoop pressed between a waffle half. They can also forgo the waffle all together and simply enjoy a scoop or two in a cup, or indulge in breakfast for dessert with a plain waffle drizzled with syrup and butter.

Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream will be open Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect when the waffle irons heat up on Saturday:

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky

Related Content
The Scoop: Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream headed to Maplewood

The Scoop: Serendipity owner, business partner purchase The Fire & Ice Cream Truck

10 to Try: The best house-made scoops of summer

What I Do: Meredith and Rick Schaper of Dogtown Pizza

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

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Rick and Meredith Schaper had big plans in 2006: open a pizzeria serving St. Louis-style pies. But when the economy started to decline, the Schapers had to try another strategy. Today, more than 300 retailers carry frozen Dogtown Pizza, each handmade and flash-frozen at their warehouse in North City. Here, the Schapers tell how their business thrived in a tanking economy – and why they’ll never move to West County.

The Early Years
“The only pizza I had until I was 14 was Imo’s. My first sleepover, we had Domino’s with pepperoni, and I didn’t know what either one of them was. For us, [pizza] was a special occasion. We went and sat at Imo’s – we didn’t even get carryout.” – M.S.

“The real core of me is Farotto’s Pizza in Rock Hill. I started there when I was 11 and worked there until I was 21, so I had 10 years in a pizzeria. Literally, you’re at the most influential stage of your life from 11 to 21. That was my life. I didn’t think I’d do anything but work at that place. I was already the kid that hung out with my mom in the kitchen. [There are] stories of me on a stool, licking the strings off the roast beef.” – R.S. 

A Rough Start
“We invited some investors and tried to throw a party to raise money for a restaurant, and we got zero dollars. … It was right when [the economy] was crumbling. In our first year being in the frozen business, restaurants closed left and right. … The good fluke was people stopped going out to eat and grocery shopped more, and that’s where we were – in the grocery stores.” – R.S.

“Talk about trial and error. The first batch of labels weren’t coded so that the ink wouldn’t run in the freezer. We didn’t know to tell [the printer] that. When we said we were putting it on a pizza, we thought they knew!” – M.S.

Dogtown or Die
“Everybody asks, ‘When are you moving out to Chesterfield?’ Never – I’m staying in my nice cozy brick home in Dogtown. … My parents met and dated in Dogtown. My mom grew up and went to grade school at St. James the Greater and got married at St. James the Greater in the ’50s, and our first house is on the same street as my parents’ first house. … It’s still in the city, it’s close to everything, and the community and people are just tight-knit.” – R.S.

Long Live Pepperoni
“I hate plain cheese pizza. I hate my own cheese pizza. It just feels like it’s unfinished. It makes no sense to me.” – R.S.

“It’s like ordering a Jack and Coke and getting a glass of ice.” – M.S.

Dogtown Pizzeria?
“There’s a really strong fire inside me that still wants [to open a restaurant] because I enjoyed it, but then I go back to the risk of restaurants, the hours, the toll on your body and I say no way. … I’m not saying I couldn’t make it work – of course, in my mind I know I could – but there’s still a risk.”– R.S.

Photo by Kat Niehaus

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: February 2017

The Scoop: Dogtown Pizza to move operations to support “serious growth”

 

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

Monday, January 30th, 2017

From national recognition of a hometown staple to the opening of new St. Peters chop house, here’s what went down last week, ICYMI…

 

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1. The James Beard Foundation has announced the five recipients of its 2017 America’s Classics award, and one of St. Louis’ longtime favorites has landed on the list. Gioia’s Deli is the first St. Louis restaurant to receive the honor since the award’s inception in 1998.

2. The annual Good Food Awards were announced Jan. 20, and area chocolatier Kakao Chocolate has earned top honors in the confections category with its Norton Pâtés du Vin, a fruit gel made with Augusta Winery’s Norton.

 

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3. Cork & Barrel Chop House and Spirits opened doors with brunch service this Sunday, Jan. 29. As The Scoop reported in June, the 7,000-square-foot restaurant is located at 7337 Mexico Road.

4. White Rooster Farmhouse Brewery is set to start brewing in Sparta, Illinois, in the near future. Co-owner Mike Deutschmann said the brewery should be up and running at 113 W. Jackson St., this spring.

 

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5. New Day Gluten Free has a new home in Clayton. After closing their Ellisville location three months ago, co-owners Garrett and Kelly Beck have reopened their gluten-free, peanut-free restaurant and bakery at 7807 Clayton Road on Monday, Jan. 16.

6. Arlene Maminta Browne and Stanley Browne have announced their first non-Robust Wine Bar concept: Snax Gastrobar, set to open in early March.

 

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7. Giovanni’s On The Hill at 5201 Shaw Ave., was damaged by fire on Wednesday, Jan. 26. Co-owner Carmelo Gabriele said no one was hurt, but the building did suffer substantial damage.

The Smokin’ Monkey food truck, which specialized in “barbecue with a tropical twist,” is officially off the road.

 

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