Hello Stranger | Login | Create Account
 
 
 
 
 
  SAUCE MAGAZINE
|
Jan 23, 2018
|
Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
|
SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
Email | Text-size: A | A | A

Posts Tagged ‘beignets’

Recipe: Cranberry Beignets

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

112217_baked

 

Let’s face it: Everyone has cranberry sauce leftover after a Thanksgiving meal. You’d notice if it was missing from the table, but there’s only so much you can take of its sweet-tartness when the rest of your plate is piled high with comfort food. So what to do with the extra sauce? I’m here to help.

I intended to make jelly doughnuts, but I couldn’t find my round cookie cutter, so I had to use my square one instead. To my surprise, the only difference between beignets and doughnuts are their shape … so I made beignets!

Jelly-filled beignets can be made the night before and refrigerated to rise overnight, or you can start them earlier in the morning in time for a late weekend brunch. They are adaptable; swap the citrus zest for a teaspoon of vanilla or almond extract. Fill them with leftover cranberry sauce, toss them in sugar and serve immediately to people you love.

 

Cranberry Beignets
Adapted from a recipe at Smitten Kitchen 
8 to 10 servings

3 oz. lukewarm milk
2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1¼ tsp. active dry yeast
1 egg yolk
Zest of half a lemon or orange
1 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 cup plus 2½ Tbsp. all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
Pinch of kosher salt
Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
½ cup cranberry sauce
Powdered sugar to coat

• Mix the milk, sugar and yeast in a large bowl and let sit for 5 minutes, until it starts to foam.
• Whisk in the yolk, zest and butter until combined. Add the flour and the salt, then mix with your hands to bring the dough together into a sticky ball. Transfer it to a well-oiled mixing bowl and let rise in a dark corner about 1 hour.
• On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough about 2 inches thick. Use a square cookie cutter or sharp knife to cut 2-by-2-inch squares and place on a cookie sheet. Cover with oiled plastic wrap and let rise in a dark corner 2 to 4 hours or refrigerate overnight.
• In a large high-sided pan, preheat 2 inches oil to 350 degrees over medium heat. If you don’t have a thermometer, check if the oil is ready by placing a wooden spoon handle into the hot oil. When bubbles form around it, the oil is ready.
• Working in batches, fry 3 to 4 beignets about 30 seconds to 1 minute, then carefully flip and fry another 30 seconds to 1 minute, until browned all over. Use a spider to remove the doughnuts and drain on a paper-towel lined plate and let cool. Repeat with the remaining dough.
• Fill a piping bag fitted with a round nozzle with cranberry sauce. Poke a hole into the side of the doughnuts with the nozzle, then gently fill with cranberry sauce until a bit of jam sticks out.
• Serve immediately covered in sifted powdered sugar.

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who blogs at A Song in Motion

Related Content
• Recipe: Leftover Cranberry Tart

• Recipe: Leftover Turkey Cuban

• Recipe: Cranberry-Fig Chutney

 

Trendwatch: A look at what’s on the plate, in the glass and atop our wish list right now – Part 1

Monday, December 8th, 2014

12114_trendwatch

 

1. Fishy Doughnuts: French fritters stuffed with fish and seafood have been washing up on menus all over town. Even if you missed Niche’s smoked trout beignets with sorghum butter and chives, you can still bite into beer-battered brandade beignets of salted cod, potatoes and garlic at Urban Chestnut’s Brewery & Bierhall in The Grove, lobster beignets at Three Flags Tavern and spicy crab beignets at Vin de Set. The classic French market doughnut has never tasted so much like the sea.

2. Top Muffins: What could go better with eggs than a homemade English muffin? You don’t have to head to David Chang’s Momofuku Ko to get a killer house-made version. Restaurants like Death in the Afternoon and Winslow’s Home ditched the bag of Thomas brand rounds and baked their own. Grab a fried egg sandwich at Winslow’s to experience the difference. And any time you eye the sporadically available English muffin at microbakery Comet Coffee, snatch it. Prepare to become an English muffin addict when cafe-bakery Union Loafers opens (“Soon!” promised owner-baker Ted Wilson.). Look for the breakfast staple at the Botanical Heights shop along with a bialy, a Polish roll that’s a cross between an English muffin and a bagel.

3. Forest on the Plate: Cooking with conifer is an art form at René Redzepi’s restaurant, Noma, in Copenhagen, and pine has popped up on plates here at home, too, at places like Sidney Street Cafe, where spruce oil brightened pistachio-encrusted scallops, or Blood & Sand, where they’re grinding toasted juniper berries to season chicharrónes. Also spied at B&S: an Asian pear salad with a buttermilk-juniper sauce and juniper-hemp seed crumble.

Check back tomorrow for Part 2 of Trendwatch.

 

 

 

 

RSS FEEDS
Keep up with one or all of your favorite Sauce Magazine columns
Conceived and created by Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC 1999-2018, Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Sauce Magazine 1820 Chouteau Ave. St. Louis, Missouri 63103.
PH: 314-772-8004 FAX: 314-241-8004