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Nov 22, 2017
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Archive for September, 2017

Raise a stein to 4 Oktoberfests this weekend

Friday, September 29th, 2017

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Kick off Oktoberfest season with a bang this weekend, from family-friendly affairs to all-day shenanigans.

1. Oktoberfest AB
Join the folks over at Anheuser-Busch for beer like Spaten Oktoberfest and Franziskaner, Bavarian pretzel sticks, German bands and more.
Free admission. Sat., Sept. 29 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Anheuser-Busch Brewery & Biergarten, 1200 Lynch St., St. Louis, budweisertours.com 

2. Zootoberfest
A family-friendly take on Oktoberfest, bring the family along for bratwursts, kids’ games and German tunes. Adults can also enjoy a Biergarten including local national Oktoberfests while the kids sip with root beer.
Free admission Sat., Sept. 30 and Sun., Oct. 1 – 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saint Louis Zoo, 1 Government Drive, St. Louis, stlzoo.org

3. Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern Oktoberfest
Enjoy live music from The Gaslight Squares, a stein-holding competition and of course, plenty of Charleville beer.
Free admission. Sat., Sept. 30 – 2 p.m. to midnight, Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern, 2101 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, Facebook: Oktoberfest

4. Rock Hill Oktoberfest
Fill your glass with Oktoberfest brews from Goose Island, Sierra Nevada, Odell Brewing Co. and plenty more this Saturday – and stick around for a surprise 4 p.m. tapping.
Sat., Sept. 30 – noon to 6 p.m., Global Brew Tap House, 9578 Manchester Road, Rock Hill, Facebook: Rock Hill Oktoberfest

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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Good Fortune finds another home in Botanical Heights

Friday, September 29th, 2017

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Good Fortune, the long-anticipated modern Chinese-American eatery from Bob Brazell, Ryan McDonald and Hannah Chung of Byrd & Barrel and Corey Smale, former co-owner of Strange Donuts, has found a new home once again.

Smale said Good Fortune will open for business at 1641 Tower Grove Ave., in the Botanical Heights neighborhood – just across the street from its former announced location at 1654 Tower Grove Ave.

“This is the third location we’ve said it was going to be at,” said Smale. “It’s been a long road. Although I would’ve liked to have been making money awhile ago, I’m thankful for the way that it’s going. I have so much confidence in this location and in the team.”

As reported by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the building, which formerly served as the headquarters of Hoffmann Brothers Heating & Air Conditioning Inc., was recently purchased by restaurateur Ben Pormeba, who owns several restaurants in the area, including Elaia, Olio and Nixta.

Poremba said there eventually will be a total of three or four businesses calling the location home, though Good Fortune is the only tenant to have signed a lease so far. He said that construction is set to begin on the space next week. Poremba said as of right now, he has no plans to open another restaurant in the building.

Smale said the 1,500-square-foot space will have approximately 30 seats and should be ready to open by the end of the year.

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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1956 Utah will bring vegetarian, vegan pub fare to Benton Park

Friday, September 29th, 2017

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More vegetarian and vegan options will be available in Benton Park this fall. As reported by NextSTL, a new veggie-centric restaurant, dubbed 1956 Utah after the address of the building, is set to open in the South City neighborhood in November.

“I’ve been vegetarian, almost vegan, for 25 years,” said executive chef Christopher Bertke. “It’s definitely better now, but St. Louis hasn’t always had a lot of vegetarian options.”

Bertke, who owns No Class Catering and has worked at area restaurants like Harvest in Richmond Heights, has put together an 80-to-90-percent vegetarian and vegan menu. A few meat-based dishes will also be available, and he hopes to make all dishes GMO-free.

Bertke said 1956 Utah will serve traditionally meat-heavy elevated pub or diner food. The centerpiece of the menu is a plant-based meat substitute he’s developed and refers to as his “science project.”

In addition to vegetarian versions of dishes like fried chicken and meatloaf, the menu will include non-meat variations of such fast food favorites as Big Macs and White Castle sliders. “I hate fast food for what it is, but I love fast food for the way it tastes,” he said.

The kitchen will also have a brick oven for pizzas, and the restaurant will have a full bar as well.

The building, originally constructed in 1937, was a service station in its former life, but has been unoccupied in recent years. Bertke said there would be just less than 40 seats inside, and an extensive outdoor seating area with another 50 to 60 seats, along with an organic garden.

Photo courtesy of Chris Bertke

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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Cupcake bakery The Cup launches a Tiny Truck

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

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Fans of The Cup can now seek out their favorite buttercream-topped treats all over town.

The Cup Tiny Truck joined the ranks of St. Louis’ food trucks in August, selling gooey butter cake bars and a variety of buttercream cupcakes. The truck travels between St. Louis city and soon, St. Louis County, and is available for corporate and private events.

The Cup owner Ericka Frank, who owns shops in the Central West End and Edwardsville and The Cakery Bakery in Dogtown, said launching a food truck has long been a part of her plan. As The Scoop reported in October 2016, The Cup closed its Chesterfield location, in part to further The Cup’s transition to a more mobile cupcake business.

“The truck we have we’ve used in the past for delivery,” said Frank. “For quite a while we’ve been wanting to use that as a food truck, and we were able to do that recently.”

The cupcake selection at The Cup Tiny Truck includes the popular confetti cupcake with French vanilla cake, vanilla buttercream frosting and confetti sprinkles. Seasonally offered cupcakes such as the Pumpkin Harvest – a pumpkin spice cake with cinnamon buttercream frosting and autumn bark from Kakao Chocolate – will also be available.

Frank said The Cup is also expanding into retail sales, selling vanilla and chocolate buttercream frosting by the pint in her shop and in local markets. “It’s really good even just dipping it in pretzels,” Frank said. “It fits perfectly in my cup holder in my car.”

Find The Cup Tiny Truck’s location on Facebook and Twitter.

Photo courtesy of The Cup

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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St. Louis restaurants to raise additional aid for hurricane victims

Thursday, September 28th, 2017

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St. Louis-area restaurants are coming together once again to provide aid for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria victims.

The Hamilton Restaurant Group hosts the Saint Louis Restaurants Hurricane Relief Fundraiser tomorrow, Sept. 29, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Moulin Events. Proceeds from this ticketed event will be split between nonprofits AmeriCares and the Love for Love City Foundation.

Hamilton Restaurant Group co-owner Paul Hamilton said his family owns property in the Caribbean and wanted to support that community. “We have friends and family there,” he said. “Everyone from the Caribbean to Florida is in this, and there’s just so many people affected.”

Tickets are available online or at the door. Admission includes food tastings from Hamilton’s restaurants Vin De Set, PW Pizza, Eleven Eleven Mississippi and 21st Street Brewers Bar and Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern, as well as 11 other restaurants, including Polite Society, SqWires, Cunetto’s and LoRusso’s. and there will be live and silent auctions and live music. Heidi Glaus of “Show Me St. Louis” will emcee the event.

Two of the newest additions to Baileys’ Restaurant Group will also participate: Hugo’s Pizzeria and the upcoming L’Acadiane. “Beyond [the fundraiser] being a good cause and there being people in serious need, we’ve been in the neighborhood with Paul and Wendy Hamilton for several years and we respect them,” said owner Dave Bailey. “They reached out to restaurants in the neighborhood, and the credit really goes to them.”

Lafayette Square neighbor Square One Brewery and Distillery will also provide food and drink at the fundraiser. Owner Steve Neukomm also owns property in Florida and understands Irma’s overwhelming effects on the community. “I’ve been dealing with our condo down there,” he said. “It’s really affected us all.”

Photo courtesy of Hamilton Restaurant Group

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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DTWE: 3 lambics to celebrate Zwanze Day 2017

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

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Cantillon Zwanze Day is this weekend, and the beer nerds are amped. Zwanze Day is Brasserie Cantillon’s salute to lambic and is marked by a worldwide toast of that year’s Zwanze beer. The Side Project Cellar hosts this sold-out celebration again this year, but you can still imbibe a glass of lambic around St. Louis and join in the international toast at 2 p.m.

Lambic beer is the spontaneously fermented, barrel-aged beauty from the Pajottenland region of Belgium, just southwest of Brussels where Cantillon is located. Breweries that specialize in this funky, wild product are highly regarded for their aging and blending techniques.

Although we don’t tend to see much in the U.S. due to the smaller batch size and delicate nature of the product, there are a few places in St. Louis that curate thoughtful bottle lists that often include lambic – some more rare than others.

If you’re looking to add a little funk and sour to your weekend, go explore the beer world for lambic and join this international recognition of tradition and beauty.

1. Lindemans Gueuze Cuvée René
This lambic is Champagne-like with incredible effervescence and bright flavors. Tart apples and funk resonate on the nose while sour grapes and tangerine dance on the palate. Friar Tuck, various locations

2. Tilquin Gueuze (and any fruited variants you can find)
A blend of one-, two- and three-year-old lambic, this mouthful is vibrant with notes of grain, barnyard, stone fruit and citrus zest. Its acidity is balanced, so it won’t leave your mouth watering after each sip. You can try one or all of the past four years of this complex brew at Hair of the Dog.
Hair of the Dog, Facebook: Hair of the Dog

3. St. Louis Fond Tradition Kriek
Wood, fruit and funky yeast undertones run deep with this one and are driven across the palate with a mild carbonation and pretty significant sour character. Ripe cherry and a hint of spice and earth steal the show as you continue drinking this delightfully refreshing beer.
Craft Beer Cellar, cbcclayton.com

Katie Herrera is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and account manager at Craft Republic.

Mike Randolph will open Privado in former Randolfi’s space

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Mike Randolph is finally getting his experimental fine-dining restaurant. As The Scoop reported in late August, Randolph closed his Italian Randolfi’s at 6665 Delmar Blvd. earlier this month. He plans to open Privado in the same space in October.

“It is exciting,” Randolph said. “It took a little bit of time to just get over the hurt of Randolfi’s, but once we figured out what was possible and what we wanted to do, we kept coming back to this.”

Privado will be a fine-dining tasting menu restaurant open on Friday and Saturday evenings for one service of about 15 courses for just 16 patrons. Tickets for each dinner will be available online for $100 each. The first service is planned for Oct. 20.

“I’ve thrown a ton of things at the wall, but I’ve never given [fine-dining] a fair chance,” Randolph said. “We want to be in there two, three, four days a week experimenting, tweaking techniques, processing ingredients.”

He plans to design the space and experience – the plating, lighting, music, even the smell in the room – in ways that were impossible at his previous fine-dining projects (Little Country Gentleman and the Diversion Dinners series), since they took place in other, permanent establishments. “This is no longer a divergence from work – this is work,” Randolph said. “This is a singular focus.”

The bar will be open around weekend dinners, so customers can have a cocktail before or after their meal. A handful of snacks and desserts will be available for those who just want to pop in for a drink as they wait for a table at Público or wander in from The Loop – though reservations are encouraged for bar seats as well.

During the week, Privado will serve as a private event space, available for everything from baby showers to cooking demonstrations, and a kind of commissary kitchen that Randolph’s other restaurants can use when they need extra space. “This will give us a really flexible space,” he said. “We can do anything we need to do within the restaurant group out of that space.”

“We’re excited – that’s the long and the short of it,” Randolph said. “It’s switched from sorrow to excitement.”

 

Photo by Greg Rannells for Mike Randolph

Heather Hughes is managing editor at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Pig & Pickle in DeBaliviere

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Chef-owner Ryan Lewis is putting the finishing touches on his new restaurant, Pig & Pickle, opening at 5511 Pershing Ave., on Friday, Sept. 29.

Those who’ve passed through Springfield, Illinois in recent years may have stopped at Lewis’ previous restaurant, Driftwood Eatery & Cocktail. As The Scoop reported in July, he decided to close the popular restaurant this summer and open an updated concept with a new name in St. Louis.

Lewis, who grew up across the Mississippi River in Bethalto, said the St. Louis market was a better fit for the type of food he wanted to do. He described Pig & Pickle as a “southern-inspired small plates restaurant” offering sharable dishes of veggies, meat and seafood with southern accents like buttermilk biscuits or pimento cheese.

The space that formerly housed Atlas Restaurant received a fresh coat of paint, new floors and barnwood shelving behind the bar. Lewis said he was attracted to the neighborhood’s residential density and hopes to fill the roughly 50 seats with area regulars.

Some Driftwood favorites like the fried chicken and biscuit and pretzel-crusted cheese curds have landed on Pig & Pickle’s menu, but Lewis said he’s looking forward to new items like a gremolata-style mushroom small plate and a charred octopus dish.

Lewis will continue relationships with several Illinois purveyors like Garden Gate, who produces his grits and cornmeal, but he’s also working with new area vendors like Ozark Forest Mushrooms and Theis Farms.

Once Pig & Pickle receives its liquor license, the bar program will feature house cocktails (Driftwood once boasted a 70-drink menu) and local brews on four taps and in 20 to 30 bottles and cans.

The restaurant will open with dinner service Tuesday to Saturday from 4:30 to 10 p.m. with Saturday and Sunday brunch soon to follow. Here’s a first look at what’s to come from Pig & Pickle:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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At long last, Earthbound Beer’s new home is ready to welcome customers. The brewery and tasting room at 2724 Cherokee St., opens Saturday, Sept. 23.

The massive 2,500-square foot tasting room has been a project two years in the making. As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners and brewers Stuart Keating, Rebecca Schranz and Jeff Siddons announced they were moving from their flagship location down the street at 2710 Cherokee St. The space was less than 1,000 square feet and only allowed the brewers to make one beer at a time.

Eight old Earthbounds could fit into the new space that once housed part of Cherokee Street Brewing in the late 1800s. The tasting room seats around 80 on the first level and mezzanine, a feature designed by architecture and general contractor Nathan Dirnberger. The mezzanine appears to float above the tasting room thanks to railings made of tension wire and heavy-duty chains suspended from the 17-foot barrel ceilings.

Read more: Go underground at Earthbound Beer during construction

Behind the bar, 16 taps will pour Earthbound brews and a few guest taps, with another two nitro taps available. A small selection of spirits will be available (still no mixers or ice, the owners noted) with the potential for batch cocktails in the future. Earthbound patrons can now enjoy wine, too, with two reds, two whites and a rosé available by the glass.

Below the tasting room, a 7-barrel system will increase Earthbound’s production tenfold. The space also houses a canning line that will crank out 16-ounce four-packs of staple brews. Caves underneath neighbor 2720 Cherokee St. will allow for a barrel-aging program in the future.

As The Scoop reported in August, Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will helm the food program at Earthbound. The menu will feature smoked meats, sausages and sandwiches, though food won’t be available until November at the earliest.

Earthbound’s new location means new hours, too. It will be open Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from noon to midnight and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Here’s a first look at Earthbound Beer’s new home.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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Recipe: Peach-Bourbon Milkshake

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Boozy milkshakes are a fun, trendy dessert option. Peaches and bourbon are a great combination, and that left me with a fun “free” fifth ingredient to choose. Mint? Vanilla or almond extract? My decision was made for me when I realized the rock-hard peaches I picked up the previous day hadn’t quite achieved perfectly ripe lusciousness. I needed to coax out some flavor and juice, so I brought out the butter and sugar.

 I decided that if I was going to add butter to a milkshake (insert OMG emoji here), that I may as well go all in. That means this butter is browned, my dears, and it makes all the difference. If you’re catering to teetotaling friends or family members, the bourbon can be poured in after you make the shake.

Peach-Bourbon Milkshake
4 small or 2 large servings

2 large peaches or 3 medium peaches, ripe or just underripe
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
¼ cup brown sugar
5-6 scoops high-quality vanilla ice cream, plus more as needed
½ cup whole milk, plus more as needed
4 oz. bourbon

• Bring a medium saucepan filled with water to a rolling boil over high heat. Prepare an ice bath.
• Slice a small X into the bottom of the peaches with a sharp knife, then place them in the boiling water 45 seconds to 1 minute until the skin just starts to pull away from the X. Remove and immediately plunge them into the ice water bath. Starting at the X, peel the peaches, then pit, slice and set aside.
• Place the butter in a large skillet and melt over medium heat. Gently swirl the pan until the solids just start to turn brown and the butter smells nutty.
• Add the peaches and brown sugar and stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and saute the peaches 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is saucy. Remove from heat and let cool at least 30 minutes.
• In the pitcher of a blender, combine the peach mixture and all its sauce, ice cream, milk and bourbon. Cover and puree until completely blended, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add ice cream or milk to reach the desired consistency.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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