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May 01, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Archive for November, 2016

Eat This: Mangia Bene at Smokee Mo’s

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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The Mangia Bene at Smokee Mo’s BBQ requires stretchy pants and time for a post-meal nap. Thick, tender slices of smoked brisket are carved to order and smothered with Mo’s White Sauce, a creamy vinegar-horseradish aioli. The meat’s layered between two halves of buttery garlic bread shellacked with Provel cheese. Lettuce? Onion? Tomato? Such paltry accouterments would just get in the way.

 

Related Content

Eat This: Strawberry Mousseline Cake at La Bonne Bouchée

Eat This: Honey-glazed chicken wings at Diner’s Delight

Eat This: Original Palestine at Medina Grill

• Eat This: Wow Board at Annie Gunn’s

 

Photo by Carmen Troesser

 

Make This: Thai Noodles with Gai Lan

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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Skip the Thai takeout and put this dish on the table in 15 minutes flat. In a medium bowl, pour boiling water over 14 ounces rice stick noodles and let sit 7 minutes. Drain and rinse the noodles then toss them with 2 tablespoons sesame oil. In a small bowl, combine ⅓ cup soy sauce, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1½ tablespoons chile-garlic sauce, 1 tablespoon grated ginger and 2 teaspoons rice vinegar. Set aside. In a large skillet or wok over high heat, warm 3 tablespoons vegetable oil. Add the noodles to the skillet with 6 cups roughly chopped gai lan. Saute 2 minutes, then stir in the sauce and cook 1 to 2 minutes more. Garnish with ⅓ cup each chopped basil, cilantro and mint; ¼ cup chopped peanuts; and lime wedges.

 

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Make This: Leftover Turkey Cuban

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• Make This: No-Churn Matcha-Coconut Ice Cream

Photo by Greg Rannells

What I Do: Doug Marshall, The Tamale Man

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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{ from left, Rachel Rogers and her father, Doug Marshall }

 

When Marisa Marshall decided to take up organic farming, her husband Doug Marshall figured the best way to get a foot in the door at local farmers markets was by offering prepared food. Now, most Marshall Family Farms produce is sold in tamale form, and you probably know him as The Tamale Man – dishing out family recipes with three of their seven children and one son-in-law at private events, Southwest Diner’s Tamale Tuesdays and farmers markets from Tower Grove to Lake St. Louis. Here, the boss dad shared his perspective on family business.

Aztec Hot Pockets
“[Tamales have] been around for centuries. We tell people it’s like the original Hot Pocket. They were already wrapped, and they traveled easily. The Aztecs, when they went on hunting parties, cooked a bunch of them.”

Christmas tradition
“[Tamales were a] Christmas present from my grandmas, every year. My mom passed away when I was 9 and my dad married another woman, who was half Mexican, half Cuban. So I basically grew up with two Mexican grandmothers. That was always a blast, [making] the tamales. I would help. When you got to driving age, you had to take them shopping. We went to the Soulard [Farmers] Market because they had to get the fresh stuff. There was a process. They basically pointed and told you what to do. I was trying to be nice, but yeah. They were pretty bossy.”

Family recipe
“When my grandmothers cook, they have their favorite coffee cup with the handle broken and stuff. They didn’t use tablespoons or anything. I really started from memory, and just kind of adapted it over the years to try to capture what I remember as a child.”

Skin in the game
“Family dynamics are interesting when you’re working together because everybody wants to have ownership of what you’re working on – which is a good thing. They want to be involved. I used to be ‘It’s my way or the highway,’ but for long-term success, that’s not really a good strategy. In any situation, I think if everyone has skin in the game, they’re going to be more productive.”

Proper technique
“For years, everybody boiled the meat. Now we marinate it and roast it. We take the trimmings and render our own fat and lard to use in the tamales. We make our stocks. … You’ve got to roast [the chiles], put them in a container, let them steam, clean them. [The kids] were like, ‘Can’t we just use canned chiles?’ No.”

Father of seven
“I used to try to micromanage everything. Now I try to let them figure it out. My youngest is 18, so now I like to say, ‘We’re all adults here, so figure it out.’ You can be mad at each other, but at the end of the day we’re all on the same team.”

Family Competition
“I was a former athlete and I still believe in keeping score. We have friendly competitions on Saturdays at the different markets. We compare totals and rib each other. I’ll say something like, ‘Nobody remembers second place.’ But it’s all in good fun. I’m admonished frequently. … If I have an off day, I’m kind of dour, kind of sullen about that and of course they pile on. My daughters [tell] me to be grateful, and [my son] Rudy and [son-in-law] Brian basically say, ‘Ha ha!’”

Business goals
“If you asked me the long-term goal when they were in diapers, that was my goal: That we enjoy each other’s company and like being around each other. I’d say that’s come to fruition. Marisa and I are very happy about that. There’s no black sheep thus far. They’re all really good friends.”

 

Related Content
What I Do: Mark ‘Garlic’ Brown of Gateway Garlic Farms

• What I Do: Marie-Anne Velasco of Nudo House

What I Do: Dan Brewer of Mofu

The Weekend Project: Tamales

 

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Grilled: Curried Barbecue Spare Ribs

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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These are easily the best ribs I have ever made. Individual ribs are seared and cooked in a bath of colorful Asian barbecue sauce over indirect heat. As someone who has royally screwed up countless slabs of ribs using the old dry-rubbed, slow-smoked method, I loved that this method was entirely no-fuss – zero marinade time, zero brining, zero smoking and zero headaches. The unlikely secret to this dish is the curry powder, which creates a rich, savory sweet sauce that drenches each rib.

 

Curried Barbece Spare Ribs
6 servings

½ cup ketchup
¼ cup soy sauce
2 large garlic cloves, diced
1 Tbsp. curry powder
1 Tbsp. rice wine vinegar
1 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1 tsp. Sriracha
½ tsp. sesame oil
½ tsp. sugar
4 lbs. pork spare ribs (or baby back), cut into single ribs
Diced green onions, for garnish

• In a large bowl, make a barbecue sauce by whisking together the ketchup, soy sauce, garlic, curry powder, rice wine vinegar, vegetable oil, Sriracha, sesame oil and sugar. Set aside.
• Prepare a charcoal grill for high, indirect heat. Place a large cast-iron skillet or grill pan on the cool side of the grill.
• Sear the ribs over direct heat, flipping occasionally to avoid flare-ups, 12 to 15 minutes. Place the ribs in the cast-iron skillet and brush each with a layer of barbecue sauce. Cover the grill and cook over indirect heat 45 minutes.
• Brush the ribs with another layer of barbecue sauce. Add about 15 pieces of charcoal to the fire. Cover the grill and cook over indirect heat another 45 minutes.
• Remove the skillet from grill. Brush the ribs with the remaining barbecue sauce. Cover the skillet with foil and let rest 15 minutes. Serve garnished with the green onions.

 

More Grilling Recipes 

Smoked Trout Chowder

Stuffed Greek Burgers

Korean Pork Steaks

Grilled Halloumi

 

Matt Berkley is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and the Nightlife critic. 

The Scoop: The Dark Room to move to Grandel Theater

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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A new space for nightlife is developing at 3601 Grandel Square as The Dark Room Wine Bar & Photo Gallery prepares to move from its current location at 615 N. Grand Blvd., to the Grandel Theater. The Kranzberg Arts Foundation is renovating the Grandel, and in February 2017, the lobby and commons area will be home to an new Dark Room.

“This is a great opportunity to expand our programing and capacity and to double down on our commitment to supporting the arts,” said Chris Hansen, Kranzberg Arts Foundation executive director.

Hansen said those expansions include extended hours, 30 percent more seating inside and another 50 seats on the patio. The Dark Room will also serve as the food and beverage provider for the theater. A newly designed and installed kitchen will be under the direction of chef Samantha Pretto, who came on board in December 2015.

Patrons can expect an expanded cocktail menu designed for theater-goers who need to get to the show on time, as well as a new late-night food menu following productions. Private dining rooms will also be available.

Customers who enjoyed the live jazz and visual arts exhibits at The Dark Room can expect the same vibe with rotating installations.“The Dark Room meets (Kranzberg Arts Foundation’s) mission to invest in infrastructure and systems that support the arts,” said Hansen. “Its programs can be the backbone of the Grandel Theater.”

He plans to announce new menu details closer to opening.

 

Related Content
Nightlife: The Dark Room

The Scoop: Chef Samantha Pretto joins The Dark Room

Sneak Peek: The Dark Room

The Scoop: The Dark Room wine bar and photo gallery to open in Grand Center

The Scoop: Death in the Afternoon closes

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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Citygarden is minus a lunch spot (at least for now) as Death in the Afternoon served its last bowl of ramen on Wednesday, Nov. 23. As reported by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, owners TJ Vytlacil and Adam Frager decided not to renew Death in the Afternoon’s lease in order to continue to grow their point of sale software company, Brigade Society, which publicly launched last year.

“We’re choosing to put all our energy into Brigade Society, and we’re doing well,” said Frager. “Knowing we’ll be traveling a lot in the immediate future, it would have been unfair to the staff, guests and Citygarden if we weren’t here to support the restaurant. We never wanted to be absentee owners.”

Unlike Blood & Sand, which Vytlacil and Frager sold earlier this fall, Death in the Afternoon’s building was leased, and the timeline was shorter. It took nearly nine months to close the sale of Blood & Sand.

“Selling a restaurant is a time-consuming process,” said Frager. “Citygarden has been fantastic and a pleasure to work with. When we started there was some skepticism about the location, but that’s never been an issue. We’ve always been profitable, so I hope we’ve proved that the location is not a hindrance but a benefit. We just didn’t have the luxury of time to put it up for sale.”

The restaurant had been open just more than two-and-a-half years, and Frager said will miss the diners and relationships.

“That was the hardest part of the decision,” he said. “Knowing how many friends have supported us in this. But it is out of respect for them that we closed. If there isn’t a strong leadership or ownership presence, then it’s hard to maintain the experience people had come to enjoy.”

 

Related Content
• The Scoop: New owner discusses vision for Blood & Sand

• The Scoop: Blood & Sand owners put downtown bar up for sale

The Scoop: Nick Martinkovic parts ways with Death in the Afternoon, Blood & Sand

The Scoop: Death in the Afternoon to extend hours for evening service

• Power Lunch: Death in the Afternoon

 

Photo by Jonathan Gayman

Just Five: Broccoli Soup

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

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In my house, broccoli is king of the vegetables. We eat it steamed, roasted, stir-fried, raw or covered in cheese (duh). This simple broccoli soup includes tarragon, which created a house divided. Those 40 and older liked the slight hint of anise the scant amount of fresh tarragon added to the soup. However, the 20-and-younger contingent thought it might die from eating what it ascertained to be the equivalent of an entire bag of black licorice. The same group agreed that an alternate version, made with a couple fresh basil leaves in lieu of tarragon, was delicious. And still, the king remains on his throne.
Broccoli Soup
3 to 4 servings

1 Tbsp. olive oil
¼ cup minced shallot
1 lb. (about 5 cups) chopped broccoli, stems and florets
3 cups chicken broth, plus more as needed
¼ cup cream cheese
1 Tbsp. chopped tarragon or basil, plus more for garnish
¼ tsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste
¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste

• In a large pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add shallots and saute until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the broccoli and cover, reducing the heat to medium-low. Simmer 15 minutes then remove from heat.
• Use an immersion blender or carefully pour the contents of the pot into a blender pitcher. Add the cream cheese, tarragon, salt and pepper and puree 30 seconds. Add more stock as needed to reach desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
• Serve garnished with fresh tarragon and crusty bread.

 

Related Content
Just Five: Roasted Broccoli
Just Five: Pasta with Braised Onion Sauce
• Just Five: Leeks Vinaigrette with Eggs
Just Five: Tender Kale Salad with Creamy Avocado Dressing

 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This.

The Scoop: Matt McGuire to open Louie in former Jimmy’s on the Park space

Monday, November 28th, 2016

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{Matt McGuire}

Niche Food Group alum and owner of the former King Louie’s Matt McGuire will open Louie (without the King) in part of the former Jimmy’s on the Park space, as reported by St. Louis Magazine. Jimmy’s closed after more than two decades in the DeMun neighborhood. 

McGuire was drawn to the approximately 2,800-square-foot space because of its size, but more importantly because it’s located in the DeMun neighborhood. 

“That stretch of DeMun has always been a community that feels really good, it has a neighborhood feel. The same people go to the same coffee stores, the same wine bars — it’s been that way for a very long time,” said McGuire. “There’s a number of things that sort of just came together at the right time. My kids are a little older now, [so it] makes it easier for me. … There are just a lot of pieces, both personal and business, that felt like the timing was right.”

McGuire is still in the early planning stages and is currently working on shaping both the design of the space, as well as his specific vision for the restaurant. He wants it to be a true neighborhood spot rather than a destination restaurant. With plans still in the relatively early stages, he’s waiting for work on the space to progress before setting a timeline for an opening. 

Related Content
• The Scoop: Jimmy’s on the Park closes after more than two decades
 A Chat with Matt McGuire

Photo by Ashley Gieseking 

First Look: Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods in The Grove

Monday, November 28th, 2016

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Just in time for holiday shopping, Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods has opened doors at 4180 Manchester Ave., in The Grove. The space that formerly housed Rise (fear not – the coffee shop moved to a larger location next door) has been transformed into a small retail shop showcasing home goods and accessories.

This isn’t owner Beth Styles’ first foray into retail. As The Scoop reported in August, she also owns Parismonia, a vintage clothing store on South Grand Boulevard. At Lemon Gem, Styles turns her attention to cookware, knives, baking tins and more. The shop features a mix of brands like OXO, Cuisinart and Victorinox alongside local artisans like Sprouted Designs, Collin Garrity woodworking and Conscious Apothecary. Styles also offers products new to the St. Louis market, like Skinny laMinx textiles and Short Stack Editions, a single-ingredient-focused cookbook series.

Styles is still putting finishing touches on the upstairs space, which will feature a small children’s play area, an event space and a cookbook nook filled with donated copies of everything from The Joy of Cooking to Cooking Light. Customers can peruse the options and copy down their favorite recipes for inspiration at home.

Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Styles will host a grand opening celebration Dec. 11. Here’s a first look at what to expect at The Grove’s first kitchen goods store.

 

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Related Content
• The Scoop: Parlor to open in The Grove
First Look: Intoxicology in The Grove
• The Scoop: Lemon Gem Kitchen Goods to open in The Grove
The Scoop: Rockwell Beer Co. announces location in The Grove

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Drink This Weekend Edition: 3 Big Black Friday Beers

Friday, November 25th, 2016

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All the Turkey Day leftovers are stored in the fridge, a big pot of turkey stock is simmering on the stove, and you’re contemplating joining in the Black Friday insanity. Or you’re like me: anti-turkey and thus, anti-turkey stock, and more likely to avoid any mall or retail establishment without a strong drink present.

I fully endorse celebrating Black Friday with massive, full-bodied, aggressive Imperial stouts and then perusing the interwebs for fun holiday gifts. Here, three such options to toast a successful Turkey Day and a very happy Black Friday.

Disclaimer: These three options are highly sought after and may be difficult to locate – but for many, this is part of the fun. All three will be available in bottles and draft around the city. Might I suggest a Schlafly Coffee Stout to get the search going?

 

1. Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout 2016 (13.8 percent ABV)
For most beer fans, this gnarly bourbon barrel-aged Imperial stout is the reason for the season. BCBS is chewy, sweet and showcases just enough boozy warmth to keep those toes warm in the coldest weather. Her debut on Black Friday gets those beer nerds out of bed in the wee hours of the morning to start prowling store shelves. Look for deep notes of chocolate and barrel undertones of charred oak, vanilla and smoke.

2. Perennial Abraxas (10 percent ABV)
Now that Perennial’s Abraxas Week and accompanying bottle release is over, it’s time to scour the city for bottles and draft. This Imperial stout is bitter, full-bodied and stacked with roasted malt notes and Mexican spice. The dance of the ancho chile peppers, cacao nibs and cinnamon sticks on the palate is the star of this belly warmer.

3. North Coast Barrel-Aged Old Rasputin XIX (11.2 percent ABV)
In true Russian Imperial stout fashion, this lady comes forth with a boatload of roasted malt that presents itself as espresso and chocolate on the palate. Throw in some dried fruit and lingering char and vanilla from the barrel as it warms, and you have yourself a good time.

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