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Dec 22, 2014
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Posts Tagged ‘Baking’

Extra Sauce: 7 holiday cookie recipes like Grandma made

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Whether she’s your Grandma, Nana, Nonna, Oma or Gram, she probably has a holiday cookie recipe you look forward to every December. This year, grab your apron and treat her to a one of these traditional – or not so traditional – treats. Here, 7 of our favorite holiday cookie recipes:

 

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1. These traditional Italian cookies flavored with almond and citrus are coated in snowy powdered sugar. Ricciarelli will melt away winter blues as they melts in your mouth.

2. For a cookie worth the wait, gather ingredients for Florentine Lace Cookies. Let the dough rest overnight, then drizzle this delicate almond treat with chocolate.

3. Opa! Hailing from the Greece, Kourambiedes are a decadent butter cookie that should find a place in your oven this holiday.

4. Holiday Shortbread is a beautiful canvas for seasonal ingredients like pumpkin, white chocolate and cranberries.

 

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5. Old World Springerles are an anise-flavored, pillow-shaped cookie that, after baking in a special mold, is almost too pretty to eat. Almost.

6. Bigger is better this holiday with these Cranberry Crunch Cookies that can be make regular sized (yawn) or super-sized for extra fun.

7. Black-White Christmas Cookies cover a simply spiced soft cookie with both chocolate and vanilla frosting – perfect for the indecisive sweet tooth.

 

-photos by Carmen Troesser

Baked: Coffee Creme Brulee

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

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This is an elegant and unbelievably easy dessert for any dinner party. It seems like you spent hours perfecting it, when in fact it’s quick and simple. You can even let your guests torch or “brulee” the sugar on top just before serving.

I’ve made creme brulee countless times, and this time I added espresso powder. The result was a lovely coffee flavor that wasn’t too overpowering. The custard is smooth, not too sweet and melts in your mouth, while the torched sugar adds the right amount of sweetness and crunch. Make this for a party, and it’ll definitely be the star. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Coffee Creme Brulee
Adapted from Cook’s Illustrated
4 to 6 servings

2 cups heavy cream, divided
4 Tbsp. plus 4 to 8 tsp. granulated sugar, divided
1/8 tsp. kosher salt
6 large yolks
1 Tbsp. espresso powder (available at Kitchen Conservatory)
1 cinnamon stick (optional)
½ tsp. vanilla extract

Special equipment: brulee torch

• Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.
• Stir ½ cup cream, sugar, espresso powder, cinnamon stick and salt together in a saucepan over medium heat.
• Meanwhile, put the ramekins in a baking pan and fill the pan with hot water very carefully.
• Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in the remaining cream.
• In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks together and add in the vanilla extract. Slowly add in the cooled cream mixture and whisk it together. Strain the mixture through a fine mesh strainer and pour it into the ramekins.
• Bake 35 to 40 minutes, until it is just barely set but the center still jiggles slightly. Let cool to room temperature, then cover with plastic wrap refrigerate at least 4 hours.
• A few minutes before serving, remove and sprinkle 1 to 2 teaspoons sugar on top of each and torch until melted and dark.

Wheatless Wednesday: Thumbprint Cookies

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

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In winter, I’m drawn to tactile recipes that let me slow down and bake nourishing, delicious treats. This thumbprint cookie lets me get my hands right into the dough, stamping my signature into each one. Plus, it’s the perfect way to clean out those almost-empty jam jars taking up space in the fridge.

This recipe allows for a lot of variation. Choose any combination of raw or roasted nuts to achieve your desired flavor. For example, raw cashews and almonds will be a touch sweeter than, say, walnuts. You can also use any gluten-free baking mix; I used Pamela’s Pancake & Baking Mix, which includes a bit of leavening, but isn’t required. Experiment with liquid sweeteners like maple syrup or agave syrup, too, to find the perfect balance of sweet and savory.

Gluten-free Thumbprint Cookies
Makes 3 dozen

1½ cup roasted cashews
½ cup raw almonds
4 cups gluten-free old-fashioned oats or gluten-free oat groats
¼ tsp. sea salt
1½ cups gluten-free baking mix, such as Pamela’s Pancake & Baking Mix
1 cup coconut oil, melted
2/3 cup honey
1/3 cup molasses
1 tsp. vanilla extract
¼ cup hemp seeds*
Assorted jams for filling

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or Silpat mats.
• In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the cashews and almonds until coarsely ground and transfer to a large mixing bowl. Set aside.
• Pulse the oats and sea salt in the bowl of the food processor until coarsely ground, stopping before it becomes flour. Add the ground oats and the baking mix to the ground nuts and stir to combine. Add the coconut oil, honey, molasses and vanilla extract, mixing to thoroughly combine. Stir in the hemp seeds.
• Roll the dough into 1- to 2-inch balls and place them 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. If the dough feels too sticky, refrigerate 20 to 30 minutes.
• Indent the center of each cookie with your thumb, then fill each space with a bit of jam. Bake 15 to 17 minutes, until lightly browned.
• Let the cookies rest 10 minutes, then transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

*Hemp seeds are available at Whole Foods.

Baked: Maple-Black Pepper Cookies

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

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Fill your home with the scent of maple, a lesser heralded but truly wonderful fall flavor when you bake these cookies. This recipe calls for high quality grade B syrup for the richest flavor and a surprise ingredient: black pepper. This spice is such an underrated tool for baking, adding a subtle kick at the end. Since maple can be rather sweet, pepper tempers it nicely.

These crisp buttery cookies are perfect for dipping in afternoon tea in the afternoon, a light dessert or even a great addition to your holiday cookie party. Enjoy and happy baking!
Maple-Black Pepper Cookies
Adapted from a Gourmet recipe
Makes about 30

2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
¾ cup granulated sugard
½ cup grade B maple syrup
1 large egg yolk
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

• In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a hand mixer, beat together the butter and sugar on medium-high until fluffy and light in color, about 5 minutes. Add the yolk and the maple syrup and beat again until combined.
• Use a spatula to fold in the flour, salt and pepper, until a slightly clumpy dough forms, using your hands if necessary. Form the dough into a ball, wrap in plastic and chill for at least 2 hours and up to 4 days.
• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line baking sheets with parchment paper.
• Roll out the dough on a floured surface to 1/8-inch thickness and use cookie cutters to create various shapes. Place cookies on the baking sheets and reroll the dough as needed until it is all used.
• Bake 8 to 11 minutes, until the edges are golden. Let cool completely on a wire rack. Cookies will keep in an airtight container about 1 week in the refrigerator and up to 1 month in the freezer.

Wheatless Wednesday: Healthy Chinese Almond Cookies

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

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The holiday season is a dangerous time for me. When confronted with a tray of sweets, I’ve been known to channel Cookie Monster (“C is for cookie, that’s good enough for me!”). Those overly processed, sugary treats are addictive, and I quickly learned that I would need a healthier alternative to stave off the cookie massacre.

Everyone can use a recipe for those times we crave a treat without spiking our blood sugar levels. I find when I bake with higher protein flours, less sugar and minimally processed ingredients, I am more satisfied with just a couple cookies rather than the whole tray. These almond flour cookies are a healthy, simplified version of the traditional Chinese dessert, sweetened with just enough honey and almond extract to make the taste buds tingle. This dough is easy to work with and doesn’t contain raw eggs, so lick the that spoon guilt-free. For holiday flair, replace the vanilla and almond extracts with peppermint extract and swap whole almonds with crushed peppermint candies.

 

Healthy Chinese Almond Cookies
Makes 18 to 20

¼ cup extra-virgin coconut oil, melted
⅓ cup raw honey
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 tsp. almond extract
1⅓ cups (135 g.) almond flour*
2 Tbsp. (15 g.) coconut flour
¼ tsp. sea salt
½ tsp. baking soda
18 to 20 whole raw almonds

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
• In a medium bowl, whisk together the coconut oil, honey, vanilla extract and almond extract until well combined. Add the almond flour, coconut flour, salt and baking soda and stir until a firm dough comes together. It should be able to roll into a ball. If not, refrigerate up to 30 minutes.
• Roll the dough into 18 to 20 1-inch balls and place them on a baking sheet 1 inch apart. Press 1 almond into the center of each cookie. Bake 10 minutes, until edges start to lightly brown. Let the cookies cool slightly then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

*I advise weighing any nut flours to prevent inaccurate measurements.

 

Baked: Apple Crisp-Stuffed Apples

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

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I’m not a huge fan of cooked apples, which is why you don’t see many recipes using them on Baked. However, I can’t say the same for my better half, and since this fall fruit is in abundance right now, this apples-on-apples dessert seemed appropriate for a dinner party.

These were a huge hit. Scooping out the apple innards took a bit of work, but they definitely wowed our guests. Whatever you do, don’t skip the cinnamon ice cream, which really takes these beauties over the top. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

 
Apple Crisp-Stuffed Apples
Adapted from Creme de la Crumb
4 servings

4 large apples (I used Jonagolds.)
2 medium apples, peeled, cored and chopped (I used Jonathans.)
6 Tbsp. cold butter, cubed, divided
¼ cup maple syrup
¼ cup plus 2 Tbsp. brown sugar, divided
Pinch cloves
Pinch nutmeg
¼ tsp. plus a pinch cinnamon, divided
½ cup flour
¼ cup oats
¼ tsp. kosher salt
Cinnamon Ice Cream (recipe follows)

• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
• Use a sharp paring knife and a spoon to carefully core and scoop out the insides of the large apples, leaving the bottom of the apple intact. Set the hollowed out apples aside. Discard the core. Reserve the scooped-out fruit.
• In a large pan over medium-high heat, saute the reserved apple pieces, the chopped medium apples, 3 tablespoons butter, maple syrup, brown sugar, cloves, nutmeg and a pinch of cinnamon until the apples are warm and cooked, about 8 minutes.
• Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl, combine the remaining 3 tablespoons butter, flour, oats, the remaining ¼ teaspoon cinnamon and salt together until crumbly. Set aside.
• Divide the warm apple filling evenly between the 4 hollow apples, then cover each evenly with the oat crisp topping. Bake 25 minutes and serve warm with cinnamon ice cream.

Cinnamon Ice Cream
Adapted from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at Home
Makes about 1 quart

1½ oz. cream cheese
Pinch kosher salt
1 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. cornstarch
2 cups milk
1¼ cup heavy cream
⅔ cup sugar
2 Tbsp. corn syrup
1 heaping tsp. cinnamon

Special equipment: ice cream maker

• Place the cream cheese and the salt in a large bowl and set aside.
• Place 2 tablespoons milk in a small bowl and whisk in the cornstarch until dissolved to create a slurry. Set aside.
• In a large saucepan, whisk the cream, the remaining milk, corn syrup, sugar and cinnamon over medium-low heat until the liquid is steaming and the sugar is dissolved, 3 to 5 minutes. When the mixture begins to bubble, reduce the heat to low and simmer 3 to 4 minutes.
• Whisk in the slurry, raise the heat to medium and continue to whisk. Bring to simmer and let thicken 2 to 4 minutes.
• Remove from the heat and pour over the cream cheese. Let sit 1 minute, then whisk until the cream cheese is melted. Let the mixture cool completely, then pour into an ice cream maker and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions.
• Scoop the ice cream into an airtight container and freeze at least 4 hours before serving.

 

 

Wheatless Wednesday: Brown Butter-Apple-Ginger-Carrot Muffins

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

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True, this recipe title does sound a bit overwhelming. I considered calling these “Refrigerator Muffins” or “Kitchen Sink Muffins,” but those names conjured up mental images of old fruit and veggies, expired flours and honey jars dotted with stale breadcrumbs – not what I picture when I imagine a complex, gluten-free muffin.

Instead, this recipe – despite its lengthy moniker – exudes fall. Ginger and honey balance and lighten the crisp fall flavors of apples and carrots. Add hints of fresh herbs, and this exquisite muffin is perfect for breakfast or a sweet-savory snack.

These muffins are very moist and a bit gooey in the center, unlike cake-y, glutinous muffins. Be sure to let the muffins cool before serving, which allows the inside to set, then slather with your favorite fall jam or butter.

Baking gluten-free muffins is just as simple as the standard variety, especially with the plethora of gluten-free baking mixes on the shelves today. I used Andrea’s Gluten-Free super-fine grind flour blend, but any gluten-free flour blend will work.

 

Brown Butter-Apple-Ginger-Carrot Muffins
12 servings

5 oz. butter
1 large apple, peeled, cored and grated
1 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and grated
2 eggs
1/3 cup honey
1½ tsp. vanilla extract
1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp. plain full-fat yogurt
1 cup gluten-free flour blend
½ cup almond flour
1½ tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. sea salt
1/3 cup coconut sugar or brown sugar
½ tsp. ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp. ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp. ground cardamom
1/8 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 large carrots, peeled and grated
2 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary
2 tsp. chopped fresh sage

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease the cups of a 12-cup muffin pan.
• In a cast-iron or heavy-bottomed skillet, brown the butter over medium-high heat until the solids start to turn dark gold and the butter smells nutty, shaking the skillet often to keep it from burning, 7 to 8 minutes.
• Add the grated apple and ginger and saute 5 to 7 minutes, until light brown and soft. Remove from heat and set aside.
• In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, honey, vanilla and yogurt. Add the cooked apples and ginger, using a rubber spatula to scrape all the browned butter into the mixture. Stir to combine and set aside.
• In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the gluten-free flour, almond flour, baking powder, salt, coconut sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom and black pepper. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix well. Fold in the carrots, rosemary and sage.
• Fill each cup in the muffin tin two-thirds high with batter. Bake 30 minutes.
• Remove from the oven and let rest in the muffin pan 3 to 5 minutes, then carefully remove the muffins from the pan and let cool completely on a wire rack. Serve with jam and butter.

Baked: Matcha-glazed Brownies

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

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Moving uncovers all manner of hidden ingredients. While packing up my pantry recently, I found a bag of verdant green matcha, powdered green tea with plenty of health benefits. In small doses, it adds a lovely bitter note to sweet treats. I’ve added matcha to many desserts, often pairing it with white chocolate or fruit, and I decided to give it a go in a brownie.

I topped these sweet, fudgy squares with a barely bitter matcha glaze. A little goes a long way here; just one tablespoon of matcha powder was enough for the entire batch. A small bag (available at most international grocery stores) will last year. Balance that strong bitter taste with honey and powdered sugar to create a luscious green glaze and sprinkle the top with black and white sesame seeds.

These could be great, easy Halloween treat – the color reminded me of Frankenstein’s monster! Enjoy and happy baking!

Matcha-glazed Brownies
Adapted from a recipe on My Name is Yeh
12 servings

11 Tbsp. butter, melted, divided
¾ cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
½ cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup cocoa powder
¼ tsp. kosher salt
¼ tsp. baking powder
1 Tbsp. honey
1 Tbsp. matcha powder
1 cup powdered sugar
Black sesame seeds for garnish
White sesame seeds for garnish

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line an 8-by-8-inch baking pan with parchment paper.
• Add 8 tablespoons butter to a large mixing bowl. Using a hand mixer, beat in the granulated sugar, vanilla and the eggs until it turns pale, 2 to 3 minutes. Sift the flour, cocoa powder, salt and baking powder into the wet ingredients and stir together with a rubber spatula until combined.
• Pour the batter into the pan and bake 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes with a few crumbs clinging to it.
• To make the matcha glaze, melt the remaining 3 tablespoons butter, honey, matcha powder and powdered sugar in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring until combined. Pour the glaze over the warm brownies and spread it with a spatula. Sprinkle the top with black and white sesame seeds. Let cool completely before slicing.

Extra Sauce: Companion’s Josh Allen enters bread battle to compete in World Cup of Baking

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

Every four years, the world goes wild for international competition. Participants train endlessly, all vying for the chance to represent their countries on the grandest of stages. No, we’re not talking about the Olympics or the World Cup. We’re talking about a more delicious and mouthwatering sport: the World Cup of Baking, or the Coupe du Monde de la Boulangerie.

The top three bakers from each country’s team will gather in Paris in March 2016 to be judged on bread, Viennese pastries, a savory sandwich presentation and an artistic piece. But before they go head-to-head in international competition, they have to make their national team. St. Louis’ own Josh Allen, owner of Companion, is one of 15 bakers fighting for a coveted spot tomorrow and Friday, Oct. 23 and 24, at the next round of competition in Providence, Rhode Island. If selected, Allen will be the first St. Louis baker to compete in the World Cup.

Since August, Allen has spent nearly every Friday at the Ladue Companion Cafe from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., elbow-deep in dough, testing new recipes and learning along the way. We popped by one of his final practice sessions to get the inside look at how a baker prepares for the tryout of a lifetime.

Allen is required to present five types of bread: a traditional and decorative baguette, a sourdough-based option, a nutritional loaf, and two freestyle breads of his creation. All five must be completed in eight hours and match precise weight and shape requirements.

 

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Since the judges will taste the bread straight from the oven, Allen has changed his usual methods, which focus on preparing bread consumed 12 hours later. “(I) found that the amount of thyme or rosemary has to be cut way back because it’s so floral initially,” Allen said.

Allen wanted to create breads that stand alone, almost as a meal. Each bite should be a sensory overload, he explained.

 

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The nutritional bread (pictured below), which contains more than 50 percent whole-grain flour, has the comforting aroma of chamomile dust. Mixed throughout the dough are quinoa and wild rice, as well as sweet-tart, crunchy pomegranate seeds.

 

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The classic baguette (below) is Allen’s favorite.

 

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Allen elevated the average sourdough (below) by using semolina flour studded with fennel and sesame seeds and brown butter to gild the lily.

 

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The first freestyle bread (below, left) is an ode to fall: chunks of apple and toasted walnut are folded into a thyme- and apple cider-infused rye dough topped with barley for crunch. He kicks up the heat with his second freestyle bread (below, right): an airy polenta bread with briny green olives, aromatic rosemary, bright orange zest, and a zip of red pepper.

 

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Allen expects to hear the results of this round in two weeks or so. If he succeeds, he will move to the final round of competition in March 2015, when the top three compete again to earn the coveted bread baker slot on the three-person team. “I’m as ready to go as I can be,” Allen said the day before competition. “There’s no telling what will resonate with the judges … I’m very excited about it. It’s been a great experience, but it’s been enough work that you want to do well.”

Spencer Perinkoff blogs at Whiskey and Soba

-story and photos by Spencer Pernikoff

Baked: Macaron Cake

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

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A macaron cake can be many things. It could be a cake decorated with macarons. It could be a layer of macarons inside a cake (note to self: try this). But today, a macaron cake means a giant, delicious, cake-sized macaron. When my friend requested this for his birthday, I was excited for the challenge, but I never expected it to be so tasty. I ended up making it twice in two days because we couldn’t get enough!

Even if you’re new to making macarons, this recipe is slightly less stressful since the focus won’t be on those pesky “feet”. If your macaron cracks or looks ugly, it can easily be masked with a pile of fresh fruit and a gentle sift of powdered sugar. It’s far less fussy than making traditional French macarons, but it’s still a show-stopping stunning dessert. (A quick note: You must weigh the ingredients for the macarons; the measurements are that exact.)

The Earl Grey cream filling pairs perfectly with a pistachio macaron base. If you don’t want to indulge in bergamot extract, you can easily substitute vanilla or experiment with any flavor. I imagine this would be delicious with some zesty citrus extracts or even rose or lavender. Enjoy and happy baking!
Macaron Cake
8 servings

For the macarons:
100 g. egg whites (about 3 eggs)
35 g. granulated sugar
200 g. powdered sugar, plus more for dusting
80 g. almond flour
40 g. pistachio flour (available here)

For the filling:
3 egg yolks
½ cup sugar
¼ cup water
1½ sticks unsalted butter, room temperature, cubed
1½ tsp. bergamot extract (available here)
1 tsp. ground Earl Grey tea leaves
Fresh berries for garnish

Special equipment: a candy or deep fry thermometer

• Use an 8-inch plate to trace 2 circles on pieces of parchment paper with a dark marker. Flip them over and place on two baking sheets. Set aside.
• To make the macarons, whip the egg whites and sugar on high using a stand mixer or hand mixer until stiff. The egg whites should not move when the bowl is turned upside-down.
• Sift the powdered sugar, almond flour and pistachio flour into the bowl and fold in the ingredients, gently removing air from the batter so it flattens and slowly spreads after mixing. Pour the batter into a pastry bag fitted with a round tip.
• Hold the bag perpendicularly a few inches above the circle on the baking sheet. Staring at the center of the circle, slowly pipe the batter in a spiral, leaving a tiny amount of space for the batter to spread and combine to create a disc.
• Hold the bag in the same manner over the second baking sheet, but this time, outline the circle. Pipe another circle just inside the first to create a ring, leaving the center empty.
• Firmly tap each baking sheet on the counter to release any air bubbles. Let the batter rest 20 to 30 minutes, until the tops are dry to the touch.
• Move the oven rack to the center and preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Place the baking sheets in the center of the oven and prop the oven door open with a wooden spoon to let some air escape. Bake the ring 16 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through so it bakes evenly. Bake the circle 24 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through so it bakes evenly.
• Carefully slide the parchment paper off the baking sheets and onto the counter to let the macarons cool completely before touching.
• Meanwhile, make the filling by placing the yolks in the bowl of a stand mixer.
• Place the sugar and water in a saucepan over medium-high heat and do not stir. When the mixture reaches exactly 232 degrees, turn the stand mixer on high and drizzle the syrup into the bowl. Beat 1 or 2 minutes until combined, then let rest until it reaches room temperature.
• Beat in the butter, bergamot extract and tea leaves on high until the mixture comes together in smooth, frosting-like consistency, about 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape the cream into the pastry bag and set aside.
• Once the maracons have cooled, gently place the serving plate on top of the disc-shaped macaron and invert it onto the plate. Peel off the parchment paper and pipe the pastry cream in a circle to cover the entire base. Gently lift the ring-shaped macaron off the parchment paper, peeling it as you go and supporting the bottom with your hands. Carefully place the ring atop the pastry cream.
• Fill the hole in the center with fresh berries and sift powdered sugar over the top. The macaron cake will keep, covered, 1 to 2 days.

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