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Nov 18, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘breakfast’

Recipe: Cloud Eggs

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

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Cloud eggs are the latest Instagram-worthy breakfast trend. They are so simple to put together, and they make a gorgeous presentation. The egg whites are fluffed up beforehand, so they are soft and airy. The pesto underneath adds lovely herbal seasoning, and the runny yolk provides a nice texture. Serve alongside toast and bacon or sausage.

 

Cloud Eggs
Inspired by a recipe from Rachel Ray Every Day  
6 servings

6 eggs
3 Tbsp. pesto
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

• Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Lay out a baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper.
• Separate the eggs, carefullly keeping the yolks intact.
• Whip the egg whites with an electric beater on medium speed until fluffy and stiff.
• Spoon the fluffy whites into 6 mounds atop the parchment paper. Use the back of the spoon to make an indentation in the middle of each white. Gently place ½ tablespoon pesto inside each indentation. Season the egg whites with salt and pepper.
• Bake 3 minutes, then remove the baking sheet from the oven. Carefully spoon 1 egg yolk into each indentation, then bake 2 to 4 minutes to your desired doneness. Serve immediately.

Photo by Amrita Song 

Amrita Song is the owner and baker at Mila Sweets and blogs at Chai & Dumplings. 

Related Content
Best of Brunch 2017

Recipe: Eggs Kejriwal

Recipe: Crispy Granola

Thursday, September 7th, 2017

090717_baked

 

I confess I have never been a fan of granola, but now I will have to amend that statement to “I have never been a fan of store-bought granola.” This granola is magnificent with yogurt or even just eaten plain as a snack. The cardamom and vanilla add a nice bit of spice, and the whole batch together tastes toasty and not too sweet.

This combo of dried fruit and nuts is my particular favorite. You can change any of the mix-ins according to your preference, and even omit the nuts entirely for a nut-free variation. For a gluten-free option, make sure your oats are gluten-free and omit the wheat germ. This makes enough to share – though you may not want to.

 

Crispy Granola
Adapted from a recipe at Serious Eats
About 9 cups

3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1/3 heaping cup wheat germ
1 heaping Tbsp. chia seeds
1 cup buttermilk
½ cup (1 stick) butter, melted
¾ cup sugar
2 tsp. vanilla bean paste or 1 split and scraped vanilla bean
1 tsp. cardamom
½ tsp. kosher salt
¾ cup pumpkin seeds
½ cup cashews
½ cup sliced almonds
1 tsp. olive oil
½ cup dried blueberries
½ cup dried tart cherries
½ cup golden raisins

• In a large mixing bowl, combine the oats, wheat germ and chia seeds. Stir in the buttermilk and melted butter until evenly coated. Cover with a towel and set aside 20 minutes, until the oats appear dry.
• Stir in the sugar, vanilla, cardamon and salt and toss to coat evenly. Cover with a towel and set aside 30 minutes, until the mixture looks loose and damp.
• Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Spread the pumpkin seeds, cashews and almonds on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake 10 minutes, until fragrant and beginning to brown. Transfer to a large mixing bowl, toss with the oil and stir in the blueberries, dried cherries and raisins. Set aside.
• Reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees.
• Spread the oat-mixture in an even layer across the same baking sheet. Bake 75 to 100 minutes, stirring the granola every 20 to 25 minutes, until the oats are toasted and dry.
• Add the toasted oats to the dried fruit and nuts, stir to combine, then return to the baking sheet and let cool completely. Transfer to airtight containers. The granola can be stored for several weeks at room temperature.

Amrita Song is the owner and baker at Mila Sweets.

Related Content
• Recipe: Eggplant and Tomato Bruschetta

Baked: Eggs Kejriwal

Friday, April 7th, 2017

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The story behind this Indian dish goes that a man named Kejriwal was from a strict vegetarian community – even eggs were off-limits there. When he would visit a sports club in Mumbai, he indulged in a favorite dish: an egg on cheese toast covered with green chile chutney. It was was so tasty, the club added it to the menu, calling it Eggs Kejriwal.

I’ve created my own version of it using a soft burger bun, American cheddar, a perfectly fried egg and homemade serrano chile chutney. The chutney packs a nice kick at the end, but it’s definitely doable for those who can’t tolerate too much heat. You’ll have quite a bit of chutney leftover, but it will last three months if covered in the refrigerator. It’s lovely smeared on a sandwich with some cooling cucumbers or atop a burger or taco.

 

Eggs Kejriwal
1 serving

¼ medium red onion
3 serrano peppers, seeded
3 oz. fresh cilantro
½ oz. fresh mint
1 garlic clove
1 Tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. lemon juice
¾ tsp. kosher salt
2 slices cheddar cheese
1 split burger bun
2 tsp. butter
2 eggs

• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
• In the bowl of a food processor or blender, puree the onion, peppers, cilantro, mint, garlic, sugar, lemon juice and salt to make a chutney. Set aside.
• Put 1 cheese slice atop each bun half. Place on a baking sheet and toast 6 minutes, until the cheese is melted.
• Meanwhile, in a nonstick skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Crack the eggs in the skillet and fry to desired doneness.
• Place the toasted buns on a serving plate. Top each with an egg and liberally cover with the chutney. Serve immediately. The remaining chutney will keep, covered and refrigerated, up to 3 months.

Amrita Song is the owner and baker at Mila Sweets and blogs at Chai & Dumplings

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Baked: Sriracha Crackers

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The Scoop: Half & Half to open second location in Webster Groves

Monday, January 9th, 2017

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{ Clara Cakes at Half & Half }

 

 

Mike and Liz Randolph, co-owners of Randolph Restaurants (Randolfi’s, Público, Half & Half), have announced a second location of Half & Half in Webster Groves. The breakfast and lunch spot will open in late spring or early summer at 220 W. Lockwood Ave., in the current First Watch space.

Liz Randolph said Webster Groves has many similarities to Clayton, which has proven to be a supportive environment for the original location. These include a community that patronizes local business and plenty of nearby residential areas. The city also has a university with a large student population.

“We have wanted to expand for a while, but it needed to feel right. It’s important to us that we continue to be a part of a community. Webster Groves seems like a great fit, and we are really excited to take this next step,” she said. “We’d been talking about it for about a year, and I always figured it would work out when the time was right. You can’t rush it.”

Randolph said the space was especially attractive since it’s already set up as a restaurant. “We’ve turned an old Blockbuster and a former hair salon into restaurants before,” she said, adding that transforming them into restaurants took considerable work. “I’m just excited to have a kitchen this time.”

The new space will have more seats than the Clayton location, she said, but less than First Watch. Space Architecture & Design will oversee the restaurant’s rustic design, which will include a large coffee bar, mason jars, a white wood bar and antique mirrors.

The Webster Groves Half & Half will share hours and menu items with the Clayton location, though Randolph said the chefs at each restaurant will be creating their own brunch specialties.

 

 

Related Content
The Scoop: Olive & Oak owners to open cafe in Webster Groves

• The Scoop: J McArthur’s to close, new concept from Robust owners to open

• Sauce Magazine: January 2017

Best New Restaurants: No. 9 – Egg

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

To be the best, everything matters – atmosphere, service and food. Here, the places that dazzled us from the moment they opened: St. Louis’ 10 Best New Restaurants of 2016.

 

120116_egg

{ cornbread benedict }

Egg, the former weekend brunch pop-up at Spare No Rib, hatched into its own restaurant this October, and we couldn’t be happier.

Certain combinations may sound odd, but don’t let that stop you from ordering chakchouka alongside a cheesy carne asada wrap or a chorizo breakfast taco with the cornbread and gravy.

The eclectic, Tex-Mex-leaning menu is a reflection of chef-owner Lassaad Jeliti’s background, from growing up in Tunisia to running a barbecue/taco joint for the past three years. The chakchouka, a hearty tomato and pepper stew topped with creamy soft-baked eggs and served with toast for dipping, was a childhood breakfast favorite. The Benedicts begin with the sweet, crumbly cornbread Jeliti perfected at Spare No Rib, topped with sauteed veggies or house-smoked pork belly and poached eggs, all drenched in hollandaise.

“They all have similar flavor profiles,” Jeliti said of his influences. “The Mexicans got their flavors from the Spaniards, who got their flavors from [North Africans],” he joked. “That’s my theory, anyway.”

Whatever its heritage, Egg’s flawlessly prepared, wide-ranging fare keeps us coming back for brunch.

 

More about Egg

• First Look: Egg in Benton Park

• The Scoop: Spare No Rib to move to larger space, expand Egg

Photo by Cory Miller

By the Book: How to Boil an Egg by Rose Carrarini

Friday, October 28th, 2016

BTB_Oct16_Round4_1

 

How to Boil an Egg by Rose Carrarini is full of simple, timeless egg-centric recipes from a basic poached egg to quiche and pastries. What attracted me to the book, though, was its restrained British elegance with lush stills of popovers and Eton messes by botanical artist Fiona Strickland.

I want to be the person who can make an excellent scone. The classier-sounding British biscuits have always eluded me in their simplicity, and though this recipe made a clear and even pleasant read, that remains the case. Everything from the weather to the way you fill a cup with flour can affect the amount of liquid needed to bake scone, and it’s hard to adjust ingredients without overworking the dough. However, despite being a bit dry and tough, these cute teatime snacks were delightfully savory and deeply spiced – perfect with a generous pat of butter.

Skill level: Beginner to intermediate – the directions are clear and helpful, but some dishes require a little experience, or at least cooking common sense.
Others to try: Green tarts, popovers
The verdict: Despite the bold and interesting flavor of these scones, their dryness couldn’t beat Butter & Scotch‘s biscuits and gravy.

 

BTB_Oct16_Round4_2

 

Cheddar, Leek & Curry Scones
18 small scones

4½ cups (500 g.) self-rising flour, plus extra for dusting
4 Tbsp. caster (superfine) sugar
2 tsp. curry powder
½ tsp. salt
100 g. (scant ½ cup) butter
60 g. (generous ½ cup) grated cheddar cheese
2 eggs
120 ml. (½ cup) sour cream
Lightly beaten egg, to glaze

For the leeks:
40 g. (3 Tbsp.) butter
1 Tbsp. olive oil
250 g. (9 oz.) leeks, thinly sliced
1 tsp. sugar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and line a baking sheet with baking parchment paper.
• First, prepare the leeks. Melt the butter with the oil in a pan, add the leeks and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, for 10 to 15 minutes, until very soft.
• Stir in the sugar, season with salt and pepper and leave to cool, and then chill in the refrigerator.
• Meanwhile, put the flour, sugar, curry powder, and salt into a bowl, add the butter and rub in with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fresh breadcrumbs.
• Stir in the cheese and make a well in the middle.
• Lightly beat the eggs with 3 tablespoons of the sour cream in a bowl, stir in the leek mixture, and pour into the well.
• Using a fork, stir to mix, finishing by hand to bring the dough together, adding the remaining cream if necessary. Do not overwork the dough – it should just come together softly but firmly.
• Roll or pat out the dough on a lightly floured surface to about 3 centimeters (1¼ inches) thick.
• Carefully stamp out 4 to 5 centimenter (1½- to 2-inch) rounds and put them on the prepared baking sheet.
• Brush with beaten egg to glaze. Bake for about 20 minutes, until golden.

Reprinted with permission from Phaidon

By the Book: Butter & Scotch by Allison Kave and Keavy Landreth

Friday, October 21st, 2016

BTB_Oct16_2_Round3_1

 

 

Though not explicitly a breakfast cookbook, Butter & Scotch knows its way around a brunch menu. The owners of the Brooklyn bar and bakery built their shop around two favorite things: cocktails and baked goods. Their Saturday brunch menu focuses on that most delicious of savory breakfast treats: biscuits.

Biscuits and gravy is a Midwest favorite, and the Brooklynites do the dish credit with this simple, comforting recipe. Two sticks of butter and a generous pour of heavy cream create a rich biscuit with a tender crumb, and apple cider vinegar adds a pleasant tang reminiscent of buttermilk without the extra trip to the grocery store.

You’ll be tempted to pour off the pool of fat that renders as you brown the sausage – don’t. Instead, gleefully add a tablespoon of butter or bacon fat and stir in the flour to make a roux for white gravy as thick as warm peanut butter. Dollop this atop the crumbly biscuits and dive in – then head back to bed and sleep it off.

Skill level: Medium. A home baker can tackle most of these recipes, but the home bartender should prepare to work for those cocktails.
Other recipes to try: Smoked trout Benedict, Magic Buns, Watchamacallthat Pie
The Verdict: Though the apple Dutch baby is a showstopper, this no-nonsense biscuits and gravy recipe stole our Midwestern hearts.

 

102016_btb
Biscuits & Gravy
4 servings

1 lb. (455 g.) loose sweet Italian Sausage
1 Tbsp. bacon fat or butter
¼ cup (30 g.) unbleached all-purpose flour
2 cups (480 ml.) whole milk
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 Brooklyn biscuits

• In a saucepan over medium-high heat, brown the sausage until it’s fully cooked. Add the bacon fat or butter and flour and mix with a wooden spoon or spatula, making sure it doesn’t burn on the bottom. After 30 seconds, add the milk. Stir, scraping up the bits from the bottom of the saucepan, then bring the gravy to a boil and let it simmer until the moisture thickens to the desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
• Split the biscuits in half and lay them open-faced onto plates. Spoon the gravy on top and serve.

Brooklyn Biscuits
8 to 10 biscuits

2½ cups heavy cream
2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
4½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
1 Tbsp. plus 2 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. kosher salt
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
1 cup (2 sticks) cold, unsalted butter, chopped into ½-inch pieces

• Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
• In a small bowl, mix together the cream and vinegar and set aside.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and baking soda and mix on low. Add the butter and mix on medium-low speed until the butter is broken down to small, pea-size pieces. Turn the mixer back to low and slowly add the cream and vinegar mixture. Mix just until the dough comes together. Do not over mix, or the biscuits will be tough.
• Pour the dough onto a floured surface and pat it down until it’s about 2 inches thick. Use a 3-inch cookie or biscuit cutter to cut out 8 rounds. Arrange the rounds on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Pat together the scraps and cut out more rounds if possible; you should be able to get another biscuit or two. Be gentle so the biscuits don’t get tough. Discard any remaining scraps.
• Bake the biscuits for 15 to 20 minutes, or until they are golden brown. Remove them to a wire rack, then serve warm. Store leftovers in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days.

Reprinted with permission from Abrams Publishing

By the Book: America’s Best Breakfasts by Lee Brian Schrager and Adeena Sussman

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

BTB_Oct16_2_Round2_1

 

Authors Lee Brian Schrager and Adeena Sussman tapped into their network of culinary friends and chefs across the U.S. to discover some of the country’s best breakfasts. Each region gets its due (shoutouts to Prasino and Half & Half, who represented St. Louis), and I headed to Miami to make chef Ingrid Hoffmann’s Colombian pan de yuca.

Tapioca flour comes from the starchy roots of the yuca plant (also known as cassava), which is found in South and Central America. This superfine powder is easy to find in the specialty aisle of most grocery stores. The instructions were simple; mix everything together and knead to combine. The rich yuca buns came out soft, golden and very cheesy. Unfortunately upon cooling, they deflated into flat discs and the cheese and tapioca flour created a gelatinous core, the texture of which some people found off-putting. Next time, I’ll add more baking powder so they puff up more.

The accompanying oatmeal “smoothie” was a bit of a misnomer. A smoothie implies that fruit comes to the party, but with just oatmeal, milk, cinnamon and vanilla, this “smoothie” was akin to a oatmeal cookie batter milkshake. After that soupy mess, I doubt I’ll eat oatmeal any time soon.

Skill level: Easy – there’s nothing too crazy here, and the book goes well beyond the traditional bacon and eggs.
Other recipes to try: Kimchi pancakes, tortilla de papas
The verdict: The smoothie dampened the experience, so Big Bad Breakfast takes the win this week.

 

BTB_Oct16_2_Round2_2

 

Yuca Buns
10 buns

1 cup tapioca starch (also known as tapioca flour), plus extra for kneading
1 tsp. baking powder
1¼ tsp. kosher salt
¼ cup heavy cream, plus more as needed
2 cups finely grated Oaxaca cheese or other fresh white cheese, such as mozzarella
2 large egg yolks

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, whisk together the tapioca starch, baking powder and salt. Stir in the cheese, egg yolks and cream. Once the dough forms a ball, turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Using your hands, knead the dough until smooth and not sticky. Add extra cream a tablespoon at a time if necessary to make the dough supple.
• Divide the dough into 10 equal pieces and shape them into balls. Arrange them 1 inch apart on the prepared baking sheet and bake until pale golden, tender, and soft, 18 to 20 minutes. Serve hot.

Old-Fashioned Oatmeal (Avena) Breakfast Smoothies
4 servings

6 cups milk, plus more if needed
1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
2 Tbsp. sugar, or more to taste
Pinch of cinnamon, or more to taste
1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)

• In a medium saucepan, bring the milk and oats to a rapid simmer over medium-high heat, stirring to prevent the oatmeal from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring constantly, until the oatmeal is thick, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the sugar and cinnamon to taste, and cool slightly, 10 to 15 minutes.
• Refrigerate the oatmeal in a sealed container for at least 2 hours or overnight. Transfer the oatmeal to a blender, add the vanilla (if using), and puree until smooth, adding more milk for a thinner shake or ice cubes to chill further. Serve cold.

Reprinted with permission from Clarkson Potter Publishers

First Look: Egg in Benton Park

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

Egg_05

 

Pay no attention to the Spare No Rib signs at 2200 Gravois Ave.; Egg is now open for weekday breakfast and lunch in the barbecue joint’s original location. As reported by The Scoop in July, Egg is an expansion of the brunch popup by the same name. Spare No Rib has opened with the same menu in its new location at 3701 S. Jefferson Ave. (formerly the home of Lucky Buddha). Owner Lassaad Jeliti quietly transitioned the two concepts in recent weeks.

Few changes were made to the interior of the 60-seat Benton Park restaurant, but the menu has expanded from its popup days and lost most of its barbecue flair. It got rid of the pulled pork, added brioche French toast and took on a unique lunch menu that strays far from its barbecue roots with dishes inspired by Jeliti’s Tunisian heritage.

Aside from the Tunisian salad made with tomato, onion, cucumber, jalapenos and apples in a lemon vinaigrette, there is a salad nicoise on the lunch menu. “Nicoise is a big salad in Tunisia,” Jeliti said. There is also chakchouka, a stewed tomato and vegetable dish served with baked eggs. “Growing up that was the breakfast thing,” he said.

The bar dominating the space serves a short menu of brunch cocktails along with espresso drinks and freshly squeezed orange and grapefruit juices. A classic mimosa and bloody mary are available, as well as more creative sippers like the Sidi Bou Spritz made with hop vodka, jasmine and elderflower liqueurs and fresh orange juice.

Egg is open Tuesday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Click below for a first look at what’s for breakfast on Gravois:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

-photos by Michelle Volansky

 

By the Book: Big Bad Breakfast by John Currence

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

BTB_Oct16_2_Round1_1

 

Big Bad Breakfast sounded like a fun cookbook, and author John Currence has the credentials to back up his recipes. He won a James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef: South in 2009, and he is the chef-owner of several restaurants in Oxford, Mississippi, including (of course) Big Bad Breakfast.

I chose to make his German pancake. Like its Dutch baby cousin, it’s baked rather than cooked on the stovetop, producing a gloriously puffy breakfast treat that elicits oohs and ahs when it hits the table. Currence’s version fills a simple batter with apples and butter, then pours into an oven-proof skillet atop even more butter, apples and dark brown sugar, creating a sticky caramelized base.

The pancake puffed up as promised, but it took much longer than the recommended 12 to 14 minutes. After nearly 20 minutes, the top still had not browned as I’d hoped, so I helped it along with the broiler. Though it wasn’t quite the voluminous showstopper I’d hoped for, it tasted wonderful when finished with a squeeze of fresh lemon and a splash of maple syrup. I’d definitely make this again.

Skill level: Moderate. There are some recipes in here that require more time and more obscure ingredients.
Other recipes to try: Sauteed trout, soft scrambled eggs, chanterelle mushrooms, Louisiana crabcake Benedict
The verdict: Check back next week when Big Bad Breakfast takes on the next breakfast challenger.

 

BTB_Oct16_2_Round1_2

 

German Pancake
1 to 2 servings

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1 tsp. salt
½ cup whole milk
¼ cup buttermilk
6 eggs
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
¼ cup unsalted butter, melted
1 Granny Smith apple, cored, peeled and sliced into thin wedges
¼ cup clarified butter or your preferred cooking fat
1/3 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
Confectioners’ sugar and freshly squeezed lemon juice, for sprinkling

• Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
• In a bowl, stir together the flour, granulated sugar and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk, buttermilk, eggs and vanilla. Pour the milk mixture into the flour mixture and whisk together until smooth. Whisk in the melted butter, then stir in half of the apple.
• Warm an 8-inch cast-iron skillet (or nonstick skillet) over medium heat for 1 minute. Add the clarified butter, then place the remaining apple slices around the bottom of the skillet and sprinkle with the brown sugar. Pour the batter evenly over the top and slide the skillet into the oven. Bake until the top of the pancake is golden brown, puffy and firm to the touch, 12 to 14 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice, and serve immediately, preferably directly from the pan.

Reprinted with permission from 10 Speed Press

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