Hello Stranger | Login | Create Account
 
 
 
 
 
  SAUCE MAGAZINE
|
Nov 23, 2017
|
Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
|
SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
Email | Text-size: A | A | A

Posts Tagged ‘Cherokee Street’

Vista Ramen chef-owner shares plans for Mothership at Earthbound

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

Executive chef and co-owner Chris Bork created a menu inspired by several Asian cultures. Dishes include  Japanese ramen, Thai sausage and Korean fried chicken.

 

Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will land the Mothership at Earthbound Beer this winter.

As The Scoop reported in August, Earthbound Beer announced Bork would helm the kitchen at its new location at 2724 Cherokee St., which opened in September, but the concept was still in the works. Now, Bork has announced the initial menu lineup and a tentative opening timeline, as reported by Feast.

“My inspiration was to find a niche on Cherokee that didn’t exist,” Bork said. “We really just bought a smoker and built the menu around that.”

 

11317_mothershiplogo

 

While bowls of ramen won’t make the move to Mothership, Bork has put together a tight inaugural menu focusing on smoked meats. In addition to a rotating barbecue plate, Mothership will feature smoked turkey with pita, sumac, pickles and yogurt; smoked chicken chili with cottage cheese and pickled daikon; a veggie burger topped with fontina, Kewpie mayo, lettuce and red onion; and kielbasa with mustard and onions.

Sides also follow the barbecue theme: beans, potato salad and coleslaw, along with a variety of kimchi and pickles. House sauces will include pomegranate, root beer, Carolina, Korean barbecue and vinegar. Hawaiian rolls with gochujang honey butter will round out the offerings.

Bork said some of the new menu items will be available at Earthbound’s third anniversary party, scheduled for Friday, Nov. 17, and Mothership should open “a week or two after Thanksgiving.”

Photo by Michelle Volansky; logo courtesy of Chris Bork 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content

• Vista Ramen will helm kitchen at new Earthbound location

• First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

• Trendwatch: What’s on your plate and in your glass in St. Louis now

First Look: Saint Louis Hop Shop on Cherokee Street

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

HopShop_12

 

After being closed for nearly a month, Saint Louis Hop Shop recently reopened at its new location 2600 Cherokee St., offering a larger selection of beverages for craft beer connoisseurs and beginners alike.

At the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Cherokee Street, the 1,500-square-foot storefront is a few doors down from its former address at 2606 Cherokee St., but it gives co-owners and brothers Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin nearly double the space to grow.

“[The other space] was small and we could see that we needed more room,” Harris said. “We really liked what we developed over there, and the goal is to bring that same formula over here and expand on it.”

The new location offers increased refrigeration and more shelving for beer, apparel and glassware. Additionally, a larger variety of ciders, spirits and imports, including more Belgium and lambic options, will be available. The new Hop Shop also features a larger bar area with six rotating taps. Harris said guests can expect a different brew every seven to 10 days.

“We do a lot of sixth barrels, so that gives us the flexibility to constantly bring in new stuff,” Harris said.

Brews currently on top include Dogfish Head Lupu-Luau Coconut IPA, Modern Brewery Citrapolicious, Ace Pineapple Cider, Prairie Artisan Ale Birthday Bomb, Urban Chestnut O-Katz and 4 Hands Chocolate Milk Stout.

With more space, Harris and Griffin also plan to host monthly events and weekly tastings through October. “It gives people a chance to come in and try some seasonal stuff before having to purchase it,” Harris said.

Saint Louis Hop Shop hosts a grand reopening this Saturday, Oct. 7 from noon to 10 p.m. The new location is open Monday through Thursday from noon to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday noon to 10 p.m., and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from Hop Shop’s new home:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Caitlin Lally 

Caitlin Lally is a contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
What I Do: Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin of Saint Louis Hop Shop

Beer bottle shop to open on Cherokee Street

Guide to the Holidays 2016: Bottles of Good Cheer

First Look: Earthbound Beer on Cherokee Street

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

Earthbound_02

 

At long last, Earthbound Beer’s new home is ready to welcome customers. The brewery and tasting room at 2724 Cherokee St., opens Saturday, Sept. 23.

The massive 2,500-square foot tasting room has been a project two years in the making. As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners and brewers Stuart Keating, Rebecca Schranz and Jeff Siddons announced they were moving from their flagship location down the street at 2710 Cherokee St. The space was less than 1,000 square feet and only allowed the brewers to make one beer at a time.

Eight old Earthbounds could fit into the new space that once housed part of Cherokee Street Brewing in the late 1800s. The tasting room seats around 80 on the first level and mezzanine, a feature designed by architecture and general contractor Nathan Dirnberger. The mezzanine appears to float above the tasting room thanks to railings made of tension wire and heavy-duty chains suspended from the 17-foot barrel ceilings.

Read more: Go underground at Earthbound Beer during construction

Behind the bar, 16 taps will pour Earthbound brews and a few guest taps, with another two nitro taps available. A small selection of spirits will be available (still no mixers or ice, the owners noted) with the potential for batch cocktails in the future. Earthbound patrons can now enjoy wine, too, with two reds, two whites and a rosé available by the glass.

Below the tasting room, a 7-barrel system will increase Earthbound’s production tenfold. The space also houses a canning line that will crank out 16-ounce four-packs of staple brews. Caves underneath neighbor 2720 Cherokee St. will allow for a barrel-aging program in the future.

As The Scoop reported in August, Vista Ramen chef-owner Chris Bork will helm the food program at Earthbound. The menu will feature smoked meats, sausages and sandwiches, though food won’t be available until November at the earliest.

Earthbound’s new location means new hours, too. It will be open Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from noon to midnight and Sunday from noon to 10 p.m. Here’s a first look at Earthbound Beer’s new home.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky 

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Vista Ramen will helm kitchen at new Earthbound location

Extra Sauce: Underground at Earthbound

Earthbound Beer to expand to new brewery on Cherokee

First Look: The Cut on Cherokee Street

Friday, September 1st, 2017

090117_thecut5

 

Ari Jo Ellis is sharpening her knives for the first service at The Cut, her new restaurant inside The Fortune Teller Bar at 2635 Cherokee St. Doors open tonight, Sept. 1, at 5 p.m.

As The Scoop reported in August, The Fortune Teller Bar’s owners approached Ellis (Sauce Ones to Watch class of 2016) with the opportunity to run a restaurant out of their kitchen a few months after The Little Dipper closed. Ellis has long had an interest in whole-animal butchery, working at Bolyard’s Meat & Provisions, Quincy Street Bistro, Southern and, most recently, Kitchen Kulture.

The Cut’s menu consists of five regular sausages and one special, along with a handful of side options. Customers can try classic bratwursts with beer mustard and sauerkraut or more creative options like the Cherokee-rizo, a nod to the neighborhood’s Mexican heritage. Plant-based eaters won’t be left out, either, with a tofu-based sausage using local Mofu tofu, navy beans, nutritional yeast and spices. All sausages are served on buns from Vitale’s Bakery.

Side options include backyard grilling classics like baked beans and cole slaw, as well as Rap Snacks chips and a “wild card” side that will change depending on that week’s produce delivery.

Ellis will break down about two whole hogs a week (sourced from Such and Such Farms) to create her sausages and some condiments and specials. Ellis said she also hopes to sell some cuts and links for customers to prepare at home.

The Cut will be open Wednesday to Saturday from 5 p.m. to midnight and Sunday from 4 to 11 p.m. Here’s a first look at what to expect from The Cut inside Fortune Teller Bar tonight:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos by Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Ari Jo Ellis to open The Cut inside The Fortune Teller Bar

Ones to Watch 2016: Ari Ellis

• Best New Restaurants 2016: No. 3 – Southern

Frankly Sausages announces details, location on Cherokee Street

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

FranklySausage_03

 

Frankly Sausages now has an official address for its new concept: 2744 Cherokee St.

As The Scoop reported in July, Frankly Sausages co-owners Bill and Jamie Cawthon announced their intent to open a brick-and-mortar location somewhere on Cherokee Street. Now, the concept and the exact location have been revealed, as reported by St. Louis Magazine.

Jamie Cawthon said the restaurant will be called Frankly on Cherokee in the space that once was home to Calypso Cafe. The space will have 38 seats.

“It’s an expansion on the concept,” Cawthon said. “We’re going to have shareable plates, and Bill is going to do a weekend dinner plate that will be completely different from us before, and it’ll be different every weekend.”

There will also be a monthly featured sausage made with ingredients from a local farm.

Frankly fans can get a taste of the new menu at Cherokee Beach this Saturday, Aug. 19 from 5 to 10 p.m., including a duck sausage from Grand Army Farm and desserts.

There will be additional pop-ups scheduled leading up to the grand opening, which Cawthon said should be in early October.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
Frankly Sausages to open brick and mortar on Cherokee

• Best New Food Trucks 2016

• Sneak Peek: Frankly Sausages Food Truck

The Scoop: Frankly Sausages to open brick and mortar on Cherokee

Friday, July 14th, 2017

FranklySausage_03

 

Another local food truck is going the brick-and-mortar route. Frankly Sausages co-owner Jamie Cawthon confirmed a lease has been signed on a location.

“We’re on Cherokee Street,” said Cawthon, adding the address isn’t being released yet. “We’re still doing some negotiating and bidding on a lot of the work, so it’s still pretty early. We don’t have an opening date.”

Jamie and chef Bill Cawthon launched their popular food truck in December 2015.

Cawthon said the new space would have a larger menu than what’s available on the truck. As things progress, she said the plan is to hold pop-up events in the area to try out dishes.

“You’ll see more than sausages and fries,” she said. “It’s still going to be in the style of Frankly Sausages.”

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine.

Related Content
Best New Food Trucks 2016

Sneak Peek: Frankly Sausages Food Truck

The Scoop: Tiny tea shop Teatopia opens on Cherokee Street

 

The Scoop: El Morelia Supermercado owners to open The Taco & Ice Cream Joint

Friday, April 14th, 2017

041317_cherokee

 

More tacos and ice cream are coming to Cherokee Street. The team behind El Morelia Supermercado in Bridgeton will open The Taco & Ice Cream Joint at 2738 Cherokee St., at the end of April, as reported by St. Louis Magazine.

Building on the success of the Bridgeton market’s popular Taco & Ice Cream weekend brunch, The Taco & Ice Cream Joint will offer a wide variety of street tacos alongside house-made ice cream and paletas, Mexican ice pops.

Karen Rico, daughter and business partner of owner Salvador Rico, said the new restaurant gives the El Morelia team a chance to innovate. “It’ll be really unique, not just tacos, but different types of ribs and make-your-own burrito and taco stations. We’ll also have all our usual ice cream flavors ­– mango, coconut, Mexican Twinkie, the favorites, and some new, exotic flavors we’ve been coming up with,” she said.

El Morelia will continue its weekend brunch service. Rico said they plan to open The Taco & Ice Cream Joint daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.

 

Sam Flaster is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

Photo courtesy of Google Street View

Related Content
The Scoop: Tiny tea shop Teatopia opens on Cherokee Street

Short List: Tacos al Pastor

First Look: The B-Side on Cherokee Street

The Scoop: Local restaurants participate, support A Day Without Immigrants protest

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

120116_nixta1

{ from left, Nixta executive chef Tello Carreón and owner Ben Poremba } 

 

Across the country today, Feb. 16, people stayed home from work and school or did not shop or eat out in support of A Day Without Immigrants, a protest against current U.S. immigration policy. Participants meant to illustrate the importance of immigrants in American society.

Chefs around the country donated a portion of their revenues to support immigration organizations or closed their eateries entirely, like José Andrés in Washington D.C. and Rick Bayless in Chicago. Locally, a handful of area restaurants did the same.

Chef and restaurateur Ben Poremba decided to close Nixta, his new Mexican eatery, as reported by the Riverfront Times. Poremba said many of his staff had expressed a desire to take the day off to participate.

“I’m not trying to be a pioneer,” he said. “I just respected that some of the guys wanted a day to be heard without worrying about losing their job or having some consequences. I didn’t want to be on the fence.”

Cherokee Station Special Business District liaison Anne McCullough said most of the immigrant-owned businesses on Cherokee closed today. “More than 20 percent of the businesses and properties on Cherokee Street are immigrant-owned,” she said.

 

011316_localchefstl

{ Local Chef Kitchen chef-owner Rob Uyemura } 

 

Local Chef Kitchen chef-owner Rob Uyemura also shut the doors at his Ballwin Restaurant for the day. “In 25 years in the restaurant business, I’ve worked with a lot of immigrants,” said Uyemura, whose family immigrated to the U.S. “They get labeled as criminals and illegals, and that’s wrong.”

Other restaurants remain open, but are donating a portion of their proceeds to nonprofits. Demun Oyster Bar general manager Tom Halaska said his bar, as well as sister restaurants Sasha’s Wine Bars and Scarlett’s Wine Bar, will donate 50 percent of the day’s proceeds to the International Institute St. Louis.

Halaska said it was important to recognize the many immigrants who participate in the restaurant industry and in society. With immigration policy currently in the national spotlight, he said this was a good opportunity to celebrate immigrants.

“This is a way for us as a restaurant group to show respect and compassion for what’s going on in the country,” Halaska said.

 

Catherine Klene contributed to this report.

Nixta photo by Carmen Troesser

 

The Scoop: Tiny tea shop Teatopia opens on Cherokee Street

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017

020217_teatopia

 

Looking for an alternative to your daily cup of joe? Check out Teatopia, which opened its doors at 2619½ Cherokee St., on Monday, Jan. 30, as reported by the Riverfront Times.

Owner Reginald “Reo” Quarles said he looked at more than 20 spots on his quest to open Teatopia, but none seemed quite right. Then he ran across the small Cherokee space, the former home of The Little Dipper sandwich shop. With just room enough for three tables, “it was a perfect fit.” Its diminutive size makes it easy for one person to operate, a definite benefit since Teatopia is basically a one-man show, with Quarles handling most of the daily duties.

Teatopia offers a wide variety of teas – 40 at last count – including varieties from Sri Lanka, India and other Asian countries, available to sip on site. Quarles also has created custom tea blends, like chocolate chai made with black tea, vanilla white chai and chocolate. He can also make custom blends to suit individual tastes. One-ounce containers of tea leaves are available to purchase and brew at home.

Teatopia also has a food menu, featuring salads, wraps and a selection of baked goods. Even some of the food is tea-focused, including a tea vinaigrette and tea-infused cream cheeses. “I was attracted to the tranquility of tea, the calming effect of tea,” said Quarles, who is also a vegan and martial artist. “It’s like all of what I believe in coming together.”

Quarles said his first few days of business have been good, and the Cherokee Street community has been receptive. “Everyone has welcomed me with open arms,” he said.

 

Related Content
The Scoop: Little Dipper to reopen inside The Fortune Teller Bar

Hit List: 7 new places you must try this February

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it… 

Best New Restaurants: No. 2 – Vista Ramen

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

To be the best, everything matters – atmosphere, service and food. Here, the places that dazzled us from the moment they opened: St. Louis’ 10 Best New Restaurants of 2016.

 

120116_vistaramen

{ from left, general manager Aaron Stovall, chef Chris Bork and sous chef Zach Siecinski }

 

A glimpse through the large windows at Vista Ramen reveals a slim restaurant filled with smartly dressed young people sipping sake and slurping ramen, bathed in the green glow of that iconic neon sign. This is where the cool kids eat.

The centerpiece is the open kitchen where co-owner and chef Chris Bork transmutes Vista’s chic style from the space to the plates. Bork interprets classic Asian dishes or finds inspiration entirely elsewhere, letting ingredients take the lead. While it’s easy to love something like sticky pork ribs glazed with crab caramel, it’s the attention paid to humble vegetables that sets Vista apart.

Bork is a standard bearer for seasonality, allowing vegetables to express themselves fully on the plate. Take, for example, his raw vegetable salad: Julienned Japanese turnips, carrots, radishes and kohlrabi are tossed with maple vinaigrette, lychee and house-made Chinese bacon and topped with popped sorghum.

Despite the complex, dynamic flavors, Bork’s methods don’t require expensive equipment or extravagant technique. “The treatment is very simple: Don’t fucking cook them to mush,” he said. “Being able to cook a specific vegetable to its right al dente is something that takes time and a lot of finesse. Blanching vegetables properly is an art that I wish more cooks took seriously.”

Vista’s veggie ramen best exemplifies this perfected technique. Vegetables of the moment (turnips, shiitakes, kohlrabi and so on) are individually blanched, then roasted on the flattop to order. Each vegetable retains its identity while swimming with tender alkaline noodles in a rich broth that coats every piece in meat-free umami glory.

After the last summer tomato disappears, it’s easy to give into seasonal despair in an endless parade of roasted root vegetables. Not at Vista. House-made agnolotti are filled with rich miso-pumpkin puree. Butternut squash finds its way into dessert as a delicate panna cotta sprinkled with buttery granola and topped with spheres of poached pear. For this kind of invention, we’ll gladly weather bitter temps and crowds of hipsters to indulge at Vista Ramen.

 

More about Vista Ramen

New and Notable: Vista Ramen

• Hit List: 4 new restaurants you must try this July

• Sneak Peek: Vista Ramen on Cherokee

• The Scoop: Chris Bork, Mud House owners to open Vista Ramen on Cherokee

 

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Editor’s note: In the print issue, we misspelled Vista Ramen’s name. We have updated this post and the online issue to correct the error. 

RSS FEEDS
Keep up with one or all of your favorite Sauce Magazine columns
Conceived and created by Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC 1999-2017, Bent Mind Creative Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Sauce Magazine 1820 Chouteau Ave. St. Louis, Missouri 63103.
PH: 314-772-8004 FAX: 314-241-8004