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  SAUCE MAGAZINE
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Jul 22, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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In This Issue

Best of Brunch 2017

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

Weekends are not for sad cereal bars and stale office coffee. Weekends are for lingering over sparkling mimosas, velvety hollandaise and syrup-soaked flapjacks. Weekends are for the greatest meal of the week.

In our quest for the area’s top brunches, we laid out some ground rules. Brunch is more than just a hodgepodge of your daily breakfast and lunch; it’s a unique menu or the addition of several specials that take it to the next level. And while there’s a time and a place for buffets, this isn’t it.

We drank dozens of bloody marys and broke countless yolks during the nearly 60 meals we ate to bring you St. Louis’ 23 very best brunches. Clear your schedule – you have weekend plans.

 

Brunch_06_Jul17

{ ricotta pancakes and cacio e pepe eggs at Sardella } 

1. Big Sky Cafe
47 S. Old Orchard Ave., Webster Groves
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: Farmer’s Breakfast, grilled asparagus with Ozark Forest mushrooms, biscuits and gravy

2. Boundary
7036 Clayton Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Must-try dishes: beignets, pancakes, smoked chicken crepe, bacon, egg and avocado sandwich

3. Brasserie by Niche
4580 Laclede Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: French breakfast, croque madame, Corpse Reviver

4. Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern
2101 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: Chicken and waffle sliders, pastrami slinger

5. Cleveland-Heath
106 N. Main St., Edwardsville, Ill.
Brunch: Saturday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Must-try dishes: biscuits and gravy, chilaquiles, Spamwich

6. Copper Pig
4611 Macklind, St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: French toast, chimichanga, Thai Scotch eggs, bacon-cream cheese rangoons, okonomiyaki

 

Brunch_02_Jul17

{ Pony Boy at DeMun Oyster Bar } 

7. DeMun Oyster Bar
740 DeMun Ave., Clayton
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Must-try dishes: breakfast hash, crabcake Benedict, Pony Boy

8. Eclipse Restaurant
6177 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Must-try dishes: shrimp and grits, avocado toast, bananas Foster French toast

9. Edibles & Essentials
5815 Hampton Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: bacon sandwich, quiche, biscuits

 

Brunch_08_Jul17

{ biscuits en papillote at Half & Half } 

10. Half & Half
8135 Maryland Ave., Clayton
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: pulled pork with salsa verde, crispy skinned trout, biscuits en papillote

11. Hiro Asian Kitchen
1405 Washington Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Must-try dishes: Hiro Slinger, glazed salmon rice bowl, matcha or charcoal waffle

12. Katie’s Pizza & Pasta Osteria
9568 Manchester Road, Rock Hill
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: giant pistachio cinnamon roll, wood-oven eggs

13. Layla
4317 Manchester Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: Layla Benny, Sling Blade, banana bread French toast

14. Pastaria
7734 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: breakfast pizza, buttermilk farro waffle

15. Polite Society
1923 Park Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: French toast, pancakes, Farmer’s Breakfast, Benedict, steak and eggs

16. Reeds American Table
7322 Manchester Road, Maplewood
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: poached eggs, Italian beef sandwich

 

Brunch_07_Jul17

{ strata at Russell’s on Macklind } 

17. Russell’s on Macklind
5400 Murdoch Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Must-try dishes: strata, maple-chile glazed fried chicken biscuits, ham and cheese croissant

18. Sardella
7734 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton
Brunch: Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: glazed doughnut, chicken and French toast, ricotta pancakes

19. Scarlett’s Wine Bar
4253 Laclede Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: brioche French toast, breakfast pizza, old-fashioned pancakes

 

Brunch_04_Jul17

{ biscuits and gravy at Seed Sprout Spoon } 

20. Seed Sprout Spoon
3137 Morganford Road, St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: cheddar-herb biscuits, waffle, oyster mushrooms topped grits

21. The Tavern Kitchen & Bar
392 N. Euclid Ave., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: stuffed biscuits and gravy, lemon ricotta doughnut

 

Brunch_01_Jul17

{ matcha pancakes at Vista Ramen } 

22. Vista Ramen
2609 Cherokee St., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Must-try dishes: matcha pancakes, grits, okonomiyaki

23. Yaquis
2728 Cherokee St., St. Louis
Brunch: Sunday 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Must-try dishes: Big Gay Al, Saylor

The full version of this article ran in our July 2017 issue. 

Sardella, DeMun Oyster Bar, Russell’s, Seed Sprout Spoon, Vista Ramen photos by Carmen Troesser; Half & Half photo by Virginia Harold

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

It’s been a week of ups and downs in the St. Louis restaurant industry. Here’s what went down, ICYMI.

 

062017_delpietro

 

1. Chef-owner Michael Del Pietro will open Del Pietro’s at 1059 S. Big Bend Blvd., the former home of Riverbend Restaurant & Bar and Harvest, this fall.

2. St. Louis will have to wait a bit longer for Senn Bierwerks to debut. On Thursday, June 15, the company announced via Facebook that its brewery project wouldn’t be going forward at the proposed location at 7593 Olive Blvd. in University City.

 

062217_ciceros

 

3. An old favorite in The Delmar Loop will close its doors for good. Cicero’s will shutter at 6691 Delmar Blvd., on Sunday, June 25 after four decades in business.

4. Long known for its sweet treats, Bissinger’s is branching out into the restaurant scene with Handcrafted by Bissinger’s, a new cafe concept located at the company’s longtime space at 32 Maryland Plaza in the Central West End.

 

062017_Grace

 

5. Chef Rick Lewis’ forthcoming restaurant has a name: Grace Meat & Three. As Sauce reported earlier this month, Lewis and his wife, Elisa Lewis, left Southern to strike out on their own at 4270 Manchester Ave., in The Grove, the former home of Sweetie Pie’s.

 

062117_crispyedge

 

6. David Dresner intends to open the “mecca of pot stickers” this fall at 4168 Juniata St., in Tower Grove South. Dresner is finalizing his two-year long endeavor to launch a production facility for his retail line of pot stickers, Crispy Edge, and a yet-to-be-named restaurant.

7. Local craft brewer Evan Hiatt has been tapped as cider master of the upcoming Brick River Cider Co. Hiatt was co-founder and brewmaster of Six Row Brewing Co., which closed in 2015, then served as brewmaster for Pappo’s Pizzeria & Brew Co., which took over the Six Row space and closed this spring.

 

 

 

 

Readers’ Choice 2017: Favorite Breweries

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

The St. Louis beer scene is inviting and ripe with awesome people and delicious suds. Every place is doing something different, so spend your weekend imbibing at your Favorite Local Breweries:

 

TastingRoom_4Hands

{ 4 Hands tasting room }

4 Hands Brewing Co.
Nestled just south of Busch Stadium, 4 Hands boasts one of the most creative beer portfolios the city has to offer. Hops, barrels and experimental collaborations are no stranger to this brewery’s lineup. The team behind the City Wide beer project, 4 Hands is synonymous with community involvement and support. Stop in before the next Cardinals game, check out the new upstairs bar and game area, order an Incarnation IPA, and grab grub from Peacemaker and Sidney Street Cafe’s new 4 Hands kitchen program.

 

TastingRoom_UCBC

{ Urban Chestnut Brewery & Bierhall in The Grove } 

Urban Chestnut Brewing Co.
As polka fans know, “In heaven there is no beer/that’s why we drink it here!” German-influenced Urban Chestnut has given St. Louis beer drinkers three options for imbibing. Planning a quieter date night or want some sun? Hit up the OG brewery and Biergarten in Midtown. The much larger and industrious brewery and Bierhall in The Grove plays a great host to happy hours and large groups, and the newly developed URB (Urban Research Brewery) across the street from the Bierhall is great if you want to nerd out over a Stammtisch and grab a slice of pizza.

 

TastingRoom_Schlafly

{ Schlafly Bottleworks in Maplewood } 

Schlafly
The original craft brewery in the land of Anheuser-Busch, Schlafly set the scene for the boom of smaller breweries in The Lou. Bar seats at the original Tap Room downtown are always filled with Billiken, Cards and Blues fans and lifelong regulars there to see their favorite tenured barkeep. Looking for a more broad and inclusive brewery experience? Head to Bottleworks, the production facility in Maplewood – that also plays host to some fantastic events – and reserve your spot for the super informative brewery tour. End your experience on the covered patio for some live music, nachos and a pour of Schlafly Kölsch.

 

TastingRoom_CivilLife

{ Civil Life tasting room }

Civil Life Brewing Co.
Consistently cited as the “brewer’s brewery,” Civil Life is the industry home away from home. True-to-style English- and German brews, friendly bar staff and a humble pub atmosphere all combine to create one of the most spectacular places to drink in the Tower Grove South neighborhood. Stop in on Sunday for chef Tony Collida taco offerings – or soup during the cooler months – and join in the camaraderie of friends, brewers and families. Although you can’t go wrong with any of Civil Life’s offerings, grab a pour of its Vienna lager or opt for anything on cask.

 

TastingRoom_SideProject

{ The Side Project Cellar }

Side Project Brewing
Just a few moments spent within the walls of Side Project’s new tasting room or at The Side Project Cellar, its beer bar down the street, and you’ll understand why the beer receives worldwide recognition and the James Beard Foundation gave a nod to The Cellar for Outstanding Bar Program in 2015. This Maplewood brewery houses barrel-aged beers that showcase funk, complexity and depth, as well as a knowledgeable staff (full disclosure: I used to manage The Cellar). Sip on a pour of Grisette and you’ll understand why this place draws the attention of beer hoarders and beer drinkers alike.

 

TastingRoom_Perennial

{ Perennial Artisan Ales tasting room } 

Perennial Artisan Ales
Home to Abraxas, Southside Blonde, an extensive barrel program and Thursday night hand pies, Perennial’s tasting room is bright, inviting, and always full of chatty locals and out-of-towners on their way through this beer city. Located in deep South City, this newly expanded brewery is kid friendly and has a wonderful patio for Saturday day-drinking after the 2 p.m. brewery tour. Looking for a weekday adventure? Stop in Thursdays around 6 p.m. for a weekly new beer release.

4 Hands and Side Project photos by  Michelle Volansky; Urban Chestnut and Perennial photos by Jonathan Gayman, Civil Life photo by David Kovaluk; Schlafly photo courtesy of Schlafly

Katie Herrera is account manager at Craft Republic. 

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Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2017 

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Hit List: 4 new places to try in June

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

The Sloppy Joe Joe, named for co-owner Wendy Hamilton’s brother, is served open-faced and doused in beer cheese sauce on spent-grain sourdough.

 

1. Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern 2101 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, 314.241.4677, charlevillebeer.com

What happens when you combine a Ste. Genevieve brewhouse with a city-savvy restaurant group? Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern. The newest partnership between the 14-year-old brewery and Hamilton Hospitality (of Eleven Eleven Mississippi, Vin de Set, et al.) offers a relaxed eatery with a backyard cookout vibe. Choose from 14 Charleville brews on tap like the Long White Cloud, a New Zealand-style Pilsner, or the Rye by Night, a black rye IPA collaboration with Heavy Riff Brewing Co., and peruse an extensive menu of bar snacks and creative takes on comforting classics. Don’t miss the Sloppy Joe Joe, a meaty, cheesy mess served open-faced on spent-grain sourdough that requires a knife and fork, or the house-smoked pastrami sandwich cut thick and generously portioned. Share a pile of South City Fried Chicken Livers with all the smooth creaminess you want (and none of the gaminess you fear). If you’ve managed to save room for dessert, order the classic diner-style apple pie domed with a cinnamon-sugar crumb crust and served a la mode with house-made vanilla ice cream.

 

2. Das Bevo 4749 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314.396.6900, dasbevo.com

Bevo Mill has a new lease on life as Das Bevo. The rejuvenated South City landmark now houses an event space and a modern day Bierhall with a compact, pub-style menu with a German-American accent. The kraut balls – deep-fried spheres of sauerkraut and bratwurst with a side of tangy beer cheese mustard – make a fine accompaniment to a frosty stein of lager. Bigger plates include burgers, sandwiches, sausage boards and specialties like the pork schnitzel, pounded thin, fried and served open-faced on a slice of grilled rye bread and augmented with a bacon and bratwurst gravy and carrot-kraut slaw. Prost!

 
A 20-inch cheese pizza is available whole or by the slice.

 

3. Pizza Head 3196 S. Grand Ave., St. Louis, 314.266.5400, pizzaheadstl.com

Pizza Head is simple: enormous New York-style pies consumed to the tunes of classic punk. The chewy, thin crust – just sturdy enough to support massive slices – is topped with classic red sauce and cheese, creamy white pizza accouterments or vegan “cheese,” then piled high from a list of vegetarian toppings. It’s an edgy, less refined departure for chef-owner Scott Sandler, best known for his meticulous Neapolitan-style pies at Pizzeoli. With just one salad and a handful of drinks, Pizza Head’s barebones menu is focused on specials. Grab some friends and get a 20-inch cheese pizza and four 16-ounce Stags for $25, or dine solo with two cheese slices and a domestic pint for $8.

 

4. Humble Pie 9783 Clayton Road, Ladue, 314.997.7070, eatthehumblepie.com

The team at Fozzie’s Sandwich Emporium has stepped into the pizza game at Humble Pie. Start with fresh, green-tasting pesto chicken salad served atop crisp romaine before digging into your pizza. You can’t go wrong with a classic like pepperoni on super-thin crust, but we also love The Lily Pad pizza on the crispy, focaccia-like Sicilian crust. It comes with herbed ricotta sauce topped with leeks, caramelized onion, portobellos, sausage and a drizzle of truffle oil. And don’t forget dessert – the Gimme S’more pie is filled with a crazy rich, dense hazelnut-chocolate ganache and topped with marshmallow fluff. There’s no reason Humble Pie should be so modest.

Photos by Michelle Volansky

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: June 2017

First Look: Pizza Head on South Grand

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What I Do: Logan Ely at Square1 Project

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

loganely

 

Chef Logan Ely doesn’t know what he’s doing, but he’s figuring it out. A St. Louis native, Ely moved back in February after stints at James Beard Award-winning restaurants like Blue Hill in New York City and Pass & Provisions in Houston, to name a few.

He started his underground dinner series, Square1 Project, while looking for a permanent restaurant space. With a propensity for fermented flavors and radically sustainable ingredients – think weaver ants, not just local produce – he serves unique, 14-course tasting menus prepared with minimal equipment and limited resources. He might just know more than he’s letting on.

 

“I had zero money. I had a couple friends who I knew would help me and be a part of it, but I had zero vendors. I was like, ‘Oh, shit. How are we going to do this?’ That’s square one: I know I need tables and chairs. I know I need to get a good credit card and max that thing out. I didn’t want help. I wanted to build this up to something … find my voice. I think it’s the same thing with a writer or a painter. You need a venue to write and get better at what you do, and this is what that is for me – and us, I should say. That’s Square1 Project.”

“Cooking is such a hard thing to do and dedicate your life to. To me, it has to mean something. It’s gotta be important. It’s not enough to just open a restaurant and be like, okay now I want to get an award or two. … I certainly wouldn’t call myself an activist at all, but I’m in that realm of, ‘Hey, it’s OK to eat insects, and look – I can make this taste really good, and it’s sustainable, and you get to support this woman in Denver that’s really trying to do this thing.’ [Wendy Lu McGill, from Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch] is an activist. She’s out doing speeches and all that stuff. I think that’s where I see this whole project, restaurant, team going.”

“I’m not going to hand you a bowl of maggots or anything. You won’t even probably see the bugs. Right now I have a garum, a fish sauce, going with crickets and a miso that will take 10 weeks with weaver ants. It’s not gross. I wish I had some on me – I’ve been giving people tastes. When the vendors come by I’m like, ‘Here, taste this.’”

“It’s not like a chef comes into a kitchen and writes a menu and teaches a cook how to do it and that’s it. It’s like, ‘Hey, the fish delivery didn’t show up,’ or, ‘Hey, there’s a gas leak,’ or, ‘This thing caught on fire,’ or, ‘The health inspector is going to shut us down unless this is fixed.’ It’s literally that every single day. It’s the unglamorous part of the gig. It’s what all these Netflix shows don’t show – the chef in the back trying to fix the oven.”

“[North Pond in Chicago] was the first restaurant I worked at where it was so hard, I hated every day of it. Nothing was ever right that I did, nothing was ever good enough. I wasn’t fast enough. I wasn’t clean enough. I was terrible. I had stomachaches every day. … And then, a year-and-a-half goes by, and you realize, ‘I’m way better than my first day.’ The chef [Bruce Sherman] pulled me outside and was like, ‘Hey, good job. You did really well. I pushed you really hard and you were there every step of the way and you grew a lot and I’m really proud of you.’ That was huge.”

“There’s always those things you don’t learn as a cook. Anything fermented, you don’t get a lot of in kitchens – most health departments or inspectors don’t like to see that shit around. So when we were in New York, me and my buddy decided we should know how to do charcuterie. So we started fermenting meat, and we ended up with like seven refrigerators full in our Brooklyn apartment – it was hilarious. He actually now owns a butcher shop in Brooklyn.”

“I get bored very easily. We’ll put something on the menu, and four weeks later I’m like, ‘Oh my God, that’s so embarrassing. I can’t believe we were actually serving that.’”

“At a successful restaurant, the chefs work more hours than the cooks. Dan [Barber, chef at Blue Hill] is a good example. Between the two restaurants, writing his book, doing TED Talks and all this stuff. He’s an awesome dude, very smart, but he’s working his ass off. He’s doing so much stuff. I think that’s inspiring, and it keeps you going if you’re having a hard night or a rough week.”

Book your reservation at Square1 Project, Twitter: @Square1_Project, Instagram: @square1_project

Photo by Ashley Gieseking

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WWhat I Do: Patrick Olds of Louie’s Wine Dive

Trendwatch: What’s on the plate, in the glass and atop our wish list right now

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

060117_trendwatch

 

1. Proof in the Pudding
We’ve come a long way since Snack Packs – like the butterscotch pot de crème at Olive & Oak, a rich caramel pudding capped with salted caramel and whipped cream. At Pint Size Bakery, occasionally available Yum Cups are filled with rotating pudding flavors. But we all know chocolate reigns supreme, like the blend of milk and dark chocolate pudding with a black cocoa brownie, Thai basil ice cream and fresh blackberries currently on the menu at Taste. Retreat Gastropub recently offered an orange- and lemon-scented chocolate pudding served with toasted marshmallows and almond biscotti, while ClevelandHeath serves its version with Chantilly whipped cream and chocolate-dipped puffed rice.

 

2. Activate
Charcoal has made the move from face masks to the table. Gaining popularity as a detox ingredient at California juice shops like Pressed Juicery and Juice Served Here in recent years, activated charcoal has been making an appearance in cocktails like the inky mezcal-based Moonwalk at New York’s Mission Chinese Food. Closer to home, the black-hearted ingredient showed up for brunch in a chocolate-charcoal waffle at Hiro Asian Kitchen. Try a taste of the darkness at Clementine’s Creamery, where the black cherry ice cream is made with activated charcoal.

 

3. Bring in the Funk
Savory caramels are currently lending a sweet, funky accent to all manner of cuisine in St. Louis. The Copper Pig and Juniper have both combined fish sauce and caramel to great effect – the former on chicken wings and the latter on chicken and waffles. At Vista Ramen, crab caramel brings subtle sweetness and an unctuous umami pop to a tender pork rib dish. A little funk works just as well in cocktails, like The Sound of One Hand Clapping recently at Planter’s House, which combined tequila and mezcal with a miso-caramel syrup. On a more vegetal note, a beet caramel adds earthy sweetness to roasted beets, charred carrots and whipped herbed goat cheese at Boundary, while Vicia recently offered hazelnut financiers with an onion caramel sauce.

 

4. Get Crackin’
Pistachios have been lending their mild, nutty flavor to a variety of cocktail menus around town. The Lights Down, Music Up at ClevelandHeath uses Dumante Verdenoce, an Italian pistachio liqueur, to complement apricot and lemon in the rum-based drink. At The Preston, The Lady of Kildare, a unique tiki cocktail with Irish whiskey instead of the usual rum, includes a house-made pistachio syrup that plays well with tropical flavors like coconut and pineapple. And the Garden of Forking Paths at Taste utilizes the nut itself – ground and rimming a Collins glass.

 

5. The Big Cheese
Grilled cheese sandwiches have been subbing in for buns lately. Take The Big Lou special at The Corner Butcher in Fenton, where two of the sandwiches held two patties topped with nacho cheese. The Libertine appended GC to a classic BLT for a brunch special, and the ever-fluctuating menu at Shift: Test Kitchen recently experimented with The Sasquatch, pulled pork and cole slaw between two gooey sammies. Head to Festus for a Fatty Melt at Main & Mill Brewing Co., a classic patty melt with two grilled cheese sandwiches. And of course, Sugarfire Smoke House and Hi-Pointe Drive-In get in on the action with the Sweet Baby Cheesus special.

 

6. The Spice Route
Area bartenders are reaching into the spice cabinet for a taste of India on their cocktail menus. Retreat Gastropub mixes gin with coconut milk, turmeric and ginger in the curry leaf-topped Golden State, and combines rum, mango, vermouth and chai in its Cash Me Outside cocktail. Reeds American Table opts for yellow curry and coriander mixed with coconut milk in the Philosophical Zombie, while Planter’s House recently featured a chai five-spice syrup with bourbon, tequila and amaro in the Exit Stage Left. Polite Society’s arsenal of house-made tinctures and infusions includes a blood orange and cardamom gastrique featured in the Sanguine cocktail, made with vodka and coconut water. Frazer’s makes use of Desipop, a masala-cumin soda, in its rum-based Kama Sutra. Over at Eclipse, they’re shaking cardamom bitters into the Effervescent Love Machine, while just down the street, the team at Randolfi’s also added cardamom bitters to Advice from a Fortune Cookie and curry bitters to A Rule of Plumb.

 

Photo by Carmen Troesser

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Eat This: Kale-ifornication Salad at Pi Pizzeria

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

060117_eatthis

 

Not just any salad can win our hearts over deep-dish pizza. In Pi Pizzeria’s Kale-ifornication Salad, quinoa adds heft to a baby Tuscan kale base, and spiced roasted chickpeas and flaked almonds bring necessary crunch. Tart slivers of pickled red onion and juicy grape tomatoes cut through the indulgent, peppery buttermilk dressing, and two triangles of chewy cornmeal flatbread satisfy any lingering crust cravings. Pizza who?

Photo by Julia Calleo

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Make This: Summer Clafoutis

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

MakeThis

 

Somewhere between a fruit-filled pancake and a custard, clafoutis can be drizzled with syrup for brunch or topped with ice cream for dessert.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk together 1 cup whole milk, 3 eggs, ½ cup sugar, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 1 tablespoon lemon zest and ½ teaspoon almond extract. Stir in ½ cup flour, then pour the batter into a buttered cast-iron skillet or pie pan.

Sprinkle 2 cups blueberries over the top and bake until puffy and light brown, 35 to 40 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes, dust with powdered sugar and serve. 

Customize your clafoutis: Use halved cherries, seasonal berries, chopped peaches or quartered figs. Try pears, apples or grapes in the fall, or throw in chocolate chips and cinnamon year-round.

Photo by Julia Calleo

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Sauce Magazine: June 2017

• Make This: Arepas

Just Five: Red Hot Riplets Chicken Tenders

Readers’ Choice Bartenders of the Year

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

bartenders

{from left, Elijah Barnes, Terry Oliver and Tony Saputo at Frazer’s }

What has been your most awkward moment on the job? 

“I had to cut off two guys who I’ve known for a long time as regulars [on different nights]. One I coaxed into drinking some coffee and eating something, but the other guy didn’t take it well at all. He stood up and got huffy. They decided they were never coming back. I felt bad, but at the end of the day you’re just trying to look out for them. They did eventually come back, though they didn’t mention what happened. Everyone’s on good terms.” – Winner, Elijah Barnes at ClevelandHeath

“One of the regulars at a bar I worked at was a call girl, and she met all of her johns at the bar. She’d come and go several times a night. I think she knew that I knew. Making small talk was really hard. You couldn’t really ask her, ‘How’s tricks?’” – 2nd Place, Tony Saputo at Atomic Cowboy

“We had a group that came in for a few hours and had a good time. One woman went to the bathroom and came back out, and their server came up to me and said, ‘That woman isn’t wearing any pants.’ I told him she was probably just wearing flesh-colored tights or something. He came back and said, ‘Nope, she’s not wearing any pants.’ Sure enough, she was buck-naked from the waist down. I went to the one woman in the group I knew and told her about it. She pulled her friend aside, and her friend said, ‘Oh my God, who took my pants?’ Thankfully all of the other guests were gone.” – 3rd Place, Terry Oliver at Frazer’s

Photo by Jonathan Gayman 

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Sauce Magazine: Readers’ Choice 2017

Ones to Watch 2017: Elijah Barnes of ClevelandHeath

Top Shelf: 5 bartenders you should know 

Readers’ Choice Favorite New Restaurant: Olive & Oak

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

oliveandoak

{ clockwise from top, mixed green salad, Cuban sweet potatoes, O&O Burger, The Dip, blue crab gratin at Olive & Oak }

 

If you could actually snag a standing reservation at the wildly popular Olive & Oak in Webster Groves, you’d find a different menu each time. Executive chef Jesse Mendica tweaks vegetable preparations or swaps a protein in her playful twists on classics nearly every day.

“Just trust us,” she said. “I won’t lead you into something you don’t want.” Here, Mendica shared her go-to salad, staff obsessions and the handful of constants on the flexible menu of your Favorite New Restaurant.

Mixed Green Salad
“It’s over grilled, awesome potato bread – that’s a sleeper hit. To call it a potato bread is a shame because its half mashed potatoes-half bread, so it’s dense and thick and gooey.”

Cuban Sweet Potatoes
“When you make people happy with vegetables, that’s a real feat. Steak is easy, a fatty burger is easy – vegetables take a little more effort and risk. When people dig on the vegetables, I’m so excited.”

O & O Burger
“We have to plead with [employees] to eat something other than a burger. We’re worried about you. You’re going to become a burger.”

The Dip
“It’s roasted leg of lamb with drunken goat cheese and lamb jus. Don’t miss it. We did a veggie dip and a ham dip and a pork dip, but nothing compares to this. I’m head over heels for it.”

Blue Crab Gratin
“It’s total comfort food. It’s just a cheesy crab dip – spicy and warm and sharable.”

Photo by Carmen Troesser

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