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Feb 14, 2016
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Posts Tagged ‘Baking’

Baked: Lemon-Pepper Chicken Wings

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

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Growing up in Atlanta, an order of lemon-pepper chicken wings was one of my favorite meals. I could usually find these citrusy, pepper-spiked drummies on almost any menu. But since I moved to St Louis, I can’t seem to find the perfect lemon-pepper wing in town, so I set out to make my own.

I tried different variations using lemon juice or lemon zest with black pepper, but none captured the original flavor I craved until I found Penzeys lemon pepper seasoning. This blend uses dried and ground lemon peel that provides a tart citrus zing. Check your label; you may need to add salt if not listed among the ingredients. These baked wings crisp up just as well any deep-fried counterpart and make a bright addition to a Super Bowl spread. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Lemon-Pepper Chicken Wings
1 to 2 servings

1 lb. skin-on chicken wings and drumettes
4 Tbsp. Penzeys lemon-pepper seasoning
2 Tbsp. olive oil
Kosher salt as needed

• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet or jellyroll pan with parchment paper.
• In a large mixing bowl, toss the chicken wings with the lemon-pepper seasoning, olive oil and salt until evenly coated. Spread the wings in a single layer on the baking sheet.
• Bake 50 minutes, until the skin is crisp. Serve hot.

 

Amrita Song is the owner and baker at Mila Sweets and blogs at Chai & Dumplings

 

Sneak Peek: Companion in Maryland Heights

Monday, February 1st, 2016

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Companion is inviting the public into its baking process starting tomorrow, Feb. 2. As The Scoop reported in January 2015, Companion moved its headquarters, along with a baking school and cafe, to 2331 Schuetz Road in Maryland Heights. The 5,000-square-foot cafe seats 66 and will serve the same menu as the Ladue and Clayton locations with a few additions to the bakery offerings like bread pudding and doughnuts.

The airy, industrial cafe has two full walls of windows overlooking into the production bakery. “You weren’t in the middle of the process in the other locations,” said co-owner Josh Allen. “With the exception of dish washing, you see everything that happens.”

In addition to the visible bakery, Companion welcomes community involvement through a teaching kitchen at the new location. Chef Cassie Vires recently joined the Companion team to lead the array of public culinary and baking classes Allen hopes to offer in April. Chef Josh Galliano, who joined Companion as production manager in June 2015, will also teach.

The new Maryland Heights location will be open Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect at Companion’s new home:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

-photos by Meera Nagarajan

Baked: Butternut Squash Pizza

Wednesday, December 30th, 2015

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This is an easy, quick weeknight meal. Mildly sweet squash is perfectly paired with a tangy onion jam and a hint of spice from crushed red pepper flakes. Served as a pizza topping with my favorite garlic and herbs cheese (feel free to substitute goat cheese, feta or ricotta), it’s tasty and addictive. You won’t miss the classic tomato sauce. Enjoy and happy baking!

 
Butternut Squash Pizza
Adapted from a Food 52 recipe
2 to 3 servings

4 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
¾ lb. butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cubed
1 small white onion, thinly sliced
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
3 Tbsp. maple syrup
½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
Coarse sea salt to taste
1 12- to 16 oz.-container of pizza dough
1½ ounces Boursin cheese
¼ cup fully cooked ground turkey (optional)
Handful of arugula
Balsamic vinegar

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a heavy saucepan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the squash and saute until tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the squash and set aside.
• Return the saucepan to the stove over medium heat and the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add the onions and saute 15 minutes, until light brown. Add the vinegar and maple syrup and stir every few minutes until thick and reduced, 15 to 30 minutes.
• Add the onion mixture to the squash and mash lightly, leaving some chunks. Add the red pepper flakes and season to taste with salt. Set aside.
• Roll the pizza dough out onto a pizza stone or baking sheet in an even layer. Spread the butternut squash mixture evenly across the dough, then sprinkle with Boursin cheese. Add the ground turkey, if desired.
• Bake 15 minutes, until the crust is cooked through. Dress with arugula and let wilt, then drizzle with balsamic vinegar before slicing and serving.

The Weekend Project: Figgy Pudding

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

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“Oh, bring us some figgy pudding/Oh, bring us some figgy pudding/Oh, bring us some figgy pudding/And a cup of good cheer!” Most everyone knows that verse from the classic carol “We Wish You a Merry Christmas,” but few of us have actually eaten the heralded figgy pudding.

This dish started as a savory first-course pudding in medieval times, but by the Victorian era, it had evolved into the fruit-centered, brandy-driven dessert that was commonly brought to the table en flambé, decked with holly berries and served with whipped cream or a boozy hard sauce.

 

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This basic steamed pudding consists of breadcrumbs, flour, butter, sugar and eggs. It is then left to the cook to spike the dessert with alcohol, spices and dried or candied fruits like dried figs, raisins or currants. While cooking times can range from two to six hours, less time will produce a moister, less cakey pudding.

 

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Figgy pudding can be served immediately, but it shines best when the fruit has had a chance to soak up all the booze for at least a week or two. In fact, Anglican families in Britain know the last Sunday of Advent as Stir-it Up Sunday, when the traditional Christmas pudding was prepared for the holiday in a week’s time. Each family member gets a chance to stir the pudding from East to West in honor of the Three Wise Men and make a wish before it is steamed and left to rest for Christmas Eve.

This is a great weekend project because with a little preparation, this dish can simmer away on your stove all afternoon while you decorate or wrap presents. It also produces a lovely spiced holiday aroma while you enjoy a nip of brandy and a carol or two. Best of all, dessert is done and ready to enjoy all 12 days of Christmas.

 

The Shopping List*
12 dried figs
½ cup raisins or currants
1 cup dried apricots
1 cup dried dates
1 cup cream
1½ cups brandy, divided
2 cups bread crumbs
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. ginger
½ tsp. grated nutmeg
¼ tsp. ground cloves
1½ tsp. cinnamon
4 eggs
1½ cup brown sugar
12 Tbsp. (1½ sticks) butter
½ cup dark rum or spiced whiskey
Whipped cream for serving
4 Tbsp. brandy

*This list assumes you have all-purpose flour and salt at hand in your kitchen. If not, you will need to purchase those, too.

The Gameplan**
Active Day 1:
Prepare the Figgy Pudding.
Active Day 2: Resteam the Figgy Pudding. Prepare the Brandy Hard Sauce.

**This recipe is best after at least 1 week in the refrigerator, but it requires just two active cooking days.

 

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Figgy Pudding
12 servings

12 dried figs, roughly chopped
1 cup dried apricots, roughly chopped
1 cup dried dates, pitted, roughly chopped
½ cup raisins or currants
½ cup cream
1½ cups brandy, divided
2 cups bread crumbs
1 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1½ tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. ginger
½ tsp. grated nutmeg
½ tsp. kosher salt
¼ tsp. ground cloves
1 cup brown sugar
3 large eggs
8 Tbsp. (1 stick) butter, melted
½ cup dark rum or spiced whiskey
Whipped cream for serving
Brandy Hard Sauce for serving (Recipe follows.)

Active Day 1: Coat a large bundt pan, pudding mold or bowl with nonstick spray and set aside. Fold 2 paper towels into a thick rectangular pad about 4-by-6-inches and place it in the bottom of a large stockpot. Pour 1 quart water into the pan.
● In a saucepan, combine the figs, apricots, dates and figs with the cream and ½ cup brandy over medium heat. Let the fruit absorb most of liquid, stirring occasionally, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside and let cool.
● Meanwhile, in a medium mixing bowl, thoroughly mix the bread crumbs, flour, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, salt and cloves. Set aside.
● In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the brown sugar and eggs until a thick, creamy froth forms, about 30 seconds. Whisk in the butter and rum until combined. Slowly stir the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until a stiff batter forms. Pour the batter into the bundt pan and cover tightly with aluminum foil.
● Gently place the bundt pan in the stockpot, making sure the paper towel stays between the bottom of the pot and the pan to prevent burning. Add more water until it reaches two-thirds up the side of the pan.
● Place the stockpot over medium-high heat until reaches a gentle simmer, then reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and steam 2 to 2½ hours, until a toothpick inserted into the center of the pudding comes out clean. Add more water as needed.
● Carefully remove the pudding from the pot and let cool. Refrigerate 1 to 4 weeks.
Active Day 2: To serve the pudding, place the pudding back in a stockpot lined with paper towels. Fill the stockpot with enough water to reach two-thirds up the side of the pan. Place the pot over medium heat and steam 1 hour, until warmed through. Invert the mold onto a wide serving platter with a lip.
● Optional: To serve en flambé, warm the remaining 1 cup brandy in a saucepot over medium heat 2 to 3 minutes. Carefully use a long-handled match to light the brandy, then remove from heat. Carefully pour the flaming liquid over the pudding in view of your guests, then wait for the flames to die before slicing.
● Serve with whipped cream and brandy hard sauce.

 

Brandy Hard Sauce
1 cup

½ cup brown sugar
½ cup cream
¼ cup butter
4 Tbsp. brandy
1 egg

Active Day 2: In a small saucepan over medium heat, stir together the brown sugar, cream and butter until melted and combined. Add the brandy and stir about 1 minute. Remove the pan from heat.
• In a small bowl, whisk the egg until frothy, then add it to the saucepan and stir until combined.
• Return the saucepan to the stove over medium-low heat and continue stirring until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon and starts to set, 1 to 2 minutes. Serve with Figgy Pudding.

 

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky

Baked: Leftover Cranberry Tart

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

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There are lots of ways to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, but that container of cranberry sauce can seem never-ending. Here’s a sweet treat to use up the rest of that tart side. A crusty, almost cookie-like Italian cake is scented with cinnamon and ginger and baked with cranberry sauce over the top. If you’re in the mood for sweet and savory, lay some brie on top before it goes into the oven. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Cranberry Tart
Adapted from a recipe from Nigella Lawson’s How to be a Domestic Goddess
Makes 1 9-inch tart

2 eggs, room temperature
½ cup sugar
6 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 1/3 cup cake flour
Pinch salt
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. ground ginger
½ tsp. cinnamon
¾ cup cranberry sauce or relish

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9-inch tart pan with nonstick spray and set aside.
• In a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs with an electric mixer on high speed. Add the sugar and beat until fluffy. Add the butter, cake flour, salt, baking powder and ginger and cinnamon and mix with a spatula until combined.
• Spread the dough in the tart pan, pressing it up the sides (It will be sticky.). Spoon the cranberry sauce into the center of the pan, leaving a 1-inch border around the edge.
• Bake 35 to 45 minutes, until the edges are golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature. The tart will keep in an airtight container up to 3 days.

Baked: Tres Leches Cake

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

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To prepare for a recent Mexican-themed dinner party, I hit the Internet seeking a classic tres leches cake recipe. My exhaustive search inspired me to create my own, an amalgam of techniques and ingredients that yielded a sweet, thick slab of milky cake topped with bourbon whipped cream and a dusting of cinnamon. The best part of the recipe is that the cake can be made days in advance, leaving you plenty of time to plan the rest of your fiesta.

 

Tres Leches Cake
Adapted from a recipe at Sweet Pea’s Kitchen 
6 to 8 servings

7 oz. sweetened condensed milk
6 oz. evaporated milk
1 cup heavy cream, divided
1 tsp. vanilla extract
4 oz. (1 stick) unsalted butter, plus more for greasing
½ cup whole milk
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup all-purpose flour, plus additional for dusting
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. cinnamon, plus more for dusting
1½ Tbsp. corn syrup
1 Tbsp. bourbon

• Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
• Pour the sweetened condensed milk into a microwave-safe medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave on low about 3 to 5 minutes, then stir, cover and microwave another 3 to 5 minutes, until the milk darkens and thickens. Slowly whisk in the evaporated milk, ½ cup heavy cream and vanilla. Set aside to cool.
• Meanwhile, butter the bottom and sides of an 8-inch round cake pan and dust with flour. Set aside.
• In a small saucepan over low heat, heat the butter and milk until the butter melts. Remove from heat and set aside.
• In a large bowl, use a mixer on medium speed to beat the eggs 30 seconds, then slowly add the sugar. Increase the speed to high and beat 5 to 7 minutes, until thick and glossy. Reduce the speed to low and beat in the butter mixture and vanilla.
• Sift the flour, baking powder, salt and cinnamon into the egg-butter mixture. With a rubber spatula, fold in the flour mixture just until combined, but do not overmix. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and bake 25 to 30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool cake in the pan on wire rack at least 10 minutes.
• Using a chopstick or skewer, poke holes on top of the cake at ½-inch intervals. Slowly pour the milk mixture over cake. Let stand at room temperature 15 minutes, then refrigerate, uncovered, at least 3 hours and up to 24 hours.
• In a medium bowl, use a mixer on medium speed to beat the remaining ½ cup heavy cream, corn syrup and bourbon about 2 minutes, until soft peaks form. Turn the cake out onto a serving plate and spread the whipped cream over the top of the cake.
• The cake can be assembled and refrigerated up to 3 days. Dust the cake with ground cinnamon and let stand at room temperature 30 minutes before serving.

 

Baked: Mini Doughnut Muffins

Wednesday, November 4th, 2015

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I’m terrified to fry at home ever since an incident five years ago when my pan caught fire mid-recipe. That was the end of homemade doughnuts at our house. I was skeptical that a baked version would capture the same flavors of fried doughnuts, but I was so wrong. Baking makes them healthier, and doing the work at home – in a mini-muffin tin, no less – opens up so many flavor possibilities. My favorite one was lemon curd and raspberry jam mixed together, but feel free to try different jams and glazes as you desire. Be prepared: You can’t eat just one. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Lemon-Raspberry Mini Doughnut Muffins
Adapted from a recipe from Butter Me Up 
6 servings

6 Tbsp. butter at room temperature, plus more for greasing
1½ cup flour, plus more for dusting
1¼ tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. kosher salt
1/8 tsp. baking soda
¼ cup plus 2 Tbsp. sugar
1 egg
1/3 cup buttermilk
1 tsp. vanilla extract
¼ cup raspberry jam
¼ cup lemon curd
¼ cup powdered sugar
1 tsp. milk or water

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 24-cup mini-muffin tin and set aside.
• In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Set aside.
• In another large bowl, use an electric mixer on high speed to cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add the egg and beat until combined, then add the buttermilk and beat until incorporated. Use a spatula to fold the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until combined.
• Evenly divide the batter into the muffin cups and fill them to capacity. Smooth the tops so the batter is flush with the rims. Bake 14 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into center of a muffin comes out clean. Transfer to a rack to cool.
• Scoop the center out of each muffin and use a piping bag to fill the centers of each with raspberry jelly and lemon curd.
• Whisk together the powdered sugar and milk, adding more liquid as needed to achieve a glaze consistency. Brush the tops of each muffin with the glaze and let set.

Add a little cocoa powder to the glaze to sate a chocolate craving. For a cinnamon-sugar fix, melt 2 tablespoons butter in a small bowl. In another bowl, mix together ¼ cup sugar and ¼ teaspoon cinnamon. Dip the muffins into the butter, then the cinnamon-sugar and let dry.

The Scoop: Black Bear Bakery to suspend storefront operations

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

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Cherokee Street staple Black Bear Bakery announced yesterday, Oct. 27, that it will suspend its storefront operation, effective Nov. 1. The cooperative bakery has leased its current space at 2639 Cherokee Street for about 10 years. Loaf lovers need not fret; the bakery will continue production in a kitchen incubator space in the same neighborhood until another storefront can be located.

“We’ll be looking for something that will serve the purpose of a cafe space, bakery, reading room and grocery,” said co-op member Bryan Dennert. “You’re already here getting your bread. You might as well get other things cheaper, too.”

The vision for the new grocery includes selling local, natural foods, as well as ingredients used in Black Bear’s current recipes.

Black Bear Bakery bread will still be available at farmers markets and restaurants while the co-op members look for a new space. For a full list of availability, see the cooperative’s Facebook page.

 

 

By the Book: ‘Pastry’ by Nick Malgieri

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Welcome to the new By the Book, where the Sauce editors choose a monthly theme and pit cookbooks in a head-to-head battle to see who comes out on top. And the winner? We hand the champion over to you in a By the Book Facebook giveaway. This month, we’re tackling all things sweet. First up: Pastry by Nick Malgieri. 

 

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Pastry sets out to rehabilitate people who have sworn off DIY pastry due to traumatic experiences like making flavorless, unrollable dough. Author Nick Malgieri is your cheerleader, creating approachable, basic pastry recipes (including a number of gluten-free options) that are a balanced mix of sweets and savories, as well as strudels and even a quick puff pastry.

As pie recipes go, this one was straightforward and did not require expert skill. A few variations are suggested: crumb topping instead of a double crust, omitting the apples for a blueberry-only version or substituting raspberries and blackberries for the blueberries. In short, the rules are flexible.

The result was delicious, but ugly – though admittedly that has everything to do with my inability to make visually appealing pie. While it may not have looked good, it did taste good. The jammy blueberry filling was a thick, sweet counterpoint to the tart Granny Smiths, and the all-butter crust was flaky and mildly sweet.

The Rundown
Skill level: Beginner. The recipes require common ingredients, tools and equipment. Also, the subtitle is Foolproof Recipes for the Home Cook.
This book is for: Folks wanting to give pastry and dough-making another go after failing miserably in the past.
Other recipes to try: Mississippi Chess Pie
The verdict: TBD. Check back next week when we pit Pastry against Chocolate Chip Sweets.

 

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Blueberry and Apple Pie
Makes 1 9-inch pie, about 8 servings

2 9-inch pie crusts made from Sweet Pastry Dough (recipe follows)
2 pints blueberries, rinsed, dried and picked over
¾ cup sugar
4 Tbsp. water or apple juice
3 Tbsp. cornstarch
¼ tsp. ground cinnamon
¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1 lb. (2 large) Granny Smith apples, peeled, halved, cored and cut into 3/8-inch dice
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
Milk for brushing
1 to 2 tsp. sugar

• Combine 1½ cups blueberries, the sugar and 2 Tbsp. of the water in a medium saucepan. Set over low heat and cook, stirring often, until the blueberries have become very juicy and the sugar has dissolved. Mix the cornstarch with the remaining water, then stir in about a third of the blueberry juices. Stir the cornstarch mixture into the saucepan, return to the heat and cook, stirring constantly, until thickened and clear, about 3 minutes.
• Remove from the heat, scrape the filling into a medium bowl and stir in the spices. Let cool.
• Set a rack at the lowest level in the oven and preheat to 375 degrees.
• Fold the remaining blueberries and the diced apples into the cooled filling.
• Scrape into the pie crust and spread evenly. Dot with butter and arrange the top crust. Attach, flute and pierce the top crust. Brush with milk and sprinkle with the sugar.
• Place the pie in the oven and decrease the temperature to 350 degrees. Bake until the curst is baked through and the juices are actively simmering, about 45 minutes.
• Cool the pie on a rack and serve warm or at room temperature.

Sweet Pastry Dough
Makes 2 single-crust pies or tarts or 1 double-crusted pie

2 cups (260 g.) unbleached all-purpose flour (spoon into dry-measure cup and level)
1/3 cup (75 g.) sugar
½ tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. fine sea salt
8 Tbsp. (1 stick / 112 g.) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into 12 pieces
2 large eggs

• Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in the bowl of a food processor; pulse several times at 1-second intervals to mix.
• Add the butter and pulse again until the butter is finely mixed throughout the dry ingredients and no visible pieces remain.
• Use a fork to beat the eggs enough to break them up and add to the bowl. Pulse again until the dough almost forms a ball; avoid pulsing too much or the dough might become too soft.
• Invert the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and gently knead together 3 or 4 times to make it smooth.
• Divide the dough into 2 pieces, form them into disks, and wrap each in plastic. Chill for a couple of hours before rolling.
• Before rolling the dough, place it on a floured surface and gently knead until smooth and malleable. Form into a disk again before beginning to roll.

Reprinted with permission from Kyle Books

Baked: Tricolor Almond Cake

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

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I recently tried one of Piccione Pastry’s tricolor cookies and fell in love. It’s a cake-like cookie made with almond paste, dyed three different colors, sandwiched with apricot or raspberry jam and coated in chocolate. I usually don’t like fruit and chocolate combinations, but this simply works. I wondered what it would be like in a giant cake form, so I set out to try to make a tricolor cake for an almond-loving friend.

I had plenty to go around and sent many slices to everyone I knew. They all sent me messages raving about how delicious it was. The cake is very soft and not too heavy, despite its density from the amount of almond filling used. Instead of almond paste, I opted for almond pastry filling, which is lighter and readily available in the baking aisle of most grocery stores. I also drizzled a few tablespoons of amaretto over each cake before sandwiching them together for boozy almond goodness.

If you even think you might like almond desserts, bake this cake. It takes a bit of work if you don’t have three of the same pan (I had to take turns baking each layer in my single loaf pan), but the effort is well worth it when you slice to those gorgeous colors.

 

Tricolor Italian Cake
Adapted from a recipe by Alejandra Ramos
Makes 1 9-by-5-inch loaf cake

¾ cup (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, softened
¾ cup granulated white sugar
3 large eggs
6 oz. almond pastry filling
½ cup milk
½ Tbsp. almond extract
1½ cups all-purpose flour, sifted
1½ tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. kosher salt
Red food coloring
Green food coloring
Yellow food coloring
½ cup heavy cream
6 ounces semisweet chocolate
6 Tbsp. amaretto
4 Tbsp. raspberry or apricot jam (I recommend Bonne Maman.)
Fresh berries or fruit for servings

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter 3 9-by-5-inch loaf pans and line the bottoms with parchment paper.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the butter and sugar on medium-high speed until fluffy, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the  eggs and continue to beat on medium-high until combined, then beat in the almond pastry filling, milk and almond extract and milk until combined.
• Use a spatula to gently fold in the flour, baking powder and salt. Evenly divide the batter into 3 medium mixing bowls. Drop enough red food coloring into 1 bowl to achieve the desired color. Repeat with the green and yellow food coloring in the remaining 2 bowls.
• Pour the batters into the 3 loaf pans. Bake 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool 10 minutes, then invert onto a cooling rack and let cool completely.
• Meanwhile, make the ganache by simmering the cream in a small saucepan over medium heat, until the edges start to bubble. Remove from heat, add the chocolate and cover. Let sit 1 to 2 minutes, then whisk gently until smooth. Let cool to room temperature.
• Place the red cake on the serving platter. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons amaretto, then spread 2 tablespoons jam on top in an even layer. Stack the yellow cake on top, drizzle with another 2 tablespoons amaretto and spread the remaining 2 tablespoons jam on top in an even layer. Add the final green layer, drizzle with the remaining 2 tablespoons amaretto, then cover the cake tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate 20 minutes.
• Unwrap the cake and pour the ganache over the top, spreading it evenly down the sides with a small spatula, until the cake is completely covered. Refrigerate 1 hour to set, then slice and serve with fresh fruit.

 

 

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