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Sep 21, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘chef change’

Chef Carl Hazel takes over Gamlin Whiskey House kitchen

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

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Carl Hazel has quietly taken the reigns as executive chef of Gamlin Whiskey House. Most recently, he had been executive chef at West End Pub and Grill.

Hazel assumed the role in July, and since then, he has worked with Gamlin Restaurant Group’s corporate chef Ryan Cooper to get a feel for the kitchen and the organization.

Hazel said Gamlin Whiskey House’s focus meshes up well with his background, especially his lengthy tenure as executive chef at The Scottish Arms.

“Gamlin Whiskey House being big on meat and whiskey is right up my alley,” Hazel said. “And after talking with some industry friends that have worked for (owners) Derek and Lucas (Gamlin) in the past, I couldn’t find anyone who said anything negative about them at all.”

Hazel said he doesn’t foresee any big menu changes at Gamlin Whiskey House until after the company’s latest project, 1764 Public House, opens later this year at 39 N. Euclid Ave.

“We’ll do some tweaking when (1764 Public House) opens because a couple of the items here will probably fit the menu and environment down there,” he said. “We’ll be looking at more of a broad menu change in late fall or early winter.”

Hazel said he welcomes the challenges of working in a bigger, high-volume kitchen.

“The numbers we put up are astounding,” he said. “It’s quite an undertaking to keep up with everything and everyone, but I’m really enjoying it.”

Photo courtesy of Gamlin Whiskey House

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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Cleveland-Heath owners sell restaurant, will relocate to Utah

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

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Big changes are afoot at Cleveland-Heath. Owners Jenny Cleveland and chef Ed Heath have sold the restaurant to Keith and Kari McGinness, restaurant industry veterans who have roots in the area, as reported by St. Louis Magazine. The sale takes effect Friday, Sept. 1.

Cleveland said she and Heath will relocate to Salt Lake City, where Heath is from.

“We’ve been here for seven years with my family, so it’s time to go out there and do the same for him,” said Cleveland.

Cleveland said she and Heath will work with The Pub Corp., where they both have history – the two actually met while working at one of the company’s restaurants.

“They’ve got four restaurants in the Salt Lake area,” she said. “We’ve been consulting with them for some time; Ed spent quite a bit of time out there last year. Early on, we’re just going to be getting to know the restaurants and working on some new projects eventually.”

Read More: New owner discusses future of Cleveland-Heath

While the transition will be bittersweet, Cleveland said she and Heath would remain connected to the area; she still has family and property in the Metroeast.

“The last thing we want is for people to think we’re just leaving,” she said. “I don’t want to say goodbye. This is our baby, and it’s grown into something that we could never have imagined.”

Heath will remain for the next month or so helping with the kitchen, and Cleveland will make frequent trips back to help with the transition. “If they call me in January and say they need help with something, I’ll be there,” she said.

The Edwardsville eatery has received much acclaim since opening in November 2011. Heath earned national nods as James Beard Foundation semifinalist for Best Chef: Great Lakes in 2015 and 2016, and Sauce readers have frequently voted Cleveland-Heath among their favorite restaurants in the Readers’ Choice poll.

Cleveland said the intent is to keep up those high standards and make the transition as seamless as possible.

“I want people to understand, the faces here are still the same,” she said. “Rick (Kazmer), our chef de cuisine, is getting bumped to executive chef. He’s been in the kitchen with Ed for years. And Eli (Barnes) will still be general manager.”

Photo by Jonathan Gayman 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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New owner discusses the future of Cleveland-Heath

Readers’ Choice 2015: Favorite Restaurant – Cleveland-Heath

Readers’ Choice 2014: Favorite Chef – Ed Heath

 

Eat This: Okonomiyaki at Cleveland-Heath

 

The Scoop: Cafe Osage taps Scott Davis for head chef

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

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{ Brie LT at Cafe Osage }

Scott Davis, who most recently helmed the kitchen at Rise Coffee House, has been tapped to take over as head chef at Cafe Osage.

Cafe Osage general manager Lizzy Rickard said Davis would step into the role next week. The position has been vacant since spring 2016 when chef David Kirkland left to start his own ventures, David Kirkland Catering and Turn.

“At that time, the team we had rose up to take over various positions,” Rickard said. “We’ve been very busy, and we decided it was time to bring in a chef again to best utilize our garden, bring some fresh creativity to the menu and help elevate the dining experience and the dishes.”

Rickard said the time is perfect for the change, since summer produce is starting to come from the garden, which will give Davis plenty to work with.

“We’ve let him know he has the freedom to really make it his own, and we’re open to new ideas and fresh starts,” Rickard said.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Chef Josh Charles departs Blood & Sand

Friday, May 12th, 2017

 

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{ Chef Josh Charles } 

 

After three months helming the kitchen, chef Josh Charles has left Blood & Sand. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, Charles decided to redirect his career to focus on his growing family.

Before Blood & Sand, Charles was executive chef at Element. “When I took the job, my wife was pregnant, and we thought ‘We can make this work, it’ll be fine.’ But the second the baby came, we realized it wasn’t going to work. Those first five weeks, I was not there at all because I was at the restaurant.”

In an effort to spend more time at home, Charles has taken a position as a prep cook at Boundary, which he said gives him more normal, daytime hours and a reduced stress level. He said he’d eventually like to get back to his pastry chef roots and delve into making some of the breads and pastries for the restaurant.

Charles said he’s still consulting with Blood & Sand while the search is on for his replacement, and he’ll also continue to create recipes, videos and blog posts for his website. He also plans to do some pop-up events.

“Hopefully now that I have a bit more time I can do a pop-up every other month or so, so I can still work that creative side of me, and work with friends and farmers,” he said.

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

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The Scoop: Josh Charles leaves Element, heads to Blood & Sand

• The Scoop: New owner discusses vision for Blood & Sand

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The Scoop: Josh Charles leaves Element, heads to Blood & Sand

Monday, February 6th, 2017

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Chef Josh Charles has left his post as executive chef at Element to helm the kitchen at Blood & Sand, as reported by St. Louis Magazine. Charles’ former chef de cuisine Tudor Seserman has stepped up to assume the executive chef role. Charles said the passing of the torch was smooth thanks to their close working relationship.

In his new role, Charles said he’ll work with Blood & Sand’s current chef Chris Krzysik through Valentine’s Day, and then will begin making his mark on the menu.

“The day after, it starts,” he said, adding it should take a month of switching out a couple of dishes at a time before the transition is complete. Charles said diners can expect a bill of fare that reflects his focus on quality ingredients and techniques. While he’ll put his stamp on the food at Blood & Sand, the restaurant’s much-loved tater tots will remain.

“It’s a great platform and a beautiful place,” said Charles. “They’ve always had a reputation for putting out great food and drink. I’m super excited.”

Krzysik said he is currently in talks to take a position at another restaurant, but couldn’t share more information at this time. Element co-owner Carol Hastie did not return requests for comment.

Photo courtesy of Christina Lane 

Related Content
The Scoop: New owner discusses vision for Blood & Sand

• The Scoop: Josh Charles is named executive chef at Element

• Ones to Watch 2014: Josh Charles and John Fauz

 

 

The Scoop: Summer Wright to helm Vicia’s pastry program, Reeds American Table names new pastry chef

Friday, December 23rd, 2016

 

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{ Summer Wright’s panna cotta at Reeds American Table }

 

Summer Wright has been named executive pastry chef at new restaurant Vicia, set to open in late January 2017. Wright currently holds that position at Reeds American Table, where she will be replaced by pastry assistant Ashley Rouch.

Wright said she took the new position in part because of the opportunity it will provide to work with Vicia co-owners Michael and Tara Gallina, who previously worked at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, a highly regarded restaurant in New York’s Hudson River Valley.

“Supporting local farmers is at the core of their cooking philosophy,” Wright said in an email. “It’s really fulfilling to work with Michael and Tara, who put so much emphasis on using the local farmers’ products.”

Wright, who has 16 years of experience in the kitchen, previously worked at Niche, Five Bistro and Claverach Farm. At Vicia, she’ll be responsible for creating sweet and savory pastries for the midday and evening menus. During the day, diners can expect croissants, quiche, scones, cookies and fruit tarts. “Having the opportunity to do a daily daytime service that includes a bakery menu is a major point of interest,” Wright said.

The pastry program will make use of whole grains milled in-house. That’s a big priority for Tara Gallina, who hopes to show people that there is much more out there than all-purpose flour.

“We are really excited to put an emphasis on how versatile and delicious freshly milled flour can be in baked goods,” she said. “Our hope is to spark a conversation with people that there is just as much seasonality and variety in grains as there is with other produce that we now think more about.”

At Reeds American Table, Rouch will have the opportunity to experiment with the pastry program, chef-owner Matt Daughaday said, but he doesn’t predict drastic changes to the dessert menu. “Summer created a formula that works,” he said.

Photo by Greg Rannells

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Save Room for Dessert

The Scoop: Gallinas to open Vicia in The Cortex

• The Scoop: Chef Michael Gallina to open series of pop-ups, new restaurant in native STL

Best New Restaurants 2015: No. 5 – Reeds American Table

 

Editor’s note: This post originally misspelled Ashley Rouch’s name. It was updated at 2:45 p.m. on Dec. 23 to correct the error. It was also updated at 4:40 p.m. to include an additional quote from Tara Gallina. 

 

The Scoop: Chef Chris Ladley to depart Quincy Street Bistro after two years

Friday, October 21st, 2016

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After two years, Chris Ladley is departing Quincy Street Bistro. His final dinner service is today, Oct. 21. Ladley had been executive chef since Chris Tirone departed in November 2015.

Ladley said he plans to take a break from the fast-paced workload of a chef, take a vacation and help some of his friends with restaurant projects. “I just realized that I’m not getting any younger,” he said. “I’ve been at Quincy for two years now, and they’re at a really good place with the menu so I decided to take a little break,” he said. Ladley’s resume includes time as executive chef at Herbie’s Vintage ’72, as well as PastariaBrasserie and The Dubliner.

Ladley said Quincy Street Bistro owners Mike and Sue Enright will continue business as usual this weekend, and he anticipates a smooth transition to a new, yet-to-be-named chef. “A lot of people here have been here for years, and we’ve become this functional family, so I’m kind of bummed to leave, but at the same time I’m looking forward to recharging the batteries,” he said. “I’m stoked about the dining scene that has been evolving in the city, and I want to stay a part of it for sure.”

Co-owner Mike Enright declined to comment on the transition at this time.

The Scoop: Anne Croy leaves Pastaria, to focus on Banner Road

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

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After four years at Niche Restaurant Group, Anne Croy has left her position as Pastaria’s executive pastry chef. Her last day was Thursday, Sept. 1, as reported by Feast.

Croy said she intends to focus on her business, Banner Road Baking Co. “Banner road is a wholesales specialty food business,” she said. Currently, she sells four varieties of granola under the Banner Road name. She hopes to expand her distribution throughout the Midwest and add more flavors and products like energy bars, granola bars, cookies and crackers.

“Anne makes some of the best granola in the world, and we’re proud to still serve her recipe at Pastaria,” said Niche Food Group owner Gerard Craft.

 

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Croy worked at Pastaria’s since it opened in 2012. “I’ve been able to work with some of the finest chefs in the city,” she said. “I just had an amazing team, and I’m really excited about what (executive chef Ashley Shelton) is doing with the restaurant.”

Craft said Sardella executive pastry chef Sarah Osborn has taken over pastry operations and will develop desserts for Pastaria and Taste. She will also have a hand in developing gelato pop flavors for Porano.

Pastaria Nashville executive pastry chef Mathew Rice has been named Niche Food Group executive pastry chef and will work with Osborn to develop the gelato programs at Pastaria and Porano, as well as the overall dessert programs at Pastaria and Taste.

Rice said he looks forward to the added responsibilities, as well as more frequent trips back to St. Louis. “This will keep me involved in the St. Louis food scene, so that’s something I’m excited about,” Rice said.

 

Catherine Klene contributed to this report. 

 

The Scoop: Ben McArthur leaves J. McArthur’s kitchen, Will Volny steps in

Monday, August 29th, 2016

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{Chef Ben McArthur}

 

A little more than a year after opening his first restaurant, chef Ben McArthur has left J. McArthur’s An American Kitchen. The announcement was posted on J. McArthur’s Facebook page yesterday, Aug. 28.

Co-owner Kathleen Bibbins said McArthur has “decided to pursue some other opportunities.” McArthur opened the Lindenwood Park restaurant in July 2015 with Bibbins (his stepmother) and his father, John McArthur. Bibbins said she and John McArthur will continue their ownership with a new chef at the helm, Will Volny.

“He’s going to carry on with the original concept that’s been developed,” Bibbins said, “He was recommended to us by a lot of people.”

Volny, who most recently served as chef at Bixby’s, said J. McArthur’s farm-to-table focus aligns with his own desire to work with area producers. “Over the last three years, I’ve build a lot of relationships with farmers doing the CSA at The Libertine and working at Bixby’s,” he said.

While regulars can rest assured that J. McArthur’s popular scallops entree isn’t going anywhere, Volny intends to add a few regular menu items like a steak and a burger.

Ben McArthur did not immediately return requests for comment.

 

The Scoop: Molly’s adds new exec chef, dining room

Monday, August 8th, 2016

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Molly’s in Soulard is growing with a new dining room and a new executive chef, Brandon Busby, who took the helm early last week.

Most recently sous chef at Copper Pig, Busby also has prior experience at The Shaved Duck, Evangeline’s, Planter’s House and Revel Kitchen. He has also built a reputation on coordinating Taco Tuesdays at Ryder’s Tavern, which he will continue while putting his stamp on Molly’s menu.

“I’m definitely working on new menu items now and making changes, like tweaking the gumbo and jambalaya recipes,” said Busby. “I’m going to bring over my five most famous tacos, and I want to step up the game on the bar food and make stuff from scratch.”

New menu items will include duck confit tacos and fried cheese curds and hand-dipped corn dogs, both featuring batter made with 4 Hands brews. Busby said guests can expect menu changes to start kicking in by next month.

Molly’s patrons can dig into these new offerings in a new 1,100-square-foot dining room. It seats 60 guests, and that capacity doubles when they step outside to a connecting 500-square-foot outdoor bar and patio area. The space opened to the public last Friday, Aug. 5

“That space originally had a structure that was considered a historic site and involved lots of negotiating with the city before we could knock it down to expand,” said owner Luke Reynolds. The space will allow Molly’s to host more private events.

 

 

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