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May 26, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Baked: Chocolate and Orange Olive Oil Cake

May 19th, 2017

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I love a simple chocolate cake, unfrosted with a delicate crumb. It’s better still when it comes together in one bowl and bakes in one pan. The olive oil gives a rounded flavor that cuts the sweetness of the chocolate. When I want an easy dessert to serve to company or have something to nibble on Sunday morning, this is the recipe I turn to.

 

Chocolate and Orange Olive Oil Cake
Adapted from a recipe at Baked Bree 
8 servings

6 Tbsp. cocoa powder, sifted
½ cup boiling water
2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup sugar
2/3 cup orange-infused or orange-flavored olive oil*
3 large eggs
¾ cup plus 1 Tbsp. flour
1 tsp. orange zest
½ tsp. baking soda
Pinch of kosher salt
Powdered sugar or vanilla ice cream, for serving (optional)

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-inch round cake or pie pan.
• In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the cocoa powder and water and let cool slightly. Add the vanilla extract and set aside.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer on medium speed, beat the sugar, olive oil and eggs until the mixture is thickened and pale, 2 to 3 minutes.
• Reduce the speed to low and carefully pour in the cocoa water. Mix until combined.
• With a spatula, fold in the flour, zest, salt and baking soda. Pour the batter into the prepared pan.
• Bake about 40 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out mostly clean.
• Let cool completely before turning the cake out of the pan. Serve with sifted powdered sugar or ice cream.

*Orange-infused or orange-flavored olive oil is available at Di Olivas, Extra Virgin: An Olive Ovation and Vom Fass.

Amrita Song is owner and baker at Mila Sweets and blogs at Chai & Dumplings

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The Scoop: Lemmons by Grbic to give new life to an STL favorite

May 18th, 2017

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{ fried chicken at Lemmons by Grbic } 

 

An old favorite is getting a new lease on life, thanks to the folks behind Grbic Restaurant. Lemmons by Grbic is slated to open on Wednesday, May 24, at 5800 Gravois Ave.

The popular South City bar and music joint closed doors in June 2014 after 12 years in business. As The Scoop reported later that year, the Grbic family bought the building in August and embarked on an extensive gut rehab. The new space has 99 seats, a full-service bar and plenty of TVs.

According to Senada Grbic, who also helms the kitchen, the total investment in the building is just less than $1 million.

“It’s your friendly neighborhood sort of place,” Grbic said. “As far as the food goes, I’m going to do a short, simple menu, things that I love to eat and I know other people love to eat.”

Grbic said she’s excited for the chance to be a bit more creative with the cuisine at Lemmons, which she refers to as “American cuisine with a Balkan fusion.”

Take the 50/50 burger. Because many people from the Balkans don’t eat pork, Grbic uses equal parts ground beef and ground beef bacon, which Grbic said has a similar texture to pork bacon. The burger is topped with provolone and a fried egg seasoned with vegeta, a traditional Balkan spice blend.

Grbic said for the first few weeks, Lemmons by Grbic will only be open for dinner Tuesday through Sunday, but lunch service will soon follow.

Photo courtesy of Lemmons by Grbic

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Three Flags Tavern chef-owner to helm Herbie’s kitchen

May 17th, 2017

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The chef-owner of the recently shuttered Three Flags Tavern has landed a new job as executive chef at Herbie’s in Clayton.

John O’Brien’s first day at the helm is today, May 17. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, O’Brien replaces Patrick Shaughnessy, who took over in March after the departure of Christopher Vomund.

“I was looking for someone who had the type of experience, knowledge and management style that matched up with the kind of business that we do today,” said Herbie’s owner Aaron Tietelbaum. “We’re kind of an old guard-style restaurant and I need somebody running my kitchen that has the capability to understand classics and tradition, while at the same time having the ability to manage a young and excited team, and John fit that bill perfectly.”

Three Flags Tavern closed in March after three years in business.

Teitelbaum said Shaughnessy is definitely a talent in the kitchen, but he wasn’t the best fit for executive chef position.

“Patrick is a spectacular cook, and he does amazing food, but I think it was a little bit too big of a team and operation for an executive chef’s first executive chef job,” Teitelbaum said. “And I hired him knowing that, and I probably put him in a position where he wasn’t quite ready for. He’s got a lot of potential, and he will do something great with somebody at some point.”

Teitelbaum said O’Brien will bring some of the dishes he was known for at Three Flags Tavern, and they will also work together to create new menu items. He said the target is 45 to 60 days for a menu change.

O’Brien said he could definitely see Three Flags’ famous burger and lobster roll making appearances on Herbie’s menu, and due to his penchant for seafood, he hopes to beef up the restaurant’s oyster program as well.

O’Brien was almost ready to pursue a position in Cape Cod when he got a call from Teitelbaum.

“I was about five minutes away from moving,” O’Brien said, but he was attracted to the larger scale operation at Herbie’s. He also has some history with the brand, having worked for Herbie Balaban in the 1980s.

“It was important to find someplace I feel comfortable in,” he said. “I like the restaurant, I like the French style. It’s how I like to cook and how I like to eat.”

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern in Lafayette Square

May 17th, 2017

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{ Charleville director of operations Tait Russell } 

 

After 14 years brewing in Ste. Genevieve, Charleville Brewing Co. has a second home in Lafayette Square. Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern opened its 7-barrel brewery and restaurant at 2101 Chouteau Ave., yesterday, May 16.

As The Scoop reported in October 2016, the new space is a partnership between Charleville co-owners Jack and Joal Russell and Hamilton Hospitality co-owners Paul and Wendy Hamilton. The Hamiltons own the building, as well as surrounding restaurants 21st Street Brewers Bar, Eleven Eleven Mississippi, PW Pizza and Vin de Set.

Charleville director of operations Tait Russell said the 15-barrel brewhouse in Ste. Genevieve will continue to produce the brewery’s core portfolio and seasonal offerings, while the smaller St. Louis brewery will allow his brewing team to play with one-off and limited-release beers. They hope to start brewing in two weeks.

Until then, patrons can grab a pour of 14 Charleville brews, including new offerings like the 2101 Pale Ale brewed with Cascade hops and the Chouteau Common, the brewery’s take on a California common. Four Charleville wines are also available to sip.

Executive chef Ryan Luke developed an extensive menu of comfort food options done with a creative flair, like a lobster corn dog appetizer or chicken curry hand pie. Many dishes incorporate Charleville beer or byproducts of the brewing process like a spent grain soft pretzel or beef patty melt topped with amber ale-caramelized onions.

Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to midnight, Saturday from 10 a.m. to midnight and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Brunch service takes place on the weekends until 2 p.m.

Take a first look at Charleville’s new St. Louis home:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Turn in Grand Center

May 17th, 2017

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{ Turn chef-owner David Kirkland }

 

Turn, the breakfast and lunch spot from chef-owner David Kirkland, officially opened on May 7 on the first floor of the .ZACK building at 3224 Locust St. in Grand Center.

Turn is a study in minimalism. Cool blues, grays and whites dominate, and tall windows on two sides of the dining room let in plenty of light, giving the space an open airiness. The lofty ceilings enhance the effect. Patrons who used to frequent Plush, the funky coffee house/restaurant/performance venue that used to call the building home, will hardly recognize it.

The name Turn has many meanings. It’s a nod to another of Kirkland’s passions — DJing — as are the classic album covers on the wall and the LP-sized food menus, divided into sides A and B. It also refers to Kirkland’s penchant the new ingredients each season brings and turning tables during service.

Kirkland intends to explore new flavors on the menu, like the arepa, featuring grilled corn cakes, chorizo and salsa verde, and some will recognize a few of Kirkland’s signatures during his tenure as Cafe Osage executive chef.

“A biscuit and gravy variation will follow me everywhere I go,” Kirkland said.

Though it’s only open from breakfast and lunch, there are plenty of adult beverages to choose from, including cocktails, wine and beer. Coffee fans can also indulge in espressos, cold brews and lattes.

Kirkland intends to host a monthly dinner series and possibly host culinary event that coincide with theater productions in the area. Turn is open Tuesday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Here’s a first look at what to expect from the newest restaurant in Grand Center.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volanksy

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Sophie’s, an artist lounge and bar, to open in .ZACK space

• The Scoop: French patisserie opens in Grand Center

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Edible Weekend: 3 more events to devour this weekend

May 17th, 2017

Whether you love pizza for a cause, a taste of Maplewood or nip of gin, there are plenty of ways to fill up this weekend. Here are three more events for those who’re still peckish:

 

051617_EW_events

 

1. IndiHop
Try 50 local beers from breweries like Rockwell Beer Co. and Schlafly at IndiHop’s annual tasting between two iconic neighborhoods. Shuttles transport between The Grove and Cherokee Street neighborhoods. Tickets available online.
$30. Sat., May 20 – 1 to 7 p.m., IndiHop, The Grove and Cherokee Street, 314.262.4082, indihopstl.com

2. Vista Ramen’s Anniversary Party
Celebrate Vista Ramen’s first anniversary with a special a la carte menu including cheeseburgers, mushroom sloppy Joes and Thai sausages. Drinks include beer, boozy punch and nonalcoholic beverages. Food is first come, first served.
Free admission. Sun., May 21 – 4 to 8 p.m., Vista Ramen, 2609 Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314.797.8250, vistaramen.com

3. Spring Explosion Pop-up
Bulrush STL chef-owner Rob Connoley prepares a seven-course foraged dinner featuring ingredients gathered from the woods and creeks surrounding St. Louis. All dishes are gluten free and vegetarian options are available upon request. Wine pairings are available for an addition charge. Tickets available online.
$75. Sun., May 21 – 6:30 to 9 p.m., Guerrilla Street Food, 3559 Arsenal St., St. Louis, 575.956.3319, bulrushstl.com

 

Don’t miss out. Sign up for the Edible Weekend newsletter to get the best food events of the weekend delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

IndiHop photo courtesy of RJ Hartbeck

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

Just Five: Red Hot Riplets Chicken Tenders

May 15th, 2017

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It’s a St. Louis thing, like Provel on pizza and pineapple Vess soda. Not everyone gets it. And that’s OK. Some flavors are just wired into your DNA. Just thinking about Old Vienna Red Hot Riplets and a chocolate malt puts me smack dab into sixth grade again. They’re my version of Proust’s madeleine, and I won’t apologize for it. These chips are spicy as heck and just a little sweet. They are a color rarely found in nature, but proudly preservative free. Note that no additional salt or pepper is added to this recipe. The chips and a little honey are all the flavor you need.

 

Red Hot Riplets Chicken Tenders
4 servings

1½ cups buttermilk
3 Tbsp. honey, plus more for drizzling
14 oz. chicken tenderloins
1 5-oz. bag Old Vienna Red Hot Riplets
½ cup flour

• In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and honey until the honey is dissolved. Add the chicken tenderloins and soak 2 to 3 hours.
• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
• In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the chips and flour 5 or 6 times, until a course crumb mixture forms. Pour in a shallow dish.
• Working a few pieces at a time, gently shake the excess buttermilk from the tenders. Dredge in the potato chip mixture until well coated and place on the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining tenders.
• Bake 20 to 25 minutes, then drizzle with a little honey and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This.

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The Scoop: The Vine to eliminate grocery, add juice bar

May 12th, 2017

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Some significant changes are afoot at The Vine Mediterranean Cafe and Market at 3171 S. Grand Blvd. The Mediterranean eatery is in the process of eliminating its grocery selection and adding a juice bar.

“Last year we did a renovation where we removed most of the market and we added tables,” said operating manager Ali Mohsen. “We left a small section of the market, and we’re going to use that area now for the juice bar. Jay International is just across the street. It didn’t make sense to keep on trying to carry the same items.”

He said hookah supplies and fresh meats would still be available for purchase.

The new bar will feature a variety of nonalcoholic beverages. “We’re going to have about 10 ‘energy drinks:’ mixtures of kale, spinach, beets, carrots and things like that,” Mohsen said. “And we’re going to have Mediterranean cocktails, which are mixtures of fruits with custards, honey and almonds and things like that.”

The renovated bar space will feature elaborate tile work and showcases for the fresh ingredients. Construction is already underway, and Mohsen said the juice bar should be running by the end of June.

Photo courtesy of The Vine 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Bob Komanetsky leaves Mac’s Local Eats in Dogtown

May 12th, 2017

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 { from left,  Bob Komanetsky and Chris “Mac” McKenzie } 

 

Bob Komanetsky, the chef-owner of Completely Sauced food truck who recently began helming the kitchen at Mac’s Local Eats, has parted ways with the restaurant, effective Wednesday, May 10. Komanetsky cited “philosophical differences” as his reason for leaving.

“During my time there I developed some good relationships with some great people,” he said. “I think Tamm Avenue is a great establishment in a great neighborhood. You couldn’t ask for a better place than Dogtown, if you ask me. It’s been my pleasure to help things get up and running and I wish Tamm Avenue and Mac’s great success.”

Komanetsky’s departure from Tamm doesn’t necessarily mean that the Completely Sauced truck, which has been on hiatus, will hit the road again in the near future, though.

“It’s an asset that I have and if I can utilize it I will,” Komanetsky said. “If I decided to pursue that right now, it’d take me a month to get up and running.” He added that the food truck scene has changed significantly.

“I was No. 16 out of the gate, and now there are probably well over 80 trucks at this point,” Komanetsky said. “I’m really not sure what lies ahead, or where I’ll land, but I’m exploring several opportunities. One thing that I can tell you for sure is that I’ll always remain 100 percent from scratch, local and high quality. I have no intention of leaving the culinary industry at this point, and I’m looking forward to what’s next for sure.”

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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First Look: Mac’s Local Eats in Dogtown

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The Scoop: Chef Josh Charles departs Blood & Sand

May 12th, 2017

 

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{ Chef Josh Charles } 

 

After three months helming the kitchen, chef Josh Charles has left Blood & Sand. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, Charles decided to redirect his career to focus on his growing family.

Before Blood & Sand, Charles was executive chef at Element. “When I took the job, my wife was pregnant, and we thought ‘We can make this work, it’ll be fine.’ But the second the baby came, we realized it wasn’t going to work. Those first five weeks, I was not there at all because I was at the restaurant.”

In an effort to spend more time at home, Charles has taken a position as a prep cook at Boundary, which he said gives him more normal, daytime hours and a reduced stress level. He said he’d eventually like to get back to his pastry chef roots and delve into making some of the breads and pastries for the restaurant.

Charles said he’s still consulting with Blood & Sand while the search is on for his replacement, and he’ll also continue to create recipes, videos and blog posts for his website. He also plans to do some pop-up events.

“Hopefully now that I have a bit more time I can do a pop-up every other month or so, so I can still work that creative side of me, and work with friends and farmers,” he said.

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Josh Charles leaves Element, heads to Blood & Sand

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