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Feb 24, 2018
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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The Scoop

City Foundry STL Food Hall locks in first 7 local restaurants

Thursday, January 25th, 2018

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{ City Foundry STL rendering } 

The first group of Food Hall tenants at City Foundry STL, the sprawling 15-acre mixed-use development at 3700 Forest Park Ave.,in Midtown, have been announced.

Brad Beracha, director of culinary services for The Lawrence Group, which is developing the project, said all occupants will be from the St. Louis area and include a mix of established vets and up-and-comers. “It’ll be all top operators and chefs, all St. Louis based, in the food hall,” he said.

 

Essentially Fries owner Matt Borchardt passes a basket to hungry hands.

{ Essentially Tacos owner Matt Borchardt } 

The first group of food hall residents includes:

Matt Borchardt: The chef-owner of Edibles & Essentials will focus on street tacos at Essentially Tacos.

Natalie DuBose: The owner of Natalie’s Cakes & More will bring her penchant for sweet treats to the hall.

Michael Friedman: Formerly the executive chef of Retreat Gastropub, Friedman will open Lost & Found, a burger and pizza concept.

Tamara Keefe and Frank Ubile: The duo will open another location of their popular Clementine’s Creamery.

Brendan Marsden: The owner of Whitebox Eatery plans to introduce a sister restaurant centered on salads.

Britt Simpson and Kevin Pellegrino: The duo behind BK Catering will open Hari Manok, a Filipino grilled chicken restaurant.

Jason and Maria Sparks: The husband and wife who own Layla in The Grove will open Sumax, focused on house-made hummus and wraps.

 

Clementine’s owner Tamara Keefe

{ Clementine’s Creamery owner Tamara Keefe } 

 

The food hall is part of the $185 million first phase of the $230 million project and will eventually be home to 20 individual concepts. Beracha said that the current plan is for the food hall to open in the summer 2019 with 15 of those slots filled.

The Foundry also announced that Austin-based Alamo Drafthouse Cinema plans to open a 10-screen theater and restaurant in the complex. A location of Punch Bowl Social, the Denver-based concept that combines arcade games and food and drink, will call City Foundry home, as well.

In addition to the food hall, the City Foundry complex will also include four brick-and-mortar restaurants that will be home to regional concepts. Fassler Hall from Oklahoma has committed to the project, and Beracha said letters of intent have been signed for the remaining three spots.

Rendering courtesy of City Foundry STL, photos by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• City Foundry to open in Midtown 2018

• First Look: Essentially Fries Food Truck

• Mona’s on The Hill will close doors this Sunday

Water Street, Wasabi downtown announce closures

Wednesday, January 24th, 2018

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{ Water Street owner Gave Kveton }  

Water Street in Maplewood will close up shop at the end of the month after almost seven years. According to a post on the restaurant’s Facebook page, Tuesday, Jan. 30, will be the last day of service.

Water Street opened in April 2011 with owner Gabe Kveton running the bar and the front of the house and his sister, Maria Kveton, helming the stoves as executive chef. Gabe Kventon said his sister left the restaurant last fall to pursue a career outside the restaurant industry.

“I feel like we had a really good run here,” he said. “I was starting to feel just a little bit burned out after seven years, so I put the feelers out to see if anyone would be interested in buying the equipment and buying out the rest of my lease, and I found someone who wanted to do it, so the timing kind of fell into place.”

Kveton declined to reveal the new tenant, but said he had high hopes for the next concept. “It’s going to be really exciting, and it’s going to be really great for Maplewood,” he said. “I can’t wait to see what this person does with it.”

Kveton said he plans to close Water Street with little fanfare. “We’re just going to focus on what we’re doing now and end our run as Water Street and take it from there,” Kveton said. Water Street fans will get the chance to indulge in some of favorite dishes of years past before the doors close, including the restaurant’s popular lemon lasagna.

 

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In other closing news, Wasabi Sushi Bar at 1228 Washington Ave., downtown will close this month and move to a new undisclosed, location, as reported by the Post-Dispatch. Per a post on the restaurant’s Facebook page, the last sushi roll will be served on Wednesday, Jan. 31. The restaurant was the first Wasabi location and opened in 2003.

Wasabi Sushi Bar CEO John Kim said the final destination for the relocation is still up in the air. “We’re looking hard at either Midtown or Central West End,” Kim said. “We’ve got a couple of spots in mind. We hope to have a landing spot by the end of the year.”

Kim said the company has some aggressive expansion plans for the next five years, and plans to have two new restaurants open this year, one of which may be the relocated downtown location.

Announcement of the closure comes a little more than a month after Wasabi opened its newest restaurant at 312 S. Kirkwood Road in Kirkwood.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated at 3:50 p.m. Jan. 24 to include comments for Wasabi Sushi Bar CEO John Kim. 

Photos courtesy of Water Street and Wasabi Facebook pages

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Wasabi Sushi Bar to open Kirkwood location

• McArthur’s Bakery will close location on Olive in Chesterfield

• The Libertine will close for good this weekend

Growler USA will open first area location in St. Charles

Wednesday, January 24th, 2018

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Beer lovers out west will soon have another place to indulge their hops habit. Owners Nicholas and Jody Hester will open a new location of Colorado-based beer pub chain Growler USA next month at 3833 Elm St.

“We want to be a part of the local beer scene by having as many local beers as possible on tap,” said Nicholas Hester, citing breweries such as 4 Hands Brewing Co., Urban Chestnut Brewing Co., Perennial Artisan Ales and Civil Life Brewing Co.

Growler USA St. Charles will have 100 taps that will pour beer, wine and cider. The pub will also have a full kitchen. Hester said kitchen manager Doug Sayles will initially feature a menu with classic pub fare – think wings and burgers – and will eventually spotlight takes on St. Louis favorites, such as “a T-rav with an elevated spin to it.”

The 2,300-square-foot space, which used to be home to a fitness center, will have 73 seats inside, including the bar, and another 50 on the patio when the weather breaks.

Photo courtesy of Growler USA 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Sneak Peek: Two Plumbers Brewery & Arcade in St. Charles

• Brew Hub will open taproom, shelves plans for Chesterfield partner brewery

• Wellbeing Brewing Co. launches St. Louis’ first nonalcoholic brewery

Upcoming pot sticker restaurant Crispy Edge hires exec chef

Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

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  { from left, Crispy Edge executive chef Tori Foster and owner David Dresner } 

Crispy Edge is edging closer to opening. Tori Foster has been tapped to fill the executive chef role at the pot sticker eatery, which is set to open at 4168 Juniata St. in Tower Grove later this spring.

Owner David Dresner said Foster’s academic credentials and passion for all types of food made her the outstanding candidate for the position.

“Crispy Edge aims to explore global cuisines in a traditional Chinese vehicle,” he said. “(Tori) is half-Filipino. She’s lived in Hawaii. She’s very high energy at large. Her enthusiasm to try other flavors and ideas is awesome, and it resonated with me.”

Crispy Edge is Foster’s first executive chef gig, but food has been part of her life from the beginning. She comes from a military family and traveled widely growing up, all the while absorbing the cuisines of the places she lived, and she said her Filipino heritage exposed her to a wide array of influences, as well.

Eventually, Foster attended culinary school at Johnson and Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island, where she got her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees. Then she made her way to St. Louis to attend the master’s program in nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University.

 

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Foster said Dresner’s enthusiasm sold her on the job. “Just hearing how David loved it and what his philosophy on pot stickers was really what drew me in,” she said. “And we’re on the same wavelength on what food should be and what it does, how it creates community and how we can experience it. Everyone is familiar with pot stickers, but we’re doing something completely different with it, and we’re able to be so creative and inclusive of different cuisines.“

Foster, who is involved in recipe development for the company’s wholesale pot sticker business as well, said her goal is to be a well-rounded leader behind the stoves.

“I want to be the executive chef I’ve always wanted,” she said. “I want to run this (kitchen) in the way I’d want a kitchen run that I was working in. I want to be the executive chef who’s hands-on and communicates well with their employees, but also striving to do new things and try new flavors.”

Photos courtesy of Crispy Edge

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Pot sticker restaurant, retail business to launch this fall

• Hit List: 10 new places to try in January

Sauce Magazine: January 2018

 

First Look: Court Louie food truck court in Tower Grove South

Friday, January 19th, 2018

Farmtruk hot salami sandwich

 

St. Louis’ first food truck court, Court Louie, officially opens for business at 4001 Utah St. in Tower Grove South on Saturday, Jan. 20.

The court will be the semi-permanent home for four area trucks: Farmtruk, Go! Gyro! Go!, Steak Louie and Locoz Tacoz. As The Scoop reported in June 2017, Court Louie is the brainchild of Steak Louie truck owner Paul Listenberger.

Court Louie integrates the food truck and restaurant worlds into a single experience. Customers order indoors at the counter, which is divided into four stations – one for each truck. The food is made to order on the trucks, which are parked behind the building. Customers pick up their orders from the counter and grab one of 49 seats inside or another 25 on the patio.

Listenberger said at least two trucks will be onsite during lunch, and three or all four will normally park for dinner service. Other area trucks will make occasional guest appearances, too. Each truck will post when they will be at Court Louie on their social media sites.

Fans of roving meals need not fear. All four trucks will continue to operate on the street and at special events. Court Louie will be open Friday from 3 to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what’s in store at St. Louis’ first food truck court.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Michelle Volansky

Editor’s Note: Shortly after publication, Court Louie changed its operating hours. The original article also included an incorrect opening date. The article was updated at 12:20 p.m. Jan. 22 to reflect those changes. 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Food truck food court to open in South City

• Farmtruk’s Samantha Mitchell named executive chef at The Libertine

The Libertine will close for good this weekend

Longtime chef Joseph Hemp V steps down at Robust Wine Bar

Friday, January 19th, 2018

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Chef Joseph Hemp V is leaving his post as executive chef of Robust Wine Bar and Snax Gastrobar. His last service will be Feb. 14.

Hemp began his tenure with Robust owners Stanley and Arlene Maminta Browne in 2012 as executive chef at the Robust Webster Groves location. He took over the kitchen at the downtown location in 2013, and then took the helm at sister restaurant Snax Gastrobar when it opened in September 2017.

“It just felt like the time,” Hemp said. “I love Stanley and Arlene. They’ve been a huge part of my life. But I’ve had the aching for something new.” Hemp doesn’t know exactly what that “something new” will be yet, and said he may even pursue opportunities outside of the restaurant industry.

“There’s part of me that’s ready to say ‘I’ve had a good run,’ and move on,” he said. “But I’ll always love cooking, every part of it. So maybe I’ll just take a step back from management and just enjoy cooking again. It’s a coin toss right now.”

Arlene Maminta Browne said Hemp will be sorely missed. “There’s not enough words to describe how amazing Joe is as a person and a partner,” said Maminta Browne. “He’s been so great for the organization and really grew us to another level. I’m going to miss him terribly.”

Maminta Brown said after Hemp’s departure, each restaurant will have its own head chef instead of one overall executive chef. Zach Dale, who is currently executive sous chef at Robust in Webster Groves, will become the executive chef at that location. Derek Northway, who came onboard at Snax last month after chef de cuisine Chris Ladley left for Nudo House, will run the kitchen there. Maminta Browne said the search is still ongoing for a head chef at Robust Downtown at The MX.

Hemp agreed with the new staffing arrangement. “I started when there was only one store. I worked out because I grew into the position,” he said. “I know the intricacies of everything, but to put that on somebody new is next to impossible. What works at Webster doesn’t work downtown, and what works downtown doesn’t work at Snax, so having one chef be able to spend their entire focus on one store – I think we’re going to end up with a greater product at the end.”

Photo courtesy of Robust Wine Bar

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
 J McArthur’s to close, new concept from Robust owners to open

• How to conquer the wine list

• Review: Snax Gastrobar

 

McArthur’s Bakery will close location on Olive in Chesterfield

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

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The McArthur’s Bakery Café location at 13700 Olive Blvd., will close its doors for good  Sunday, Jan. 21. Owner Scott Rinaberger made the announcement in a Facebook post today, Jan. 18, citing changes to its online ordering and delivery platform:

“Imagine: it’s just two hours before your big celebration. You’re rushing around, getting everything ready, and the last thing you need is to go out of your way to pick up a cake. With our new online ordering platform, you won’t have to. We’ll bring the cake directly to you!

“As exciting as this new system is, it does not come without a cost. McArthur’s has a limited production capacity and resources with our ovens running nearly 20 hours a day during most of the year. As a result, difficult decisions must be made in regards to where we are and where we are heading.

“One of these difficult decisions is the closure of Chesterfield’s Olive Boulevard location (13700 Olive Blvd.) at the end of business this Sunday, January 21st. This closure will free up many valuable resources, allowing us to focus on serving more people in St. Charles County, Jefferson County, and several communities in Illinois without brick and mortar.”

Tina Tebbe, a spokesperson for McArthur’s Bakery Café, said Rinaberger declined requests for comment.

This is the second McArthur’s Bakery Café closure in recent months. The location at 6630 Delmar Blvd., closed on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017.

The company still has three locations at 3055 Lemay Ferry Road in South County, 210 N. Kirkwood Road in Kirkwood and 158 Long Road in Chesterfield.

Photo courtesy of McArthur’s Bakery Café

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• McArthur’s Bakery Café to open location in The Loop

• McArthur’s Bakery Café relocates in Kirkwood, revamps breakfast and lunch menus

• First Look: Seoul Taco in Chesterfield

Pappy’s Mike Emerson joins the Guerrilla Street Food crew

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

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Guerrilla Street Food has teamed up with an industry veteran to help them expand their Filipino street food empire. Mike Emerson, co-founder of Pappy’s Smokehouse, joined the GSF team as a consultant as they grow their brand.

“I originally reached out to Mike just to ask some advice on what to look for when trying to expand,” said Guerrilla Street Food co-owner Brian Hardesty. “He’s been through all that and come out the other side successfully.”

That meeting evolved into Emerson joining the team to assist in growing the business. “He’ll be kind of an ambassador for Guerrilla,” Hardesty said. “That’s going to be huge for us. He’s kind of got it all figured out. We’re excited to have him on, and the possibilities are endless with him in the mix.

Though no longer involved in the day-to-day operations, Emerson is a spokesperson for Pappy’s and sister eateries Bogart’s Smokehouse, Dalie’s Smokehouse, Adam’s Smokehouse and Southern.

His plate will remain full during the next few months as Guerrilla Street Food prepares to open its next two locations, at 6120 Delmar Blvd., in the Delmar Loop and inside Tropical Liqueurs at 4104 Manchester Ave., in The Grove.

“These guys know what they’re doing,” Emerson said. “Brian just called me and I thought ‘Well, maybe I can help them around a couple of rocks in the river.’ Plus, I feel like it’s a St. Louis requirement to help your brothers out.”

Photo by Greg Rannells

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• What I Do: Heidi Hamamura at Guerrilla Street Food

• Guerrilla Street Food will open a location in The Delmar Loop

• Guerrilla Street Food to open second STL location in new Trops

Tiny Italian eatery Parm Pasta & Sandwich Co. will open on Cherokee

Monday, January 15th, 2018

Chalk up another restaurant for Cherokee Street. As reported by the Riverfront Times, Parm Pasta & Sandwich Co. is scheduled to open its doors this week at 2619½ Cherokee St., in the original Teatopia space.

“We’re shooting (to open) either Jan. 15 or 16,” said Sal D’Ippolito, who owns the shop with his daughter, Diane Maijala.

By his count, D’Ippolito has around 40 years in the restaurant industry, including six years at Cunettos, which is owned by his family, as well as 12 years at his own place, Salvatore’s Casa di Pasta in Lafayette Square. Maijala has spent her career in the medical field and Parm is her first official restaurant gig, though she grew up spending a lot of time in her family’s eateries.

“I’ve always been interested (in the industry),” Maijala said. “I’ve always wanted to do this, and this is the time.”

Parm will have a menu of six hot and cold sandwiches, including a meatball sub, an eggplant parm and a salsiccia sandwich featuring house-made sausage. Other menu items will include mostaccioli with meat sauce plus  daily pasta and soup specials, an Italian salad, chili and homemade cannolis. Maija said all of the dishes are her father’s creations.

“It’s all his recipes,” she said. “His pasta, his meatballs, his salsiccia, everything.”

Due to the diminutive size of the spot, Parm will be a carry-out only affair, according to D’Ippolito. Maijala said the days and hours of operation are still a work in progress, but added Parm will be open Tuesday through Saturday starting at 11 a.m.

Stock photo

Blood & Sand hires chef Brian Coltrain, opens to public Monday and Tuesday

Friday, January 12th, 2018

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Members-only Blood & Sand has a new executive chef. Chef Brian Coltrain quietly assumed leadership of the kitchen in late November, according to general manager Sean Coltrain, who is also Brian’s brother.

Brian Coltrain has spent time in many of the area’s top kitchen, including Element, Niche and Guerrilla Street Food. Most recently he helped open Grace Meat & Three, where he served as front-of-house manager.

“We needed a true leader to be here,” Sean Coltrain said. The restaurant hadn’t had an official executive chef since Josh Charles left the post last spring. “(Brian’s) first real menu was our New Year’s menu. It’s cool to see the new direction he’s going. Now we have a creative force in the kitchen who can pull off what we’ve always wanted to do.”

Brian Coltrain said he’s excited to return to his fine dining roots.

“I’ve always felt I was meant to do fine dining,” he said. “It always felt right. I love the artistic expression. I love being able to use these unique ingredients from all over the world. It just feels like the right time to get back into what I really love.”  

Going forward, Coltrain said he wants to adhere to owner Tim Murphy’s motto: “The food you never knew you loved.”

“I want to introduce people to new ingredients that are prepared in a way that’s approachable and introduces them to another part of the world or another style of cuisine or brings in some history,” he said, adding he also wants to have more vegan and vegetarian dishes.

In addition to his new menu, Blood & Sand will host industry nights on Monday and Tuesday starting mid-January that are open to the public and feature a special menu.

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Chef Josh Charles departs Blood & Sand

New owner discusses vision for Blood & Sand

Zac Adcox moves from Blood & Sand to Reeds American Table

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