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Sep 23, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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DTWE: 6 rosés for a hot September summer weekend

September 15th, 2017

St. Louis summers never end in September. What better way to combat 90-degree weekends than with a refreshing rosé? Here, six beloved bottles that cash in at $14 or less.

 

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1. Saint-Reine Traditionnelle Dry Rosé
$13. Total Wine, 90 Brentwood Promenade Court, Brentwood, 314.963.3265, totalwine.com

 

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2. Jacques Pelvas Brut Rosé
$11. The Wine and Cheese Place, 9755 Manchester Road, St. Louis, 314962.8150, wineandcheeseplace.com

 

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3. Charles & Charles Rosé
$13. Dierbergs, 1080 Lindemann Road, St. Louis, 314.238.0400, dierbergs.com

 

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4. Scaia Rosato
$12.50. Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Ave., Richmond Heights, 314.645.2050, parkerstable.com

 

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5. Gerhard Markowitsch Zweifelt and Blaufrankich blend Rosé
$14. Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Ave., Richmond Heights, 314.645.2050, parkerstable.com

 

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6. Alloy Wine Works Everyday Rosé
$8. Lukas Wine and Spirits, 15678 Manchester Road, Ellisville, 636.227.4543, lukas.store

 

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7. Axel des Vignes Bordeaux Rose
$12. Balaban’s, 1772 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield, 636.449.6700, balabanswine.com

Recipe: Cloud Eggs

September 14th, 2017

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Cloud eggs are the latest Instagram-worthy breakfast trend. They are so simple to put together, and they make a gorgeous presentation. The egg whites are fluffed up beforehand, so they are soft and airy. The pesto underneath adds lovely herbal seasoning, and the runny yolk provides a nice texture. Serve alongside toast and bacon or sausage.

 

Cloud Eggs
Inspired by a recipe from Rachel Ray Every Day  
6 servings

6 eggs
3 Tbsp. pesto
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

• Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Lay out a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
• Separate the eggs, carefullly keeping the yolks intact.
• Whip the egg whites with an electric beater on medium speed until fluffy and stiff.
• Spoon the fluffy whites into 6 mounds atop the parchment paper. Use the back of the spoon to make an indentation in the middle of each white. Gently place ½ tablespoon pesto inside each indentation. Season the egg whites with salt and pepper.
• Bake 3 minutes, then remove the baking sheet from the oven. Carefully spoon 1 egg yolk into each indentation, then bake 2 to 4 minutes to your desired doneness. Serve immediately.

Photo by Amrita Song 

Amrita Song is the owner and baker at Mila Sweets and blogs at Chai & Dumplings. 

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Build-your-own poke bowl spot Poke Doke will open in the CWE

September 13th, 2017

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Central West End will soon see its first build-your-own poke bowl restaurant, Poke Doke. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, siblings Andrew, Annie, Leon and Steve Shih will open Poke Doke at 8 S. Euclid Ave., in October.

While riffs on the Hawaiian raw fish salad have popped up on St. Louis menus for years, this will be the city’s first dedicated poke restaurant. Andrew Shih called the dish “the Chipotle of sushi bowls.”

After 10 years running Hot Wok Cafe in Chesterfield with his father, Shih said he and his siblings decided to start the restaurant after eating poke bowls nearly every time they traveled outside St. Louis. They also have family and friends who operate poke restaurants in Los Angeles.

Shih said frequent fresh fish deliveries will ensure quality at Poke Doke. “We fly [the fish] in that same day, the second it gets fished out of the water,” he said “Within 48 hours, it’s at our table. Our No. 1 job is to keep everything fresh.”

Customers will build their own bowls, starting with a base of white or brown rice, noodles or salad greens, then pick a protein such as tofu, octopus, raw tuna or salmon. Next, select they’ll choose a spice level for the sauce, and finally choose from toppings like cucumbers, pineapple, fried shallots, Sriracha and eel sauce. Other dishes such as pot stickers, miso soup and crab Rangoon will be available.

Shih said Poke Doke will seat about 30 inside with additional patio seating available. He hopes to be open daily for lunch and dinner service.

Photo: iStock

Rachel Wilson is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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Knead Bakehouse & Provisions will offer fresh bread in Southampton

September 11th, 2017

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There’s a bun in South City’s oven, and it’s due this October. Knead Bakehouse & Provisions will open at 3467 Hampton Ave., the former home of Salume Beddu.

Owners AJ and Kirsten Brown said Knead will offer fresh bread and baked goods to the area. “Our goal is bringing that old world style of bread with a modern American flair,” AJ Brown said.

The Browns started small, selling their bread at farmers markets in St. Charles County. After launching a Kickstarter campaign three years ago and “a lot of different headaches,” they found a space to scale up their production and seat 25 in a breakfast and lunch cafe.

Brown learned his craft after college when he traveled to France for culinary school. His breads use the same sourdough starter, carefully tended for five years.

“I’ve always had a passion for food,” he said. “My family is full of men, and we weren’t into sports but during the holidays, we would be in the kitchen and be engaged in that way.”

Brown said he and his wife embrace “traditional bread roots,” sourcing the ingredients from Eat Here St. Louis, Missouri Grain Project and Heartland Mill. Kneads loaves will include a rich brioche-like loaf and a staple sourdough, Brown’s favorite. “It cuts back to the bare minimum, but it has so much character,” he said.

Guests can expect breakfast and lunch menus featuring doughnuts and sandwiches, respectively, alongside coffee and tea. Loaves and flour mixes for home baking will also be available for purchase.

“Bread is the centerpiece of what we do,” Brown said. “Everything we make is centered around how well it pairs with the bread.”

Photo courtesy of Knead

Caitlin Lally is an intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

September 10th, 2017

From exciting new openings to eight deals for $10 or less, here’s what went down last week, ICYMI.

 

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1. Chef Rick Lewis is bringing his southern food to The Grove. Grace Meat & Three will open Wed., Sept. 13 at 4270 Manchester Ave., in the former home of Sweetie Pie’s at The Mangrove.

 

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2. Get in touch with your inner child at Westport Social, which opened earlier this month at 910 Westport Plaza Drive in Maryland Heights. The cavernous, adults-only space – almost 14,000 square feet – is billed as a “classic bar and gaming lounge.”

 

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3. We kicked off the weekend with a basket of fries from one of the city’s newest food trucks, Essentially Fries. The truck debuted this Friday, Sept. 8, at Food Truck Friday in Tower Grove Park.

 

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4. Pizzeoli in Soulard is now under new ownership. Founder Scott Sandler sold the popular vegetarian pizzeria to Kyle Weber, effective Tuesday, Sept. 5.

 

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5. Got $10 and a friend? Then we’ve got eight delicious deals you must try now on Budget Crunch.

 

First Look: Westport Social in Maryland Heights

September 8th, 2017

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Get in touch with your inner child at Westport Social, which opened earlier this month at 910 Westport Plaza Drive in Maryland Heights.

The cavernous, adults-only space – almost 14,000 square feet – is billed as a “classic bar and gaming lounge” with an extensive selection of beer, wine and house cocktails, elevated pub grub and an adult playground with all manner of diversions.

Patrons can grab a drink and try their hands at bocce ball, table tennis, foosball, or even shoot a few free throws. Those who don’t feel like playing can catch the latest college or pro game of the moment on banks of ginormous TVs or play rock star in the karaoke lounge on the second floor.

Westport Social pairs industrial elements like ultra-high ceilings, exposed ductwork and brick walls with warm wood, metal and leather accents. An entire wall in the front of the space features a colorful mural highlighting Westport amenities. There’s plenty of room for 175 or so to spread out at two bars, tables, patio seating with fire pits and indoor alcoves replete with upholstered armchairs, rockers and couches.

The menu features several shared plates and pub fare like pulled pork or chicken sliders, burnt end nachos and meat skewers. Tacos, pizzas and a handful of entree-sized plates are available, as well. The beverage program at Westport Social is rife with libations from curated wine and beer lists to classic and house cocktails available solo or by the pitcher.

Westport Social is open Tuesday to Sunday from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. Here’s a First Look at Westport’s newest happy hour hotspot:

 

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Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

 

5 bottles of budget booze to buy now

September 8th, 2017

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Looking for quality spirits at swill prices? From third party-manufactured house brands to underpriced hidden gems, here are some first-rate options that won’t break the bank.

1. Great King Street Glasgow Blend
Scotch is expensive. This smoky, peaty, blended bottle from Compass Box is a tasty and economical intro to the heavier flavors of Islay.
$35. Lukas Wine & Spirits, 15678 Manchester Road, Ellisville, 636.227.4543, lukasliquorstl.com

2. El Dorado 5-Year Rum
Made in wood stills in Guyana, this rum is way cheaper than it should be. Five years in used bourbon barrels produces a panoply of flavor notes from dried fruit to caramel.
$20. Randall’s Wine & Spirits, various locations, shoprandalls.com

3. Trader Joe’s The Art of The Still Organic Gin
Not as juniper-forward as a London dry, TJ’s martini-worthy New Western-style gin is clean, crisp and citrusy.
$14. Trader Joe’s, various locations, traderjoes.com

4. Trader Joe’s Single Malt Irish Whiskey
Sweet and floral with just a touch of smoke and leather, this whiskey is aged in oak for eight years.
$25. Trader Joe’s, various locations, traderjoes.com

5. Schnucks Private Stock Bourbon
A 100-proof high-rye bourbon sourced from a well-regarded distillery on Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail, this house brand unicorn strikes a delicious balance between boozy, spicy and smooth.
$13. Schnucks, various locations, schnucks.com

 Photo by Jonathan Gayman

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine.

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Recipe: Harissa Chicken

September 8th, 2017

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Using yogurt as a marinade is a great way to keep chicken tender and juicy. Like buttermilk, the acid in a dairy marinade actually tenderizes the meat and imparts its slightly tart taste to the chicken. Spicy harissa is tempered by the dairy and brightened by the lemon zest. Harissa can be found at most international food stores like Global Foods Market, Jay’s International Foods or United Provisions, but a decent substitute can be yours with just five ingredients. It’s not as complex as what you’ll find at the store, but it saved me an extra trip on a busy day.

 

Harissa Chicken
4 servings

½ cup plain Greek yogurt
2 to 4 Tbsp. harissa paste (Optional recipe follows.)
Zest and juice of 1 small lemon
1 tsp. kosher salt
½ cup olive oil
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs or drumsticks
¼ cup torn mint leaves

• In a mixing bowl, whisk together the yogurt, harissa, lemon juice and zest and salt, then whisk in the olive oil.
• Place the chicken in a large zip-top bag and add the yogurt marinade. Seal the bag and massage the chicken to completely coat. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes or overnight.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for medium-high, direct heat.
• Grill the chicken skin side-down 3 to 4 minutes, then flip and cook another 3 to 4 minutes, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reaches 160 degrees.
• Arrange the chicken on a serving platter and immediately top with the mint so the heat releases the oils.

 

Quick Harissa Paste
1/3 cup

5 to 6 garlic cloves, minced
5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1½ Tbsp. smoked paprika
2 tsp. coriander
1 tsp. red pepper flakes
½ tsp. kosher salt

• Combine all the ingredients in a glass bowl and microwave 15 to 30 seconds, until fragrant. Whisk to combine and let cool. Store refrigerated in a sealed jar.

 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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A butcher’s daughter reflects on her father’s culinary legacy

September 8th, 2017

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{ Marianne Moore with her father’s knives }

White paper, twine and knives. Some of the earliest memories I have of my dad are of white paper and twine and knives. Not the standard perhaps, but as a butcher’s daughter, it was a normal part of life for me.

When I was very young, my dad, Joe Kroupa, worked in a small grocery/meat market. He would come home from work with all kinds of meat – pork chops, steaks, braunschweiger, sausages – beautifully wrapped and perfectly tied. Even after he retired, he continued to trim the meat he bought at home, rewrap it with that white paper, tie it, label it and stack it in the freezer.

He was a butcher – that’s what he knew.

I’d see him in the kitchen, prepping some kind of roast, tenderloin or ham. Trimming, cutting, using his palms and fingers, the knife gliding through, then grabbing his twine to truss or tie, making those perfect little knots. On Thanksgiving, he carved the turkey like a surgeon, making just the right cut. Precise. Deliberate. Every move so effortless. The knife was an extension of his hand, and his skills were incredible.

For many years, he processed deer in our garage for friends during hunting season. It was fascinating to watch, but I didn’t think much about it until many years later. In my first week of culinary school, the chef gave us tasks to assess our skill level. Once, he handed me a beef tenderloin and asked me to get it ready for the oven. Without a second thought, I grabbed a cutting board, my knives and some twine, and I got to work.

I trimmed the chain, the silver skin, tucked the tail and tied it with butchers twine, just as I had seen my dad do for so many years. When the chef came to check my work, he fully expected to see a mangled tenderloin, rather than the one in front of him: perfectly prepped, seasoned and ready for the oven. He asked where I learned to do that. “Easy,” I said. “My dad was a butcher – I guess I paid attention.”

As I went through culinary school, my dad and I talked a bit about what I was doing, but we never cut meat together or really hung out in the kitchen. It wasn’t until a few years ago when I connected with Chris McKenzie of Mac’s Local Eats. He was sourcing meat for a small group that wanted to buy local grass-fed beef or local farm-raised pork. I remember my dad and me driving with McKenzie, coolers in the back, to pick up beef from a processor in Jackson, Missouri. We took a tour of the plant, and I watched my dad talk to the guys. Of course, since he was there, he had them cut meat to his specs. It gave me a view into his world, told me a bit more about who he was.

About a year later, a few chefs and I got together and bought a couple of pigs from a local farmer. “What are you going to do with that now?,” my husband asked in a bit of a panic on our way home. I smiled as I grabbed my phone. I told my dad to grab his knives and meet me at my house – I had a little project and needed his help. When he walked in and saw that pig on the kitchen island, his eyes lit up. We spent the whole afternoon breaking it down in my little kitchen. That day, something in our relationship shifted. I think we both realized how alike we were.

After that, we spent more time in the kitchen. We’d get together on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon and make sausage. He would come over with the pork perfectly cut, and we’d play around with spices until the mix was just perfect. I was always on the grinder, and he was right there next to me, working his magic with the casing – getting in just the right amount of filling and making flawless links. Those days helped me realize I had been out of the kitchen too long. I was working in catering and events at the time, and during those moments with my dad, I knew I needed to do something, anything, to get cooking again. It’s what motivated me to take that leap and join Dierbergs Markets as culinary creative director. I think it made him happy to see I was back in the kitchen – teaching, writing recipes and sharing my love of food.

My dad passed away earlier this year, and I am so grateful to have spent that time cooking, talking and learning with him. It got me back in the kitchen, but it also made me realize that as much as I wanted my dad to be proud of me, he wanted me to be proud of who he was, too. I will always be proud to be the butcher’s daughter.

 

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Photo by Carmen Troesser

Marianne Moore is a contributor to Sauce Magazine and culinary creative director at Dierbergs Markets. 

Short List: St. Louis’ top 3 house pretzels

September 8th, 2017

Is there anything better equipped to satiate hunger and simultaneously increase thirst than the pub pretzel? I haven’t found it. A bready, delicious heft of hot, salty carbs served with mustard and cheese for slathering, washed down with a cold pint, it’s the perfect feast. While the pretzel is decidedly German, it has taken on a life of its own in St. Louis. Here are three of the best house-made pretzels this side of the Rhine. 

 

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1. Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern 2101 Chouteau Ave., St. Louis, 314.241.4677, charlevillebeer.com

The pretzel at Charleville is made with spent grain – that’s the grain left over from the beer-brewing process – and comes out with a glowing, blond hue. The top is salted and slathered in butter, which pools at the bottom of the plate and soaks the base of the crust that’s dredged in leftover grain. The dough is heady with a hint of nuttiness in the aftertaste, and when you pull it apart, it doesn’t tear – it shreds. The rosemary whole-grain mustard offers an initial hint of sweetness, but it is spicy enough to singe your nose hair. Order with a pint of house Half Wit Wheat for the perfect pairing.

 

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2. Das Bevo 4749 Gravois Ave, St. Louis, 314.396.6900, dasbevo.com

Recently opened in Bevo Mill, Das Bevo is already making headway with its pretzel game, relying on the skills of Anne Cronin (the pretzel maker who also sells her goods at the Arnold Farmers Market). These beauties come German-style, two by two, with a hot, crunchy crust that bounces back if you give it a pinch. The extra heap of salt on top means you’ll need nothing less than a pitcher of Griesedieck to accompany them. Enjoy with both house-made grain mustard and beer pub cheese sauce on the side.

 

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3. Union Loafers Café & Bread Bakery 1629 Tower Grove Ave., St. Louis, 314.833.6111, unionloafers.com

The pretzels at this first-rate bakery have a rustic personality. They are handmade daily in the classic knot shape (with a gentle twist at the top) and finished with a lovely scatter of big, square Maldon salt flakes. Less buttery than some, these Bavarian-style beauties take a generous lye bath for a dark color and a thick, chewy crust. The house-made grain mustard served with it is exceptional, but unnecessary since the flavor of the dough unravels in your mouth as soon as you take a bite.

Photos by Izaiah Johnson

Kevin Korinek is a freelance writer and photographer with a passion for making homemade pie.

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