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Sep 02, 2014
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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The Scoop: Learning the lingo at The Rustic Goat

November 19th 01:11pm, 2012

The Rustic Goat recently opened at 2617 Washington Ave., half a block west of Jefferson Avenue. The eatery and lounge is housed inside a massive space – some 6,500 square feet – separated into areas that span the privacy spectrum: intimate, secluded soft seating on a mezzanine; a main dining area with industrial elements such as a huge tin can “chandelier” softened by airy floor-to-ceiling windows, candles on the tables and low lounge sofas along one wall; plus two playful, communal rooms in the rear. The room upstairs, guarded by the hanging portrait of the reclining goat (pictured) is for playing board games around the fireplace, and the room downstairs is for pool and foosball. The menu at The Rustic Goat is as eclectic and varied as the space. To get a sense of what The Rustic Goat is all about, The Scoop sat down with owner David Holmon.

The tagline at The Rustic Goat is “Sooo damn tasty,” began Holmon, who is a graphic designer and the former owner of dessert bar and lounge The In Spot. His goal for his new venture was to integrate elements of “fun,” “hip,” “polished” and “rustic.” The latter, he said, came from the space itself prior to his renovation. “It was rustic. I wanted to keep the rustic feel.” And the “goat” part of the venue’s name? “It’s an acronym: Greatest Of All Time,” Holmon said.

All comers to The Rustic Goat should have a great time. The restaurant is open for lunch, dinner, happy hour and late-night, and it caters to these distinct groups not just via the space but also the menu. Holmon called the food “modern food with a Southern twist.” He clarified: “Not soul food. Not country food. But simple fare, down home, tasty.” Holmon developed the menu with his culinary team of chefs: Lee Barken, Ray Carpenter, Kevin Ruck and Britt Simpson.

The lunch menu features salads, sandwiches, grits, entrees, flatbread pizzas and desserts. The dinner menu holds more selections in each of those categories, as well as a handful of appetizers. The kitchen plays up the bleating goat with dishes like braised goat grits, a goat burger and a cheesecake “sandwich” that features goat’s milk toffee. Coming this week are more goat dishes: goat pizza, goat (in the manner of pulled pork) and pomme frites, and a milkshake made with goat’s milk. The late-night menu features items such as shrimp n’ grits, chicken wings served with goat saag sauce, and atypical pizzas like fig and bacon.

The drink menu at The Rustic Goat includes punches, whiskey- and moonshine-based cocktails, Champagne cocktails and mimosas, infused hard teas and lemonades, and dessert-style martinis, coffee- and liqueur-based cocktails. While the list is extensive, Holmon dubbed it “approachable.” He explained, “We’re not going to give you stuff like elderberry or lavender. We’re going to give you something simple, tasty, and you’ll order another one.” Themed happy hours such as whiskey and wings, beer and bacon, and all-you-can-drink wine Fridays along with live music give reasons to grab a drink and sit back.

The Rustic Goat offers valet parking, with free parking available in the lot behind the building (accessed via Jefferson Avenue) and in the two lots across the street. More information about The Rustic Goat is available on its Facebook page and will soon be available on its website.

— photo courtesy of David Holmon

By Ligaya Figueras

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