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Oct 22, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Spring 2018 Editorial Internship – Apply Now!

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

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Attention journalism, communications and English students: Sauce Magazine is seeking Editorial Interns for spring 2018.

 

We need students with a passion for the St. Louis food scene who want to translate that love to print and online media. As a Sauce Editorial Intern, you will:

-Assist Sauce editorial team with the production of the monthly print publication and daily online products. Duties include, but are not limited to, reporting, conducting interviews, writing articles for The Scoop, fact checking, assisting with research for upcoming articles, interview transcription, etc.
-Attend occasional events and tastings with the Sauce editorial team, gaining real-world experience as a food journalist.
-Hone your reporting, writing and editing skills with the goal of producing published clips for use in future portfolios
-Perform other duties as assigned

 

The Sauce Editorial Intern must have:

-A passion for the St. Louis food scene and the written word
-A working knowledge of AP Style, grammar rules, Microsoft Office and Mac computer systems
-A working knowledge of various social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, etc.)
-Experience conducting phone interviews and writing news articles for print/online publication
-A personable and professional attitude in online, phone and written communication
-The ability to manage his or her time efficiently; should be a self-starter
-A reliable mode of transportation

This internship is unpaid; internship begins in mid-January and ends in early May. Scheduling is flexible, but the intern must be available 10 to 12 hours a week. Interested applicants may submit a cover letter, resume and three to five writing clips to Catherine Klene, Managing editor, digital, at cklene@saucemagazine.com. All resumes must be submitted no later than Nov. 15. No calls, please.

First Look: BLK MKT Eats in Midtown

Friday, October 13th, 2017

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St. Louis has danced with the dual sushi bowl and poke trends for years, but cousins Kati Fahrney and Ron Turigliatto have brought the first fast-casual sushi bowl and roll restaurant to St. Louis with BLK MKT Eats.

The restaurant, located at 9 S. Vandeventer Ave., across from Saint Louis University, opens for lunch Wednesday, Oct. 18.

As The Scoop reported in July, Turigliatto and Fahrney are first-time restaurant owner who turned their passion for home cooking and travel into a business. The former teachers traveled across the country exploring similar concepts and fine-tuning their menu.

The 1,000-square-foot space will operate primarily as a carryout operation with curbside pickup and delivery to come in the near future. Ravenous diners who can’t wait to get home can snack on the spot at a standing bar or one of four stools at the window.

The menu features a handful of items that can be served as a burrito-sized sushi rolls wrapped in thin sheets of nori or as bowls with greens, brown or white rice. Three items are also available as nachos served atop house-made wonton chips.

The cousins source their raw salmon and tuna from Seattle Fish five to six times a week and use it in a variety of items like the OG Fire, which includes the customer’s choice of salmon or tuna. The Swedish Fish showcases Fahrney’s cured salmon, a recipe she’s perfected over years of family Christmas Eve dinners.

Those squeamish about raw fish can try the Tasty As Cluck featuring buttermilk-fried chicken or the Seoul Delicious with grilled chicken. Vegans and vegetarians are not forgotten, either; the Holy Shiitake swaps meat and seafood for braised mushrooms.

BLK MKT Eats will be open Monday to Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from Midtown’s newest fast-casual spot:

 

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Editor’s Note: This article originally stated BLK MKT Eats received fish deliveries three to five times a week. It was updated at 4:45 p.m. with the correct information. 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• BLK MKT Eats will open next month in Midtown

• Build-your-own poke bowl spot Poke Doke will open in the CWE

• Poke: The Hawaiian classic that’s having a big moment

 

First Look: Pig & Pickle in DeBaliviere

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Chef-owner Ryan Lewis is putting the finishing touches on his new restaurant, Pig & Pickle, opening at 5511 Pershing Ave., on Friday, Sept. 29.

Those who’ve passed through Springfield, Illinois in recent years may have stopped at Lewis’ previous restaurant, Driftwood Eatery & Cocktail. As The Scoop reported in July, he decided to close the popular restaurant this summer and open an updated concept with a new name in St. Louis.

Lewis, who grew up across the Mississippi River in Bethalto, said the St. Louis market was a better fit for the type of food he wanted to do. He described Pig & Pickle as a “southern-inspired small plates restaurant” offering sharable dishes of veggies, meat and seafood with southern accents like buttermilk biscuits or pimento cheese.

The space that formerly housed Atlas Restaurant received a fresh coat of paint, new floors and barnwood shelving behind the bar. Lewis said he was attracted to the neighborhood’s residential density and hopes to fill the roughly 50 seats with area regulars.

Some Driftwood favorites like the fried chicken and biscuit and pretzel-crusted cheese curds have landed on Pig & Pickle’s menu, but Lewis said he’s looking forward to new items like a gremolata-style mushroom small plate and a charred octopus dish.

Lewis will continue relationships with several Illinois purveyors like Garden Gate, who produces his grits and cornmeal, but he’s also working with new area vendors like Ozark Forest Mushrooms and Theis Farms.

Once Pig & Pickle receives its liquor license, the bar program will feature house cocktails (Driftwood once boasted a 70-drink menu) and local brews on four taps and in 20 to 30 bottles and cans.

The restaurant will open with dinner service Tuesday to Saturday from 4:30 to 10 p.m. with Saturday and Sunday brunch soon to follow. Here’s a first look at what’s to come from Pig & Pickle:

 

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Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Driftwood Eatery owner to open Pig & Pickle in St. Louis

The Scoop: Atlas Restaurant to close

 

 

First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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At long last, Earthbound Beer’s new home is ready to welcome customers. The brewery and tasting room at 2724 Cherokee St., opens Saturday, Sept. 23.

The massive 2,500-square foot tasting room has been a project two years in the making. As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners and brewers Stuart Keating, Rebecca Schranz and Jeff Siddons announced they were moving from their flagship location down the street at 2710 Cherokee St. The space was less than 1,000 square feet and only allowed the brewers to make one beer at a time.

Eight old Earthbounds could fit into the new space that once housed part of Cherokee Street Brewing in the late 1800s. The tasting room seats around 80 on the first level and mezzanine, a feature designed by architecture and general contractor Nathan Dirnberger. The mezzanine appears to float above the tasting room thanks to railings made of tension wire and heavy-duty chains suspended from the 17-foot barrel ceilings.

Read more: Go underground at Earthbound Beer during construction

Behind the bar, 16 taps will pour Earthbound brews and a few guest taps, with another two nitro taps available. A small selection of spirits will be available (still no mixers or ice, the owners noted) with the potential for batch cocktails in the future. Earthbound patrons can now enjoy wine, too, with two reds, two whites and a rosé available by the glass.

Below the tasting room, a 7-barrel system will increase Earthbound’s production tenfold. The space also houses a canning line that will crank out 16-ounce four-packs of staple brews. Caves underneath neighbor 2720 Cherokee St. will allow for a barrel-aging program in the future.

As The Scoop reported in August, Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will helm the food program at Earthbound. The menu will feature smoked meats, sausages and sandwiches, though food won’t be available until November at the earliest.

Earthbound’s new location means new hours, too. It will be open Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from noon to midnight and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Here’s a first look at Earthbound Beer’s new home.

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Vista Ramen will helm kitchen at new Earthbound location

Extra Sauce: Underground at Earthbound

Earthbound Beer to expand to new brewery on Cherokee

First Look: Grace Meat & Three in The Grove

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

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Chef Rick Lewis is bringing his southern food to The Grove. Grace Meat & Three will open Wed., Sept. 13 at 4270 Manchester Ave., in the former home of Sweetie Pie’s at The Mangrove.

As The Scoop reported in June, Lewis left his role as executive chef of Southern to open his own project with wife Elisa Lewis. Grace will offer a traditional “meat and three” menu featuring mains and rotating seasonal sides like greens, biscuits and mac and cheese.

“It’s all the things we’ve learned over the years coming to fruition here,” Rick said.

Elisa designed the 4,000-square-foot space with finds from rummage sales and items they’d collected over the years like old mattress springs that were turned into living wall decor with succulents and Spanish moss. The space will seat 100, and features a community table and bar stools designed by Goebel & Co.

 

 

Place your order at the counter, then grab a seat and wait for runners to drop off cafeteria trays laden with comfort food. Pick from mains like sweet tea-brined turkey legs, catfish bites or fried chicken, then pick two or three sides. Sandwiches including Rick Lewis’ famous house-made fried bologna and a burger are available, as well as a handful of salads and sharable starters.

Nonalcoholic beverages are self-serve, but customers can pick up canned and bottled beer, a few local draft options and a small selection of cocktails like ice picks, mint juleps and bloody marys at the bar.

Grace will start with lunch service Wednesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., with dinner service soon to follow. Here’s a first look at the newest project from Rick and Elisa Lewis.

 

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Photos by Meera Nagarajan and Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Rick Lewis dubs new restaurant Grace Meat & Three

Rick Lewis to open new restaurant in The Grove

Rick Lewis to leave Quincy Street Bistro, open chicken shack with Pappy’s Mike Emerson

Hit List: 3 new restaurants to try this September

Friday, September 1st, 2017

From a monster food truck to Chinese street food in The Loop, don’t miss these three new restaurants.

 

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1. Nudo House 11423 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, 314.274.8046, Facebook: Nudo House STL
St. Louis-area ramen fans have flocked to Nudo House, the long-awaited noodle shop from Mai Lee’s Qui Tran and Marie-Anne Velasco. Step up to the counter and place your order, then watch the team fly in the open kitchen. Bowls of steaming ramen hit the tables – be sure yours is the Shroomed Out, an unctuous vegetarian option filled with springy noodles, rich soymilk-based broth and meaty braised king oyster mushrooms. It’s topped with baby bok choy, pickled bamboo shoots (menma), fragrant garlic oil and a glorious, gooey marinated egg. If you’re looking for something handheld, try the Banh Mi Pho Dip, Nudo’s take on a classic French dip. French bread is stuffed with tender shredded brisket, flank steak and the usual banh mi accouterments, and served alongside a cup of beefy pho broth. Finish your meal with a cone of the rotating house-made soft serve; keep an eye out for lychee and mango.

2. Pie Hard 8201 W. Main St., Belleville, 314.791.3514, piehardpizza.com
Monster food truck Pie Hard eats normal-sized food trucks for breakfast. Chef-owner Michael Pastor stacked a 20-foot shipping container atop a flatbed, then added a 2½-ton pizza oven for good measure. The truck is making its way into St. Louis and the Metroeast for special events, but regularly parks outside its commissary kitchen to fire up 10-inch wood-fired pies. Put that massive rig to work and order pizzas like the Vladi with vodka sauce, pickled shallot, tender meatballs and crisp fried rosemary atop a toothsome, charred crust. Try a Mexican-inspired pie, the Al Pastor, with a sweet-savory mole sauce, shallot, thinly shaved pork belly, cheddar, queso fresco and wedges of sweet pickled pineapple. And save room for dessert: Pie Hard scoops house-made strawberry-balsamic ice cream between two sea salt chocolate chip cookies and tangy lemon gelato between light meringue disks.

3. Bing Bing 567A Melville Ave., University City, 314.669.9229, Facebook: Bing Bing
The newest addition to The Loop’s international bill of fare is actually just off Delmar Boulevard. Bing Bing specializes in jianbing, a popular street food snack in China made up of eggy pancakes. Sturdy enough to handle like a burrito but thin enough to be mistaken for a crepe, these jianbing are offered in two styles: the cornmeal-based Shandong style and the slightly more delicate mung bean-based Tianjin style. Each is filled with a jumble of flavors – smooth scrambled egg, crunchy wonton and slightly sour Chinese pickles. Add your choice of meat and sauce (the slightly sweet barbecue pork married well with the hoisin-like house sauce, while the golden crispy chicken played happily with the teriyaki-based traditional sauce), then watch as it’s all wrapped up to order.

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Pie Hard pizza truck launches in Belleville, will expand to STL

First Look: Nudo House in Creve Coeur

What I Do: Marie-Anne Velasco of Nudo House

 

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What I Do: Alisha Blackwell-Calvert of Reeds American Table

Friday, September 1st, 2017

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Certified sommelier Alisha Blackwell-Calvert has a knack for navigation. She spends most of her time curating and guiding customers through Reeds American Table’s award-winning wine list, but on Saturdays, she squires tourists about town in a carriage drawn by a horse named Moose. Blackwell-Calvert recently left a promising career in beverage distribution to reenter the restaurant industry as Reeds’ beverage director, and she hasn’t looked back. Here, she shares how she spends her downtime, her thoughts on wine in a can and what she wants to be when she grows up.

“I am a science geek. I love geology; I love geography; I love culture. I had no idea that … in wine, you put all these things together. … The geography of the place and what the people are like and what they eat, and this is the wine that they make and because the sun hits this hill at a certain angle, the grapes taste this way. My mind was blown.”

“I took the entry-level sommelier exam through the Court of Master Sommeliers in Kansas City. I studied for months and months … and did very well. I felt very comfortable taking that test. After the test was over, and I got my little ‘You made it’ diploma, master sommelier Doug Frost leans over and says, ‘You should stick with this.’ … That was a big deal. It made my heart feel good.”

“It took me two weeks to think about [moving to Reeds]. I was very happy with Vintegrity and the hours and the flexibility. But I thought about my career and what I want to do when I grow up, if you will, and Alisha Blackwell-Calvert wants to be a master sommelier. It’s not something you can sign up for and it happens, but it’s what I want to work toward … and in order to do that, you need restaurant experience.”

“It’s not all glitz and glamour and slinging Dom. There’s a lot of hard work that goes into it. I’m constantly tasting. It’s a mountain of paperwork and spreadsheets. The fun part is hanging out on the floor trying to sell you a bottle, but there are hours and hours of work that go into making that moment happen for the guest.”

“Horses are my peaceful time, especially when I’m with my sweetheart, Moose. He’s so calm, and he’s so pretty, and he’s so friendly. We have a bond and a relationship that’s like no other. You can’t nuzzle up to a bottle of wine – or you could. I guess you could. It depends on what the wine is.”

“One thing I want to knock and can’t is wine from a can. I can’t knock it, I’ve had some good ones. They’re not all good, but the good ones are great. Friction makes really good wines in a can. … It’s like blueberry pie. I was like, ‘This is stupid – this is the worst idea ever,’ and then, ‘Aw crap, it’s good. Damn it.’”

“The typical-looking sommelier back in the day used to be the old white guy at the restaurant. Now it’s the young white guy at the restaurant, and I am neither of those things. Especially when you get to the master sommelier level, there are not a lot of people who look like me. … I don’t fit some people’s thought of how I should be. I don’t fit that stereotype or that mold. I don’t seek it out – I’m just me.”

Photo by Ashley Gieseking

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Best New Restaurants: No. 5 – Reeds American Table

Best of Brunch 2017: Reeds American Table

Super Somms: St. Louis’ top wine students prepare to hold court

First Look: The Cut on Cherokee Street

Friday, September 1st, 2017

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Ari Jo Ellis is sharpening her knives for the first service at The Cut, her new restaurant inside The Fortune Teller Bar at 2635 Cherokee St. Doors open tonight, Sept. 1, at 5 p.m.

As The Scoop reported in August, The Fortune Teller Bar’s owners approached Ellis (Sauce Ones to Watch class of 2016) with the opportunity to run a restaurant out of their kitchen a few months after The Little Dipper closed. Ellis has long had an interest in whole-animal butchery, working at Bolyard’s Meat & Provisions, Quincy Street Bistro, Southern and, most recently, Kitchen Kulture.

The Cut’s menu consists of five regular sausages and one special, along with a handful of side options. Customers can try classic bratwursts with beer mustard and sauerkraut or more creative options like the Cherokee-rizo, a nod to the neighborhood’s Mexican heritage. Plant-based eaters won’t be left out, either, with a tofu-based sausage using local Mofu tofu, navy beans, nutritional yeast and spices. All sausages are served on buns from Vitale’s Bakery.

Side options include backyard grilling classics like baked beans and cole slaw, as well as Rap Snacks chips and a “wild card” side that will change depending on that week’s produce delivery.

Ellis will break down about two whole hogs a week (sourced from Such and Such Farms) to create her sausages and some condiments and specials. Ellis said she also hopes to sell some cuts and links for customers to prepare at home.

The Cut will be open Wednesday to Saturday from 5 p.m. to midnight and Sunday from 4 to 11 p.m. Here’s a first look at what to expect from The Cut inside Fortune Teller Bar tonight:

 

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Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Ari Jo Ellis to open The Cut inside The Fortune Teller Bar

Ones to Watch 2016: Ari Ellis

• Best New Restaurants 2016: No. 3 – Southern

Mona’s on The Hill will close doors this Sunday

Friday, September 1st, 2017

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After less than a year in business, owner Brendan Marsden is closing doors at Mona’s – An American-Italian Joint on The Hill. The restaurant’s last day of dinner service will be Sunday, Sept. 3.

“It’s unfortunate, but it’s a decision that I had to make and decided to focus on some more important things in my life, like family and my other job,” he said.

Marsden, who also owns Whitebox Eatery in Clayton, surprised the restaurant community in August 2016 when he closed Modesto Tapas Bar & Restaurant after 15 years. He opened Mona’s in the same space just a few months later. Now, Marsden is selling the 3,600-square-foot space as a turnkey restaurant.

Marsden now plans to focus his energy on his Clayton breakfast and lunch spot.“It’s all on Whitebox now. We’ve got a lot of stuff going on over there,” he said.

He hopes to expand catering operations, explore options for evening events and possibly even take the concept outside the St. Louis area.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
First Look: Mona’s on The Hill

Mona’s to open in former Modesto space

Modesto to close Aug. 20

First Look: Half & Half in Webster Groves

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

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Webster Groves residents will set their alarm clocks a little earlier when Half & Half opens at 220 W. Lockwood Ave. Co-owners Mike and Liz Randolph hope to open the second location of their popular Clayton breakfast and lunch spot by the end of August, pending final inspections.

As The Scoop reported in January, the Randolphs (who also own Randolfi’s and Público in The Loop) signed a lease on the space that once housed First Watch Cafe. The four-month renovation process, helmed by SPACE Architecture & Design, has yielded an 85-seat eatery with a light, airy feel. Randolph said he wanted to evoke the feeling of a New England-style breakfast spot with bright white walls and benches, a large space for waiting near the host stand and big picture windows along the front.

Half & Half executive chef Dale Beauchamp will move to the Webster Groves space, executing the same menu as the sister location – though each restaurant will feature its own weekend brunch specials. Those just looking for a caffeine buzz can pop their heads through a to-go window in the breezeway and place a quick coffee order with the barista behind the bar. This Half & Half will also carry Blueprint Coffee and offer a full menu of traditional drip and espresso options, as well as pour-overs.

Half & Half will be open 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday to Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Here’s what to expect when doors open at the Randolphs’ newest restaurant.

 

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 Space photos by Michelle Volansky; pancake and coffee photos by Carmen Troesser

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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Best of Brunch 2017

Half & Half to open second location in Webster Groves

Meals That Changed My Life: Mike Randolph

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