Hello Stranger | Login | Create Account
 
 
 
 
 
  SAUCE MAGAZINE
|
Nov 01, 2014
|
Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
|
SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
Email | Text-size: A | A | A

By the Book: Allison Kave’s S’more Pie

August 2nd 11:08am, 2014

 

073014_bookcover

 

I think there is something daunting about making a pie, especially one with a fruit filling, which is why I don’t make them. I have made exactly one pie in my life. It was an apple pie, and while it was great, it took a lot of time. Honestly, I’d rather someone else do the work, and I enjoy the results.

 

073014_grahamcrackercrust

 

So for my second attempt at pie-making, I decided to avoid the fruit altogether (even though this is the perfect season for a fruit pie) and go the chocolate route with a S’mores Pie out of Allison Kave’s book First Prize Pies: Shoo-fly, Candy Apple & Other Deliciously Inventive Pies for Every Week of the Year (and More). Kave offers a ton of interesting recipes in her book: grasshopper pie, a Nutella pie, even an avocado cream pie. But there’s nothing like the allure of a s’more: sweet, messy and a hallmark of childhood.

 

073014_ganache2

 

A simple graham cracker crust, a chocolate ganache and a burnished marshmallow topping was easy enough. Kave includes an actual marshmallow fluff recipe, but thankfully she gave me an out when she noted that you could skip the whole mess and just top your pie with store-bought marshmallows. Not every recipe in the book has step-by-step photos, but this recipe did, which came in handy when I thought my ganache looked too thin.

 

073014_finished3

 

S’mores are sweet, as is this pie, but it’s a grown-up, fancy version of the original treat you loved as a kid. That’s reason enough to make it.

 

073014_smoresfinished2

S’more Pie
Makes 1 9-inch pie

Graham cracker crust (Recipe follows.)

Filling
1 cup heavy cream
8 oz. high-quality milk chocolate, chopped or chips
1 large egg, at room temperature
¼ tsp. salt

Topping
1 Tbsp. unflavored gelatin
2 cups sugar
2/3 cup light corn syrup
1 tsp. vanilla extract

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Make the filling: In a saucepan, heat the cream over medium-high heat until it is scalded. Pour it over the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and let it stand 1 minute. Whisk it thoroughly until combined into a glossy ganache. Whisk in the egg and salt until fully incorporated.
• Put the crust on a baking sheet. Pour the chocolate filling into the crust and bake it 20 to 25 minutes, until the filling has just set and is still slightly wobbly in the center. Remove the pie to cool completely.
• Make the topping: In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large heatproof bowl, sprinkle the gelatin evenly over 2/3 cup water.
• In a clean, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup and another 2/3 cup water. Cook the sugar mixture over medium-high heat, stirring only at the beginning to dissolve the sugar, and boil it until a candy thermometer reaches the hard-ball stage (260 degrees). When the sugar is close to reaching this stage, turn on the stand mixer with the softened gelatin (or quickly beat the gelatin in your bowl to blend).
• Once you’ve reached the right temperature, turn on the stand or hand mixer to low speed, and slowly pour the hot syrup in a steady stream into the gelatin while mixing. Try to avoid the sides of the bowl and aim for the space between the beater and the side. When all of the syrup is in, increase the speed gradually to high to avoid splashing, and continue to beat until the mixture is very thick and has tripled in volume, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the vanilla, beat 1 minute more, and then pour the topping over the pie. It will slowly spread to cover the surface or you can use a spatula to spread it.
• Allow the topping to cool at room temperature or in the fridge until it has set, about 30 minutes. If you are using a torch (the preferred method), make sure the area you are working in is clear of any plastic, paper or other flammable items, and that the surface you are working on is fireproof (steel, marble, etc.). You can put a baking sheet under the pie to protect your countertops. Light the torch and start to lightly toast the surface of the pie, going darker or lighter according to your preference (I like my marshmallow pretty scorched, but that’s me!). When the pie is perfectly bruleed, turn off the torch and allow the pie to cool 10 minutes.
• If you are torch-less, you can do this in the broiler, but keep a close eye, as it requires patience, watchfulness and speed. Preheat your broiler, put the pie on a baking sheet, and use foil or a pie shield to cover the crust edges. Broil the pie about 3 inches from the heat source, rotating the pie for even toasting, until the topping is at your desired color. It burns very easily with this method, so watch closely! It’s best to keep the oven door cracked open and watch and rotate the whole time. Remove the pie and allow it cool at least 10 minutes.
• Your pie is now ready to serve, or you can keep it in the fridge up to 1 week. To cover, spray foil or plastic wrap very lightly with oil spray to prevent it from sticking to the topping. For easier slicing, run your knife until hot water first to prevent the marshmallow from sticking to the blade.

Graham Cracker Crust
Makes 1 9-inch pie crust

1½ cups finely ground graham cracker crumbs
5 to 8 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Crumble the graham crackers into the work bowl of a food processor and process until finely ground. Alternatively, you can put them in a bag and whack them with a rolling pin until finely crushed. Pour the butter into the crumbs and mix (hands are best for this) until the butter is fully incorporated and the texture is that of wet sand. Firmly press the crumbs against the sides of a 9-inch pie pan, then against the bottom of the pan (the underside of a measuring cup works well for smoothing the bottom crust). Chill the crust for at least 15 minutes to help prevent it from crumbling when serving.
• Bake the crust 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove it and allow it to cool before filling.

Reprinted with permission from Stewart, Tabori and Chang.

What’s your favorite s’more making memory? Tell us about it below for a chance to win a copy of First Prize Pies. We’ll email the winner!

 

By Meera Nagarajan

Tags: , , , , , , ,

5 Responses to “By the Book: Allison Kave’s S’more Pie”

  1. Kelsi Says:
    August 2nd, 2014 at 11:07 am

    I remember making s’mores with old school coat hanger marshmallow roasters and hoarding any leftover “supplies” later!

  2. Melissa Says:
    August 2nd, 2014 at 11:10 am

    I was in my late teens when a friend talked me into going camping one summer. There were about six of us girls and it was first time camping, but they were all avid campers. After setting up our tents, we built a fire, cooked dinner and then roasted marshmallows and made s’mores. That night I learned that camping was not for me, but I did develop a love for s’mores. What a great memory!

  3. Joe Says:
    August 3rd, 2014 at 11:30 am

    My most recent s’more making memory is my favorite. I just recently made some with my 3 year old daugther. Every day since she pretends to roast marshmallows over her night light :)

  4. Jessica Says:
    August 5th, 2014 at 10:56 am

    This pie looks delicious. I always loved making s’mores while camping as a kid. Getting those marshmallows toasted just right, then straight onto the slab of Hershey’s chocolate. Can’t be beat.

  5. Katie Says:
    August 5th, 2014 at 1:45 pm

    We attended a wedding where there was an outdoor s’mores area. It was such a fun idea on a fall night to do diy s’mores!

Leave a Reply

 

RSS FEEDS
Keep up with one or all of your favorite Sauce Magazine columns
Conceived and created by Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC 1999-2014, Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Sauce Magazine 1820 Chouteau Ave. St. Louis, Missouri 63103.
PH: 314-772-8004 FAX: 314-241-8004