Hello Stranger | Login | Create Account
 
 
 
 
 
  SAUCE MAGAZINE
|
Oct 19, 2017
|
Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
|
SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
Email | Text-size: A | A | A

Posts Tagged ‘Catherine Klene’

First Look: BLK MKT Eats in Midtown

Friday, October 13th, 2017

BlkMkt_07

 

St. Louis has danced with the dual sushi bowl and poke trends for years, but cousins Kati Fahrney and Ron Turigliatto have brought the first fast-casual sushi bowl and roll restaurant to St. Louis with BLK MKT Eats.

The restaurant, located at 9 S. Vandeventer Ave., across from Saint Louis University, opens for lunch Wednesday, Oct. 18.

As The Scoop reported in July, Turigliatto and Fahrney are first-time restaurant owner who turned their passion for home cooking and travel into a business. The former teachers traveled across the country exploring similar concepts and fine-tuning their menu.

The 1,000-square-foot space will operate primarily as a carryout operation with curbside pickup and delivery to come in the near future. Ravenous diners who can’t wait to get home can snack on the spot at a standing bar or one of four stools at the window.

The menu features a handful of items that can be served as a burrito-sized sushi rolls wrapped in thin sheets of nori or as bowls with greens, brown or white rice. Three items are also available as nachos served atop house-made wonton chips.

The cousins source their raw salmon and tuna from Seattle Fish five to six times a week and use it in a variety of items like the OG Fire, which includes the customer’s choice of salmon or tuna. The Swedish Fish showcases Fahrney’s cured salmon, a recipe she’s perfected over years of family Christmas Eve dinners.

Those squeamish about raw fish can try the Tasty As Cluck featuring buttermilk-fried chicken or the Seoul Delicious with grilled chicken. Vegans and vegetarians are not forgotten, either; the Holy Shiitake swaps meat and seafood for braised mushrooms.

BLK MKT Eats will be open Monday to Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Thursday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from Midtown’s newest fast-casual spot:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Editor’s Note: This article originally stated BLK MKT Eats received fish deliveries three to five times a week. It was updated at 4:45 p.m. with the correct information. 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• BLK MKT Eats will open next month in Midtown

• Build-your-own poke bowl spot Poke Doke will open in the CWE

• Poke: The Hawaiian classic that’s having a big moment

 

First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

Earthbound_02

 

At long last, Earthbound Beer’s new home is ready to welcome customers. The brewery and tasting room at 2724 Cherokee St., opens Saturday, Sept. 23.

The massive 2,500-square foot tasting room has been a project two years in the making. As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners and brewers Stuart Keating, Rebecca Schranz and Jeff Siddons announced they were moving from their flagship location down the street at 2710 Cherokee St. The space was less than 1,000 square feet and only allowed the brewers to make one beer at a time.

Eight old Earthbounds could fit into the new space that once housed part of Cherokee Street Brewing in the late 1800s. The tasting room seats around 80 on the first level and mezzanine, a feature designed by architecture and general contractor Nathan Dirnberger. The mezzanine appears to float above the tasting room thanks to railings made of tension wire and heavy-duty chains suspended from the 17-foot barrel ceilings.

Read more: Go underground at Earthbound Beer during construction

Behind the bar, 16 taps will pour Earthbound brews and a few guest taps, with another two nitro taps available. A small selection of spirits will be available (still no mixers or ice, the owners noted) with the potential for batch cocktails in the future. Earthbound patrons can now enjoy wine, too, with two reds, two whites and a rosé available by the glass.

Below the tasting room, a 7-barrel system will increase Earthbound’s production tenfold. The space also houses a canning line that will crank out 16-ounce four-packs of staple brews. Caves underneath neighbor 2720 Cherokee St. will allow for a barrel-aging program in the future.

As The Scoop reported in August, Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will helm the food program at Earthbound. The menu will feature smoked meats, sausages and sandwiches, though food won’t be available until November at the earliest.

Earthbound’s new location means new hours, too. It will be open Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from noon to midnight and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Here’s a first look at Earthbound Beer’s new home.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Vista Ramen will helm kitchen at new Earthbound location

Extra Sauce: Underground at Earthbound

Earthbound Beer to expand to new brewery on Cherokee

First Look: Grace Meat & Three in The Grove

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

090617_grace5

 

Chef Rick Lewis is bringing his southern food to The Grove. Grace Meat & Three will open Wed., Sept. 13 at 4270 Manchester Ave., in the former home of Sweetie Pie’s at The Mangrove.

As The Scoop reported in June, Lewis left his role as executive chef of Southern to open his own project with wife Elisa Lewis. Grace will offer a traditional “meat and three” menu featuring mains and rotating seasonal sides like greens, biscuits and mac and cheese.

“It’s all the things we’ve learned over the years coming to fruition here,” Rick said.

Elisa designed the 4,000-square-foot space with finds from rummage sales and items they’d collected over the years like old mattress springs that were turned into living wall decor with succulents and Spanish moss. The space will seat 100, and features a community table and bar stools designed by Goebel & Co.

 

 

Place your order at the counter, then grab a seat and wait for runners to drop off cafeteria trays laden with comfort food. Pick from mains like sweet tea-brined turkey legs, catfish bites or fried chicken, then pick two or three sides. Sandwiches including Rick Lewis’ famous house-made fried bologna and a burger are available, as well as a handful of salads and sharable starters.

Nonalcoholic beverages are self-serve, but customers can pick up canned and bottled beer, a few local draft options and a small selection of cocktails like ice picks, mint juleps and bloody marys at the bar.

Grace will start with lunch service Wednesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., with dinner service soon to follow. Here’s a first look at the newest project from Rick and Elisa Lewis.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Meera Nagarajan and Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Rick Lewis dubs new restaurant Grace Meat & Three

Rick Lewis to open new restaurant in The Grove

Rick Lewis to leave Quincy Street Bistro, open chicken shack with Pappy’s Mike Emerson

What I Do: Alisha Blackwell-Calvert of Reeds American Table

Friday, September 1st, 2017

083117_whatido

 

Certified sommelier Alisha Blackwell-Calvert has a knack for navigation. She spends most of her time curating and guiding customers through Reeds American Table’s award-winning wine list, but on Saturdays, she squires tourists about town in a carriage drawn by a horse named Moose. Blackwell-Calvert recently left a promising career in beverage distribution to reenter the restaurant industry as Reeds’ beverage director, and she hasn’t looked back. Here, she shares how she spends her downtime, her thoughts on wine in a can and what she wants to be when she grows up.

“I am a science geek. I love geology; I love geography; I love culture. I had no idea that … in wine, you put all these things together. … The geography of the place and what the people are like and what they eat, and this is the wine that they make and because the sun hits this hill at a certain angle, the grapes taste this way. My mind was blown.”

“I took the entry-level sommelier exam through the Court of Master Sommeliers in Kansas City. I studied for months and months … and did very well. I felt very comfortable taking that test. After the test was over, and I got my little ‘You made it’ diploma, master sommelier Doug Frost leans over and says, ‘You should stick with this.’ … That was a big deal. It made my heart feel good.”

“It took me two weeks to think about [moving to Reeds]. I was very happy with Vintegrity and the hours and the flexibility. But I thought about my career and what I want to do when I grow up, if you will, and Alisha Blackwell-Calvert wants to be a master sommelier. It’s not something you can sign up for and it happens, but it’s what I want to work toward … and in order to do that, you need restaurant experience.”

“It’s not all glitz and glamour and slinging Dom. There’s a lot of hard work that goes into it. I’m constantly tasting. It’s a mountain of paperwork and spreadsheets. The fun part is hanging out on the floor trying to sell you a bottle, but there are hours and hours of work that go into making that moment happen for the guest.”

“Horses are my peaceful time, especially when I’m with my sweetheart, Moose. He’s so calm, and he’s so pretty, and he’s so friendly. We have a bond and a relationship that’s like no other. You can’t nuzzle up to a bottle of wine – or you could. I guess you could. It depends on what the wine is.”

“One thing I want to knock and can’t is wine from a can. I can’t knock it, I’ve had some good ones. They’re not all good, but the good ones are great. Friction makes really good wines in a can. … It’s like blueberry pie. I was like, ‘This is stupid – this is the worst idea ever,’ and then, ‘Aw crap, it’s good. Damn it.’”

“The typical-looking sommelier back in the day used to be the old white guy at the restaurant. Now it’s the young white guy at the restaurant, and I am neither of those things. Especially when you get to the master sommelier level, there are not a lot of people who look like me. … I don’t fit some people’s thought of how I should be. I don’t fit that stereotype or that mold. I don’t seek it out – I’m just me.”

Photo by Ashley Gieseking

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Best New Restaurants: No. 5 – Reeds American Table

Best of Brunch 2017: Reeds American Table

Super Somms: St. Louis’ top wine students prepare to hold court

First Look: The Cut on Cherokee Street

Friday, September 1st, 2017

090117_thecut5

 

Ari Jo Ellis is sharpening her knives for the first service at The Cut, her new restaurant inside The Fortune Teller Bar at 2635 Cherokee St. Doors open tonight, Sept. 1, at 5 p.m.

As The Scoop reported in August, The Fortune Teller Bar’s owners approached Ellis (Sauce Ones to Watch class of 2016) with the opportunity to run a restaurant out of their kitchen a few months after The Little Dipper closed. Ellis has long had an interest in whole-animal butchery, working at Bolyard’s Meat & Provisions, Quincy Street Bistro, Southern and, most recently, Kitchen Kulture.

The Cut’s menu consists of five regular sausages and one special, along with a handful of side options. Customers can try classic bratwursts with beer mustard and sauerkraut or more creative options like the Cherokee-rizo, a nod to the neighborhood’s Mexican heritage. Plant-based eaters won’t be left out, either, with a tofu-based sausage using local Mofu tofu, navy beans, nutritional yeast and spices. All sausages are served on buns from Vitale’s Bakery.

Side options include backyard grilling classics like baked beans and cole slaw, as well as Rap Snacks chips and a “wild card” side that will change depending on that week’s produce delivery.

Ellis will break down about two whole hogs a week (sourced from Such and Such Farms) to create her sausages and some condiments and specials. Ellis said she also hopes to sell some cuts and links for customers to prepare at home.

The Cut will be open Wednesday to Saturday from 5 p.m. to midnight and Sunday from 4 to 11 p.m. Here’s a first look at what to expect from The Cut inside Fortune Teller Bar tonight:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Ari Jo Ellis to open The Cut inside The Fortune Teller Bar

Ones to Watch 2016: Ari Ellis

• Best New Restaurants 2016: No. 3 – Southern

Trendwatch: Guide to Drinking 2017 Edition

Friday, September 1st, 2017

083117_trendwatch2

1. Shake It Off
Love ’em or hate ’em, milkshake IPAs made a splash this summer. These creamy, dreamsicle-like IPAs are brewed with fruit and lactose sugars commonly used in milk stouts that gives their signature thick, rich mouth feel. Pennsylvania’s Tired Hands and Sweden’s Omnipollo Brewing kicked off the trend in 2015 with the titular Milkshake IPA (with several variations to follow), and St. Louis brewers are also experimenting with the style. Jeff Hardesty at Narrow Gauge Brewing Co. released To the Yard (Peach), a rich, hazy IPA brewed with lactose sugar and aged on vanilla beans and peaches. Forthcoming Rockwell Beer Co. tried out the technique with a few versions of Meringue, a beer brewed with lactose, lemon and vanilla, including Coconut Meringue, Raspberry Meringue and Orange Meringue. A handful of milkshake IPAs were spotted at 2nd Shift Brewing’s annual Criderfest, including Nashville’s Southern Grist with its Guava Upside Down Cake (a double IPA brewed with guava, vanilla beans and lactose) and Windmill Brewing out of Indiana, which brought its Memes & Dreams, a lactose-fermented IPA with mangoes and vanilla.

2. To-Drink List
The wine list has always had top billing at fine dining eateries, but many area restaurants are giving craft brews a place in the spotlight. Places like Vicia, Olive & Oak and Sardella boast a healthy mix of local, regional and international options. Retreat Gastropub describes its beer list like its wines, categorizing brews with helpful key characteristics. The Libertine pays homage to beer’s heritage with large-format German bottles, and Cleveland-Heath appeases both the workaday drinker and the craft fan with a list including Stag and offerings only available in Illinois like Surly Brewing Co. Some fine dining establishments even partner with local breweries to create custom beers for the restaurant like Side Project Cup of Love previously at Sardella; look for Perennial Ollie Ollie Oxen Free at Olive & Oak, Perennial Brew for the Crew at Farmhaus and Perennial Single Barrel Stout at Juniper.

3. Hot New Pinots
German pinot noir, or Spätburgunder, is all the rage right now. In fact, it can prove difficult to find a bottle despite being the third-largest producer of pinot noir in the world. Why? Let’s just say German pinot noirs of the past didn’t taste good – thin and on the acidic side – because the weather was just not right for this grape. But due to recent rising temperatures and longer, sunnier days (thanks, global warming), the fruit now ripens better, making the resulting wine resemble an expensive Burgundy at an affordable price. Think light-bodied, refined reds with notes of red fruit that are delicate with a very dry, long finish. Find it on the shelf at Parker’s Table (a Koehler-Ruprecht 2013 Spätburgunder for $20), at the Wine Merchant (a 1 liter Heger 2014 Pinot Noir for $20) or order it off the wine list at Eleven Eleven Mississippi or 33 Wine Shop & Bar.

 

Narwhals_05

{ Narwahl’s Crafted Urban Ice drinks } 

 

4. Brain Freeze
Frozen and blended drinks have experienced a resurgence of late, becoming a “thing” again at such highly regarded establishments as Diamond Reef in Brooklyn and Preux & Proper in Los Angeles. St. Louis has been getting in on the frosty action as well. Narwahl’s Crafted Urban Ice in Midtown has a dedicated menu of frozen delights that includes such concoctions as the Watermelon Frosé and the Rhubarb Paloma. The Preston has brought out the blender to create drinks like the absinthe watermelon colada, and Porano has had great success with its über-popular Negroni Slushie.

5. Powder Powered
Instead of using traditional hop pellets, some brewers are sprinkling their beer with a little magic dust. 4 Hands Brewing Co. brewery manager Martin Toft used hop powder – aka cryogenically processed hops – in Loose Particles, a juicy Northeast-style IPA with Simcoe and Mosaic. Toft said he can use significantly less product and get more aroma and flavor from the hops, and he’s already planning to hit more recipes with the powder next year. 2nd Shift Brewing also experimented with Cryo Hops in its Equanot Experimental IPA, a light, clean brew with equanot hops.

6. Can It
Canned wine sales are booming like never before as consumers shrug off the lowbrow stigma of popping a top to quaff their vino. In fact, Nielsen Company reported sales rose 125 percent from summer 2015 to summer 2016. The perks of canned wine are numerous. They’re eminently portable, perfect for the pool or float trips where glass is off-limits. No additional glassware – or a corkscrew – is required, and cans can be easier to recycle than bottles. Plus, more and more high-quality producers are now ensconcing their juice in aluminum, like Alloy Wine Works, which cans several of its wines, including Everyday Rose, (a Sauce office favorite), and Union Wine Co.’s Underwood line, which offers five canned varieties.

 

Catherine Klene, Matt Sorrell and Meera Nagarajan contributed to this article. 

First Look: Half & Half in Webster Groves

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

HalfAndHalf_04

 

Webster Groves residents will set their alarm clocks a little earlier when Half & Half opens at 220 W. Lockwood Ave. Co-owners Mike and Liz Randolph hope to open the second location of their popular Clayton breakfast and lunch spot by the end of August, pending final inspections.

As The Scoop reported in January, the Randolphs (who also own Randolfi’s and Público in The Loop) signed a lease on the space that once housed First Watch Cafe. The four-month renovation process, helmed by SPACE Architecture & Design, has yielded an 85-seat eatery with a light, airy feel. Randolph said he wanted to evoke the feeling of a New England-style breakfast spot with bright white walls and benches, a large space for waiting near the host stand and big picture windows along the front.

Half & Half executive chef Dale Beauchamp will move to the Webster Groves space, executing the same menu as the sister location – though each restaurant will feature its own weekend brunch specials. Those just looking for a caffeine buzz can pop their heads through a to-go window in the breezeway and place a quick coffee order with the barista behind the bar. This Half & Half will also carry Blueprint Coffee and offer a full menu of traditional drip and espresso options, as well as pour-overs.

Half & Half will be open 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday to Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Here’s what to expect when doors open at the Randolphs’ newest restaurant.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 Space photos by Michelle Volansky; pancake and coffee photos by Carmen Troesser

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Best of Brunch 2017

Half & Half to open second location in Webster Groves

Meals That Changed My Life: Mike Randolph

What I Do: Colleen Clawson at Milque Toast Bar

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

080117_whatido

 

Chef Colleen Clawson can do wonders with a piece of toast. Like an artist with a blank canvas, she piles vibrant ingredients into colorful, edible works of art that are devoured in short order at Milque Toast Bar. Clawson spent years in fine dining kitchens (Five Bistro, Remy’s Kitchen & Wine Bar, Sidney Street Cafe, to name a few), but she and Amanda Geimer struck out on their own two years ago with a tiny breakfast and lunch spot across the alley from Clawson’s McKinley Heights home. Here, she shares her inspirations, how she blows off steam and a brief message to avocado toast haters.

 

“Sometimes I could make things simpler, but where’s the fun in that? You have this toast and it’s this thing with 18 different elements all of a sudden, but it looks really good like that and it tastes awesome, so I’m just leaving it. I guess I’d rather people wait two extra minutes.”

“[Avocado toast] is delicious. Like, what is your problem? Why do you hate life so much? Aren’t there much more important things to be angry about? I could give you a big long list of things that are legitimately wrong that you could get mad for.”

“I have a couple of reference books that I still always go back to because they’re just so good. ‘The Flavor Bible’ … I like ‘The Herbfarm Cookbook,’ which I think is out of print now, but it’s one of my all-time favorites that I always go back to. And the ‘Chez Panisse Cookbook.’ I have some of [Alice Waters’] other ones, too, which I really like, but that’s the one I always find myself looking at again and again. I guess for the same reason you use Google. There’s an aesthetic and a style that I really enjoy, and I feel more akin to that way of making things.”

“I wish people understood they’re paying for a lot of things that aren’t just on your plate. There is a way that I could make this place even cheaper, but I’m not going to because I would have to sacrifice what’s more important.”

“It’s a great time to be in food in St. Louis. You could start with William Thomas Pauley over at Confluence Kombucha. I just saw him. Their particular place is completely unique. … Sometimes when you’ve worked in restaurants for a really long time, you look at things and you know what happened. Sometimes I look at his food and I’m like, ‘What happened? How did he do that?’ In a great way. It’s still mysterious to me.”

“I love dancing. We just went to a reggae show at 2720. Those guys are doing some really neat things down there. The whole arcade and Blank Space and Rumpshaker parties – those are really fun. I haven’t been to one of those in a while because it gets kind of late, and I’m way more boring than I used to be, but I feel better at 6 a.m.”

“There’s this frame shop in Soulard that I worked at where I discovered I really adored this craft. There’s definitely a craft to it. We built everything. There’s matting in framing, so there’s a lot of design and a lot of precision with it, and it feels good to me the same way making a really beautiful plate where everything is supposed to be. There’s a visual, immediate gratification.”

“[My son’s] rebellion is wanting fast food. On his birthday, … he wanted to go to Subway. I was like, ‘You’re kidding me – of all the places?’ But whatever, it’s what he wanted. So we played putt-putt golf and went to Subway. And he was really happy.”

Photo by Carmen Troesser

3 new places to try in August

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

From two new breweries to a seafood boil hotspot, don’t miss these three new places you must try this August.

 

080117_hitlist2

 

1. The Mad Crab 8080 Olive Blvd., University City, 314.801.8698, Facebook: The Mad Crab

The Mad Crab brings a classic Gulf meal to the Midwest with built-to-order seafood boils. Settle in at a paper-lined table, then consult with your dining partners and strategize the best combination of market-priced seafood available. Will you try meaty mussels with fresh crawfish or go all out with whole lobster and snow crab legs? Don’t forget to throw in the requisite potatoes and corn on the cob, then turn your attention to the sauces or combine all three in The Whole Sha-Bang for a buttery, garlicky, spicy punch. Don your plastic bibs and grab your crab crackers (or use your bare hands) to devour the shellfish feast with messy abandon. Our only advice: Don’t wear white.

 

080117_hitlist1

 

2. Center Ice Brewery 3126 Olive St., St. Louis, centericebrewery.com

You don’t have to love hockey to enjoy Center Ice Brewery. Themed touches – like the low rink wall surrounding the brewing equipment and a penalty box, main bar, tables and tap handles all made in part with material reclaimed from the old St. Louis Arena – lend personality without descending into kitsch. Pull up a stool and order a Hop Shelf IPA from the brewery’s house menu (supplemented by locals like Main & Mill and Charleville Brewing Co.), or opt for the light, summery Off Season Saison to beat the heat. You’ve got a new spot to watch the Blues, but there’s no need to wait for the season opener.

 

080117_hitlist3

 

3. Third Wheel Brewing 4008 N. Service Road, St. Peters, 636.323.9810, thirdwheelbrewing.com

It’s good to be a third wheel in St. Peters. Snag a seat at the massive horseshoe-shaped bar and watch brewer and co-owner Abbey Spencer at work through picture windows overlooking the city’s first brewery. Order one of the house brews like the Dyslexic API, an Imperial IPA dry-hopped with Columbus and Simcoe, or the lighter Ophelia’s Wit, a traditional witbier with coriander, orange peel and rosemary. For a German summer experience, sip Going Once… Going Twice… – a flight of four 4-ounce pours of Third Wheel’s Berliner Weiss mixed with a rotating selection of traditional syrups like mint, mulberry or woodruff.

 Photos by Michelle Volansky

First Look: Nudo House in Creve Coeur

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

Nudo_10

 

After years of anticipation, Nudo House is ready to make its debut. The ramen and pho shop from co-owners Qui Tran and Marie-Anne Velasco is slated to open this weekend on Friday, July 28 or Saturday, July 29.

Tran, whose family also owns Mai Lee in Brentwood, first dropped hints about Nudo in 2014, and the restaurant location was officially announced at 11423 Olive Blvd., in Creve Coeur at the end of 2015. Since then, Tran and Velasco have hosted pop-ups to test recipes and drum up anticipation while they did extensive renovations.

 

Upon entering the 2,300-square-foot space, customers step up to the counter and place their order, then grab a seat and watch as their meals are prepared in the open kitchen. The menu includes spring rolls, a few salads and banh mi, but the staples are the pho and ramen bowls.

The four 3-1-Pho options include beef, chicken, shrimp or a combination of all three. Four ramens are also available: a traditional pork tonkotsu, a spicy miso pork, a chicken option and a mushroom-based vegetarian bowl.

Meals can end with a sweet treat, too. Tran and Velasco installed a soft-serve machine where they will offer rotating flavors like coconut and pandan leaf, passion fruit, lychee or mango.

Nudo will be open Monday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from this highly anticipated noodle house:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
The Scoop: Qui Tran to open ramen shop Nudo in Creve Coeur

What I Do: Marie-Anne Velasco of Nudo House

The Scoop: Mai Lee’s Qui Tran moves closer to opening a ramen shop

What I Do: Qui Tran of Mai Lee

RSS FEEDS
Keep up with one or all of your favorite Sauce Magazine columns
Conceived and created by Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC 1999-2017, Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Sauce Magazine 1820 Chouteau Ave. St. Louis, Missouri 63103.
PH: 314-772-8004 FAX: 314-241-8004