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Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Jennrich’

Eat This: Wow Board at Annie Gunn’s

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

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We don’t know who named the Wow Board at Annie Gunn’s – the staff or the customers presented with a plank piled high with house-made charcuterie, rich cheeses and pickled vegetables, seasonal chutney and ubiquitous Irish soda bread. The dozen or so offerings change daily according to chef Lou Rook III and butcher Andrew Jennrich’s whim, from blood sausage terrine to dry-aged Kobe-style beef. Don’t pester your server for details. You’ll ruin a wow-worthy surprise

-photo by Carmen Troesser

The Scoop: Andrew Jennrich departs from Butchery, joins Annie Gunn’s

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

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{From left, Butchery’s former head butcher Andrew Jennrich and Truffles executive chef Brandon Benack}

 

Andrew Jennrich has left his post as head butcher at Butchery, the butcher shop and food emporium at 9202 Clayton Road in Ladue. Jennrich said he is now reporting for work at Annie Gunn’s, where’s he’s doing a little bit of everything at the Chesterfield restaurant and its smokehouse next door, he said.

Aleksander “Alex” Jovanovic, general manager at Truffles (which is under the same ownership as Butchery), said he appreciated Jennrich’s contribution to the fledgling butcher shop that opened in late summer. “He helped us get our feet off the ground,” Jovanovic said. “I was hoping he would have stayed longer.” However, he noted the unexpected split was still amicable.

Jennrich said his decision to leave came down to a difference of opinion regarding Butchery’s direction. “We saw things differently,” Jennrich said. “I had a great time being with Brandon (Benack, Truffles’ executive chef) and Alex. I miss being with those guys. Other aspects – (It) just wasn’t going to work out.”

Taking the head butcher slot is Ryan McDonald, who joined the team at Truffles and Butchery as executive sous chef in late October. Jovanovic said that despite the unanticipated change, the transition has been seamless since the Jennrich and McDonald had many weeks to work together prior to his departure. McDonald’s primary role at the shop is butchering; two line cooks from Truffles are now responsible for charcuterie.

Jennrich said his move to Annie Gunn’s has been an educational one, noting the restaurant’s quality and talented staff, particularly executive chef Lou Rook. “Lou Rook, Steve Gontram, Vince Bommarito, Bill Cardwell – they laid the track for all of us. It’s cool to work with someone who set the groundwork,” Jennrich said. “They were all the guys doing farm-to-table before it was cool.” Jennrich’s official title at Annie Gunn’s is still to be determined, but he anticipates it will be settled in January after the holiday season.

 

-photo by Meera Nagarajan

Trendwatch: A look at what’s on the plate, in the glass and atop our wish list right now – Part 2

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Click here to read Part 1 of Trendwatch.

 

 

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4. Eveything’s Better with Uni: Whether it’s Peter Gilmore at Quay in the land down under or April Bloomfield at The John Dory in NYC, top chefs around the world are diving into uni. When the sushi chefs at Baiku get their hands on the sweet, briny roe sacs from a prickly sea urchin, they get egg crazy with an uni shooter special: The creamy uni, a quail egg, masago and tobiko (capelin roe and flying fish roe, respectively) all swim in a sake-filled champagne flute. Or, try the spreadable version when Baiku runs its special of salmon with uni butter. The Libertine’s Josh Galliano proved uni has a place outside of Asian and seafood restaurants when he pureéd the raw orange lobes with sungold tomatoes for an uni sorbet to accompany tomato toast. Uni is nothing new to Vince Bommarito Jr. When the venerable Tony’s chef gets the itch to cook with the delicacy, it usually ends up on a billowy bed of house-made fettuccine. And we thought the egg-on-everything trend was nearing an end.

5. A Side of Flan: Jiggly flan always equals caramel custard, right? Wrong. Stop looking for the silky egg custard on the dessert menu and check out the entrees instead. Find carrot flan served on the side of duck confit at newly opened Avenue in Clayton, spoon up the horseradish flan served with rainbow trout at Three Flags Tavern or try Modesto’s goat cheese and salmon flan.

6. Don’t Be a Chicken … Eat the Skin: We all know the best part of fried chicken is the crispy, greasy skin. Recently, area chefs indulged us by ditching the meat altogether and taking strips of fatty chicken skin straight to the fryer. During the summer and into fall, Juniper featured fried chicken skins as a starter, and during a one-night-only event at the CWE restaurant, guest chefs Jeff Friesen of Farmhaus and Andrew Jennrich of The Butchery unveiled their ingenious idea for chicken skin: Wrap it around okra. At Franco, it wasn’t decadent enough for chef Jon Dreja to roll chicken around black truffles and pistachios; he served the roulade with a wedge of crispy chicken skin.

7. Tapping into Local Maple Syrup: Funk’s Grove was once the only local choice for sweet tree sap, but now the maple syrup market is booming, and chefs are stocking up. Just a year after its first bottling, DeSoto homestead Such & Such Farm saw its liquid amber stocked in pantries at Juniper, Dressel’s and The Libertine. New among maple syrup suppliers is Michael Gehman, the man formerly known as Veggie Boy, now the owner of Double Star Farms. Gehman peddles Raber’s Sugar Bush, a grade B maple syrup from Flat Rock, Illinois, to numerous area restaurants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Scoop: Juniper chef de cuisine Ryan McDonald to join Truffles Restaurant and Butchery

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

The meat case is filled with various cuts of locally and regionally sourced beef, pork, lamb and chicken.

{The meat case at Truffles Butchery}

 

After a year as chef de cuisine at Juniper, Ryan McDonald is joining the team at Truffles and Butchery as executive sous chef.

It’s a reunion of sorts. McDonald worked briefly at Truffles before he took the position at Juniper, and he has previously worked with Truffles executive chef Brandon Benack, sous chef Israel Rodriguez and general manger and wine director, Aleksander Jovanovic at Hubert Keller’s former steakhouse Sleek.

McDonald will man Butchery two days a week, assisting head butcher Andrew Jennrich in the newly opened shop. The remainder of his time will be spent helping Benack to expand and rework menu items at Truffles. “He’s definitely going to have plenty of freedom and room to bring his own touch to the menu,” Jovanovic said. “Both Brandon and Ryan have very deep backgorunds in Southern cooking.”

“I’m excited to be able to collaborate and renovate the menu,” McDonald said. “I’m especially excited about the charcuterie and getting my hands on butchering whole cows.” Truffles’ Butchery specializes in whole-animal butchery sourcing from local and regional farms. The shop also sells house-made side dishes and condiments and offers a sandwich menu.

McDonald said his time at Juniper taught him skills essential to taking on a leadership role in the kitchen. “Juniper is the first place where I was able to take the reins and have freedom to cook the food that I wanted to cook,” he said. “(Juniper) helped me develop and mature into more of a chef than a cook.”

Juniper chef-owner John Perkins said he could not comment on who would replace McDonald at his Central West End establishment, but that his former CDC’s talents would serve him well at Truffles. “Obviously Ryan was really important to the growth of Juniper over the past year, and I expect that he’s going to do very well at Truffles and into the future, whatever that ends up looking like,” he said.

Editor’s Note: This article was updated at 5 p.m. Oct. 23 with a comment from Juniper chef-owner John Perkins.

First Look: Butchery

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Carnivores, prepare your grills and break out your roasting pans. Full-service butcher shop and food emporium Butchery has opened its doors. In June, Truffles announced it would add the meat market next door to the restaurant at 9202 Clayton Road in Ladue. Since quietly unlocking doors in late August, Butchery has seen a steady flow of patrons hungry for everything from house-made sausages to premium cuts of beef.

Truffles executive chef Brandon Benack directs operations at Butchery, while meat geek Andrew Jennrich helms the chopping block. Together, they’ve created a unique shop. “Few people in St. Louis are dealing with whole animals,” said Jennrich, noting that Butchery can provide hard-to-find cuts like tomahawk steaks and secreto, a little-know piece near the pork belly, all typically not available at other butcher shops.

While beef, pork, lamb and chicken are sourced from highly regarded local and regional farms, Butchery also makes numerous meat products in-house. It boasts a state-of-the-art aging room for curing charcuterie and offers prepared and ready-to-cook items like sausages, beef patties and pork potpies. Butchery even renders animal fat and sells it in 8-ounce containers. “We’re selling flavor,” Benack said. The Butchery will even marinate your cut for free using the Cryovac machine at Truffles to vacuum-seal it.

Apart from all the meaty goodness, patrons will find local cheeses, myriad house-made condiments, grab-and-go sides, a sandwich menu, a selection of boutique pantry perks and wines that hail from Truffles’ award-winning wine list.

The shop is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here’s a look at what’s happening at Butchery:

 

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-photos by Meera Nagarajan

The Scoop: Heritage BBQ by Cochon returns to St. Louis Sept. 14

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

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{From left, Blackberry Farm’s Michael Sullivan, 2013 Cochon competing chefs Fabrizio Schenardi, Gerard Craft, SPQR’s Matthew Accarrino, Kevin Willmann, Kevin Nashan and Cochon founder Brady Lowe}

 

Pork lovers, rejoice! Heritage BBQ by Cochon is returning to St. Louis this year. The national tour that celebrates heritage breed hogs will take place Sept. 14 at the Four Seasons Hotel-St. Louis. Cochon founder Brady Lowe brought his Heritage BBQ to town for the first time last year, and his 2014 ‘cue fest is set to be even bigger.

The main attraction at the event is a whole hog barbecue competition. Five area chefs will each cook up a 200-pound heritage breed swine to create six dishes judged by a panel of local industry professionals. The lineup of competing chefs is: Gian Nicola Colucci (executive chef, Four Seasons – St. Louis), Eric Heath (chef and co-owner, Cleveland-Heath), Patrick Connolly (executive chef, Basso), Josh Galliano (chef and co-owner, The Libertine) and Lou Rook III (executive chef, Annie Gunn’s).

But the pig-crazed can dine on more than competition barbecue. New this year is Barbecue Traditions, during which area meat moguls will serve a dish exemplifying their take on barbecue paired with wines, bbers or spirits. Look for Mike Emerson of Pappy’s Smokehouse and Chris Bolyard of soon-to-open Bolyard Meat & Provisions to be among those educating eaters on barbecue culture. Other food attractions will include a pop-up butcher shop featuring Andrew Jennrich of soon-to-open The Butchery, a tartare bar with edible delights by Creekstone Farms, a cheese spread by Rogue Creamery and ice cream from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams.

Even though there will be pound upon pound of tender, juicy meat prepared every which way, libations aren’t an afterthought. Festival-goers will can partake in top-tier bourbons, Crispin ciders, wines, mezcals and Goose Island beers, including its rare Bourbon County brews.

VIP tickets are $200 and include a 4 p.m. early admission, as well as access to reserve wines and spirits. General admission tickets are $100; tickets available online.

Sauce Magazine is a sponsor of this event.

The Scoop: Farmhaus’ chef de cuisine heads to Truffles’ new butcher shop

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

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Andrew Jennrich might be feeling a bit out of place today. That’s because the former chef de cuisine at Farmhaus is beginning his first day breaking down animals in a different kitchen. Jennrich recently left his post at the South City restaurant to take butchery to new heights at soon-to-open butcher shop, Butchery, located at 9202 Clayton Road in Ladue.

Butchery, aka Truffles Meat Market, is a sister venue to restaurant Truffles, which sits next door. In his new position, Jennrich will work closely with Truffles executive chef Brandon Benack. “It’s just another branch of the restaurant,” said Truffles general manager Aleksander Jovanovic. While Benack will continue to lead all culinary operations, Jovanovic said Jennrich will have full autonomy in butchery. The GM expects the shop to open by Labor Day with a soft opening in the weeks leading up to the holiday.

Jennrich, a member of the Sauce Ones to Watch Class of 2013, said the work at Butchery would be similar to his responsibilities at his previous position. “The shop constitutes a decent amount of my job at Farmhaus – charcuterie, butchering, doing pigs, chickens, lambs,” he said. “It seemed like a unique opportunity.” Jennrich worked at Farmhaus since moving from his native Chicago to St. Louis in September 2011. “It’s been my home ever since I moved here,” Jennrich said. But the father of two toddlers said the new position would hopefully allow him to spend more time with them.

As Jennrich prepares for the opening of Butchery, his former employer is assessing a kitchen without him. “You don’t really replace a guy like Andrew,” said Kevin Willmann, chef-owner of Farmhaus. “Get in there and see the impact he had on things. Jeff [Friesen] is going to be my right hand now.”

-photo by Carmen Troesser

 

31 Days of Salad: Salad of Smoked Chicken Hearts

Sunday, January 19th, 2014

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Chicken Caesar salad is so dull. It’s time to be adventurous with a Salad of Smoked Chicken Hearts from Farmhaus‘ Andrew Jennrich. Hunt down some chicken hearts, kohlrabi and fennel and challenge yourself. Click here for the recipe.

-photo by Carmen Troesser

Farmhaus to go whole hog on collaboration dinner with Chicago rising chef Nate Sears

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

 

Nothing gets wasted at Farmhaus. The culinary brigade at the farm-to-table restaurant in Lindenwood Park has been breaking down whole animals and using all possible parts in every possible manner since doors opened in 2010. Last August, chef-owner Kevin Willmann, chef de cuisine Andrew Jennrich and the rest of the cooking crew demonstrated their talent with nose-to-tail fare at a she-bang, multi-course dinner. Now, the Farmhaus hands have announced that they are readying for a second nose-to-tail extravaganza, this time, in collaboration with one of Chicago’s rising chefs, Nate Sears.

Sears has worked with some of Chicago’s top chefs during his culinary career, including 8 years at Paul Virant’s acclaimed restaurant Vie and at Andrew Zimmerman’s now defunct Mod. This fall, Sears will be opening a restaurant called The Radler with business partner and friend Adam Herbert, focusing on modern German cuisine.

On Tuesday, June 18, Sears will be in the kitchen at 3257 Ivanhoe Ave., to help prepare a 7-course nose-to-table dinner that will feature menu items like crispy blood cake, pig head runza, grilled Thuringer sausage and vanilla-scened creme de lardo.

Got a hankerin’ for whole hog eatin’? Tickets are $65, plus $35 for alcohol pairings. Seating is limited to 40. Grab a reservation by calling 314.647.3800.

 – Photo by Carmen Troesser

 

Ones to Watch 2013: Food and drink pros with promise

Monday, January 14th, 2013



Every year, we look high and low for the culinary talent who are about to explode onto the local food scene. This year, we found a poissonier with precision, mixologists with mad skills, chefs who hold nothing back and a savory whiz who’s showing his sweet side. They’re young, inspired and just getting started, but don’t underestimate them. The Ones to Watch class of 2013 is going places. Along with our other six picks, click here to read why Andrew Jennrich (pictured), chef de cuisine at Farmhaus, is one of our Ones to Watch.

Find Jennrich’s recipe for Salad of Smoked Chicken Hearts here.

— photo by Carmen Troesser

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