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Mar 22, 2018
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6 St. Louis breweries with great food

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

We know they make great beer, but area breweries have stepped up their gastronomic game, too. Some, like Schlafly and Civil Life Brewing Co., hire in-house talent; others partner with established concepts, as 2nd Shift Brewing did with Guerrilla Street Food. Still other breweries and chefs aim for something exciting and new (we’re looking you, Rockwell Beer Co. and Niche Food Group). Whether you’re hunting for tasty vegetarian ’cue or classic German fare to accompany that Pilsner, these six area breweries offer so much more than great beer.




1. Perennial Artisan Ales
Chef Kaleigh Brundick works wonders with a hot plate and panini press. Perennial’s menu changes weekly, but the humble grilled cheese with thick slabs of fontina, Prairie Breeze and a rotating jam (right now, it’s onion-thyme) is a constant that satisfies our inner child and our indulgent adult. (Pro tip: Accompany each bite with a Kicker Billy Goat chip for the perfect spicy/gooey/salty combo.) There’s always a locally sourced seasonal salad or tartine, each thoughtfully composed with pickled/shaved/raw/roasted elements that elevate this brewery fare to so much more than utilitarian snacks for continued drinking.



2. Heavy Riff Brewing Co.
Some of St. Louis’ best vegetarian barbecue is found at a rock-n-roll Dogtown brewery. Heavy Riff’s seitan actually spends significant time in the smoker and doesn’t require a deluge of sauce to make it enjoyable. Before you roll your eyes and jump to the next brewery on this list, pause and pay respect to Heavy Riff’s monster Reuben. This mountain of house-cured and smoked brisket, gooey cheese, kraut and smoked Thousand Island dressing is a force to be reckoned with. And everyone can agree to break Heavy Riff’s spent-grain beer bread; slather each dense slice with green onion cream cheese or orange-tinged butter.




3. Urban Chestnut Brewery and Bierhall
On any given night, the long wood tables at Urban Chestnut Brewing Co.’s massive Bierhall are laden with pints and trays of schnitzel, sausages and paper bags of pomme frites. We’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: Eat. These. Fries. Order a large – for yourself – with garlic mayo and fry sauce, and live your best life. UCBC chef Andy Fair has a knack for making heavy German dishes seem lighter than they are, like the ethereal salt cod brandade beignets with house tartar sauce and puffy cinnamon-sugar churros (a decidedly not German dessert) with warm chocolate sauce.




4. 4 Hands Brewing Co.
James Beard Award-winner Kevin Nashan and sous chef John Messbarger bring a taste of Peacemaker Lobster and Crab Co. to 4 Hands, right down to the brisket po’boy and seasoned potato chips. The chopped salad lulls you into a false sense of health; surely the mountain of romaine and tomatoes (covered in ranch, bacon, egg and avocado) means you deserve another beer. We opt to split platters of meaty peel-and-eat Gulf shrimp with house cocktail sauce. Just wash your hands before you faceoff on “Tapper” – no one likes a shellfish-scented joystick.



5. Earthbound Beer
The quirky Earthbound crew has always championed Cherokee Street, so naturally they partnered with neighbor Vista Ramen to helm the brewery’s food program. Mothership is the meal you’d eat if Vista chefs Chris Bork and Josh Adams invited you to a backyard barbecue in North Carolina. Ascend to the floating mezzanine with a mushroom-y veggie burger (doctored with house Carolina mustard sauce and extra pickles, per Adams’ advice), all the sides and cornbread so good, you’d swear they stole the recipe from someone’s unsuspecting southern granny, if not for the gochugang-honey butter on the side.




6. Narrow Gauge Brewing Co.
Yes, dear reader, we know this Italian-American eatery was around long before Narrow Gauge co-owner Jeff Hardesty brewed in the basement, but Cugino’s has become the de facto tasting room for Hardesty’s stellar Northeast IPAs. Cugino’s unpretentious meaty, cheesy menu hits the spot after a drink or two. Exhibit A: Softball-sized meatballs, stuffed with a glob of Provel, then breaded and deep fried like a carnivore’s arancini. Crack them open and watch the cheese lava ooze. Exhibit B: The Luigi burger, the simplest on the menu, still weighs in at a whopping half-pound and is smothered with bacon and four cheeses. It’s not healthy, it’s not diet-friendly – and we’re so happy.


Photos by David Kovaluk, Izaiah Johnson and Meera Nagarajan

Catherine Klene is managing editor, digital at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2018

Readers’ Choice 2017: Favorite Breweries

• Brewer in the Basement: How Jeff Hardesty made Narrow Gauge Brewing Co. an underground sensation


17 St. Louis beer festivals to hit in 2018

Thursday, March 1st, 2018



Grab your calendar, prepare your liver and save the dates. St. Louis is awash in beer festivals this year.

1.Buzz’d Beer Festival
March 4 – The Old Bakery Beer Co., Alton, oldbakerybeer.com
Alton is abuzz about this festival that coincides with the third anniversary of The Old Bakery Beer Co. More than 20 breweries feature beer with flowers, honey and fruit that celebrate local pollinators. Tickets available online and at Old Bakery Beer.

2. Ales for Tails
March 10 – American Czech Educational Center, St. Louis, ales4tails.eventbrite.com
Support Tenth Life Cat Rescue and Needy Paws Dog Rescue while enjoying beer from places like Burr Oak Brewery and Crown Valley brewery, dozens of homebrews, and a pet-themed marketplace. Tickets available online.

3. FestivAle
March 23 – Union Station, St. Louis, festivalestl.com
Get your ale fix and support the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at this event featuring more than 40 brewers like Boulevard Brewing Co. and WellBeing Brewing. Then, chow down on food provided by vendors like Café Piazza. Tickets available online.

4. Schlafly Stout & Oyster Festival
March 23 and 24 – Schlafly Tap Room, St. Louis, schlafly.com
Few things are better than bivalves and beer. Schlafly flies in 80,000 oysters and more than 20 shuckers for this free event where guests can slurp and sip more than 15 Schlafly stouts.

5. Columbia Trails Homebrew Festival
April 14 – Borsch Park, Valmeyer, Illinois, Facebook: Columbia Trails Homebrew Festival
Sample more than 60 beers from more than 25 homebrewers and vote for your favorite – the winner will have their beer on tap at Stubborn German Brewing Co. Tickets available online or at the event.

6. St. Louis Microfest
May 4 and 5 – Upper Muny Parking Lot, St. Louis, stlmicrofest.org
This two-day festival features more than 125 craft and international breweries like Old Bakery Beer Co., Kirkwood Station Brewing Co. and Peel Brewing Co. Stick around for live music, food from Mission Taco Joint, Bogart’s Smokehouse and The Dam. Tickets available online.

7. Manchester Craft Beer Festival
May 12 – Paul A. Schroeder Park, Manchester, manchestermo.gov/beerfest
Sample more than 20 local and national craft breweries including Civil Life Brewing Co., Urban Chestnut Brewing Co. and Goose Island, and dig into food provided by vendors like Nothing Bundt Cakes and Philly Pretzel Factory. Tickets available online or at Circle 7 Ranch.

8. Lupulin Carnival
May 19 – Union Station, St. Louis, lupulincarnival.com
More than 70 national and local breweries join 4 Hands Brewing Co.’s annual carnival, including 2nd Shift Brewing, Six Mile Bridge Beer, Against the Grain and Transient Artisan Ales. Don’t miss the aerial acrobatics and Ferris wheel. Tickets available online.

9. Daniel Boone Homebrew Fest
May 19 – Historic Daniel Boone Home, Defiance, Facebook: Daniel Boone Home Brew Fest
History meets homebrew at this festival featuring local clubs like STL Brewminati and Garage Brewers Society, in addition to breweries like Third Wheel Brewing and Augusta Brewing Co. Tickets available online.

10. IndiHop
June 2 – The Grove and Cherokee Street, indihopstl.com
One festival, two neighborhoods, 50 different beers – 25 storefronts in The Grove and Cherokee Street host local breweries. Stop, sip, shop and then hop on the trolley to the other neighborhood. Tickets will be available online.

11. Criderfest
June 9 – 2nd Shift Brewing Co, St. Louis, 2ndshiftbrewing.com
Around 50 local and regional breweries pour at this Pink Floyd-themed festival at 2nd Shift Brewing. Dig into food by Guerrilla Street Food and coffee by Blueprint Coffee and Dark Matter Coffee. A cover band provides the tunes. Tickets will be available online.

12. Heritage Festival
July 14 – Forest Park Grand Basin, St. Louis, stlbeer.org
Heritage Festival returns to Forest Park for a single four-hour event. Enjoy pours from more than 50 St. Louis Brewers Guild members like Square One Brewing Co., Urban Chestnut and Charleville Brewing Co. Tickets will be available online in April.

13. St. Louis Craft Beer Week
July 27 to Aug. 4 – St. Louis, stlbeerweek.com
Celebrate our city’s rich beer heritage with nine days of events, from beer dinners to trivia nights to tap takeovers. Don’t miss one of the week’s highlights, the Midwest Belgian Beer Fest on July 28. Tickets and complete schedule will be available online.

14. Hop in the City
Sept. 15 – The Schlafly Tap Room, St. Louis, schlafly.com
Sample all that Schlafly has to offer at its annual outdoor festival with unlimited pours of almost everything, from the hoppiest brews to the darkest stouts. Food is also available for purchase. Tickets will be available online.

15. Augusta Bottoms Beer Festival
Oct. 6 – Mel L. Fuhr Memorial Ball Field, Augusta, Facebook: Augusta Bottoms Beer Festival
Sip on brews and spirits from more than 40 breweries, homebrew associations and distilleries. Look for Two Plumbers Brewing Co., 4204 Main Street Brewing Co. and host Augusta Brewing Co. Tickets will be available online.

16. Brewers Guild Halloween Party
Oct. 27 – Lafayette Park, St. Louis, stlbeer.org
Don your most impressive Halloween costume and join the St. Louis Brewers Guild for a scary-good time. Sample beers, enter the costume contest and take a ride on the haunted Hefe Ride. Tickets will be available online.

17. The Great St. Louis Czech Beer Festival
Dec. 8 – American Czech Education Center, St. Louis, eventbrite.com
With more than 20 local breweries in attendance, this festival is worth Czech­-ing out. Previous attendees have included Schlafly, Firestone Walker and Leaky Road Meadery. Tickets will be available online.

Illustration by Vidhya Nagarajan

Claire Ma is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2018

• 8 can’t-miss beers at Urban Chestnut’s Wolpertinger Festival

• 3 can’t-miss beers at the Brewers Guild Halloween Party

10 reasons to try nonalcoholic WellBeing Beer (even if you drink)

Thursday, March 1st, 2018



WellBeing Brewing Co. debuted last year with its Heavenly Body NA Golden Wheat, followed quickly by the Hellraiser NA Dark Amber. The nonalcoholic brews caught the imagination of craft imbibers after a sober good time. Here are 10 reasons not to roll your eyes at WellBeing’s buzz-free beer.

1. It actually tastes like beer. Even the light-bodied wheat has more going on than your typical metallic, NA water-lager.

2. Cutting-edge cred – the low-ABV trend is still alive and well, but there’s only one other NA-specific brewery in the US.

3. What hangover?

4. German athletes swear by NA beer over Gatorade for their sports drinking; it was downed liberally at the Winter Olympics. Regardless, with calorie counts around 75, the beers are worth a try for the fitness set.

5. DD duty just got a little less painful.

6. Widely available in bottles and kegs at 30-plus area spots and counting, you don’t have to go out of your way to find WellBeing.

7. If you want an NA option, it may as well be from a St. Louis small business.

8. If you’re pregnant, don’t drink or are even just a lightweight, explaining why you’re not drinking all the time gets old.

9. Guilt- (and nap-) free day drinking

10. The craft brewery is busy developing a range of different styles, starting with a citrus wheat and coffee stout. Soon, it may have an alcohol-free option for all tastes.

Photo courtesy of WellBeing Brewing Co. 

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
• Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2018

• Wellbeing Brewing Co. launches St. Louis’ first nonalcoholic brewery

• 4 must-try beer and chocolate pairings

The Scoop: New Craft Beer Cellar location to open in South City

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017


{ Craft Beer Cellar in Clayton }


A second Craft Beer Cellar is set to open in at 5760 Chippewa St., near the Hampton Village shopping center. Owner Brandon Nickelson is hoping to open doors at the beer-focused bottle shop by end of the year, as reported by Feast.

Nickelson, who co-owns the current Clayton location of Craft Beer Cellar with brother Ryan Nickelson, is helming this project solo. “[I] think South City is a really good fit and a very strong community,” he said. The Nickelsons opened in Clayton in May 2014; both brothers continue to own and operate that space.

Nickelson said South City is an underserved market for beer. As with its sister location, Craft Beer Cellar will carry hundreds of local, national and international brews for customers to purchase. It will also house more taps at the in-house bar – 15 to 16, Nickelson estimated – for customers to sample new or rare offerings.

“The new bar location should be a larger service bar with cozy seating,” he said. “It will definitely be a lot bigger.”

Nickelson said education will remain the backbone of the operation. “We do focus on education in our shops and we try to make sure everybody that comes into our shop has a wonderful time,” he said.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Bailey Synclaire is an editorial intern at Sauce Magazine. 

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DTWE: 7 cans to crush at Global Brew’s Can Jam

Friday, April 28th, 2017



Global Brew in Rock Hill is back with its annual Can Jam on Saturday, April 29. This celebration of canned beer from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. highlights the environmentally friendly nature of canning and outdoorsy breweries’ famed canned products.

I did my investigative research and got the can list, and attendees will be drinking some pretty rad and tasty, thirst-quenching beers – all perfect for outdoor drinking.

Of course, canning pioneer Oskar Blues Brewing Co. will be there with what I hear are some extremely fresh Pinner cans. 4 Hands Brewing Co. will crank out Contact High, one of my favorite seasonal St. Louis releases.

Ballast Point Brewing Co. will show up with tropical fruit bomb Mango Even Keel Session IPA, while Odell Brewing Co. will bring fruit and a little sourness to the party with its tart German-style blackberry gose, Brombeere. And if you are looking for those 16-ounce cans, Sierra Nevada will offer its flagship, hop-focused beauties, Pale Ale and Torpedo EPA.

Perhaps most intriguing to this beer can lineup is Left Hand Brewing Co.’s new seasonal, canned farmhouse release, Saison au Miel. Underlying layers of funk and soft floral notes from the Belgian yeast play nicely with the drying nature of the Colorado wildflower honey. You can’t go wrong with a fun twist on an old-school saison. Well done, Left Hand. Well done.

Photo courtesy of Left Hand Brewing Co. 

Katie Herrera is tasting room manager at The Side Project Cellar and co-founder of Femme Ferment.

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DTWE: 6 must-drink beers at Lupulin Carnival

Friday, March 24th, 2017



It’s almost time for 4 Hands Brewing Co.’s yearly hop-induced coma: Lupulin Carnival. It takes place April 1 at Union Station this year, and it means the return of carnival acts, the smell of dank IPAs (and sweaty festival goers) and the release of 4 Hands’ Imperial IPA, War Hammer. (Tickets are available online.)

Beer festivals can overwhelm, especially when the lineup is ridiculously amazing. Some of the best breweries in the IPA game pour at Lupulin, highlighting their prodigious hop usage. Heed some sage advice from an IPA fiend: Do not pass up that beer you’ve had before.

Why? With all the variations in hops, styles and brewing techniques, this is your chance to see just how versatile hops can be. Look for classic West Coast-style usage from Ballast Point or Stone Brewing Co., the trendy Northeast-style pale ales from local breweries like Narrow Gauge Brewing Co. and Shared, and game changers with some of the best hop experimentation in the game (i.e. Firestone Walker Brewing Co.’s Leo v. Ursus and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s Tropical Torpedo.)

There will be too many beers to try (because you will all be responsible drinkers), so prioritize with my six must-try beers at Lupulin 2017:

1. Yes, War Hammer is the guest of honor, but surprise! 4 Hands hopped up a Pilsner for its second City Wide offering. City Wide Pils is a Citra dry-hopped American Pilsner that’s perfect for crushing during the hot St. Louis summer.

2. If one Imperial IPA wasn’t enough, 4 Hands’ also debuts an Imperial wheat IPA, White Flannel, rumored to be aggressively hoppy with intense notes of tropical fruit.

3. Expect lots of hoppy goodies from Chicagoland breweries. One of Chicago’s finest breweries (IMHO), Half Acre Beer Co., brings Tuna Extra Pale, its 4.7-percent ABV brew ripe with citrus, tropical fruit and a slightly sweet malt bill to uphold that flavor.

4. Pipeworks Brewing Co. rolls in with Ninja vs. Unicorn, an unfiltered, balanced Imperial IPA with massive amounts of peach and citrus aromatics and extreme drinkability. Be careful, y’all – this one does not drink like it’s 8-percent ABV.

5. Mile Wide Beer Co., a new Louisville, Kentucky brewery and brainchild of former Schlafly brewer Kyle Tavares, brings Idlewild Pale Ale (5.5-percent ABV). This crisp, light-bodied pale ale sees a new hop addition every few months for a refreshing and fun take on the classic American style. It currently boasts Mosaic and Equinox hops for a dank and tropical fruit aroma.

6. Finally, try one of the first breweries that got me into the hop game: Ale Asylum. Its Velveteen Habit has juicy hop presence with a mildly sweet malt undertone is finished with a satiable bitterness. Look for light grassiness, citrus, pineapple and a little herbal character as you drink.

Photo by Ed Aller for 4 Hands Brewing Co.

Katie Herrera is tasting room manager at Side Project Cellar and co-founder of Femme Ferment.

Sauce Magazine is a sponsor of Lupulin Carnival.


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The Scoop: Kevin Nashan to launch new food program at 4 Hands

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017



{ brisket po’boy at Peacemaker Lobster & Crab Co. }


4 Hands Brewing Co. will debut a new food program at the brewery’s tasting room this Friday, Feb. 24, courtesy of chef Kevin Nashan.

The James Beard-nominated chef-owner of Sidney Street Cafe and Peacemaker Lobster & Crab created the menu with Peacemaker chef de cuisine, John Messbarger.

Most recently, Fifth Wheel Catering (owned by Baileys’ Restaurants) ran the 4 Hands food program. As The Scoop reported on Feb. 6, The Fifth Wheel left the brewery on Feb. 5 after five years in operation. Since then, Lemp has arranged a lineup of food trucks parked outside the brewery to feed hungry patrons.

Nashan and Messbarger’s menu features a variety of soups, snacks and sandwiches including beer cheese soup, smoked whitefish dip, a bratwurst braised in 4 Hands beer and a brisket po’boy. Nashan and Messbarger will also handle catering duties for events at 4 Hands.

4 Hands owner Kevin Lemp said he looked forward to teaming up with Nashan again after the two collaborated on a exclusive Peacemaker witbier. “I have such respect for Kevin and his team and everything they do,” Lemp said. “We thought this was a great way to work together again.” He said since Nashan’s Benton Park restaurants are near the brewery, they could be easily be used as commissaries.

Lemp said that Messbarger’s affinity for craft beer was also a plus. “He really understands what foods pair well with beers,” he said.

Nashan said the opportunity to work with Lemp was “a no-brainer.” “It’ll be beer pub food done our way,” he said. “It’ll be a lot of fun.”

Photo courtesy of Peacemaker

Ones to Watch 2017: Troy Bedik of Civil Life Brewing Co.

Sunday, January 1st, 2017



Title: Brewer, Civil Life Brewing Co.
Age: 29
Why watch her: She does whatever she wants.

Before she became a professional brewer, Troy Bedik concocted a homebrew recipe so good, Steve Crider of 2nd Shift Brewing mass produced it. Now, after recently landing the highly competitive and coveted position of brewer at Civil Life, she’s already developed a Kölsch recipe owner Jake Haefner declared a favorite of the past year.

Considered one of the most passionate in the field by her peers, this won’t be the last time you hear about Bedik. But first, hear it in her words:

“I love getting my hands dirty – it’s my favorite part of what I do. I like being on my feet all day, moving around, getting to move heavy things. I like having a job where I’m physically crafting something. I can brew the beer, package the beer, put the beer on draft and then enjoy the beer. It’s the ultimate satisfaction.”

“The craft beer world can be a very intimidating environment for women. It’s gotten better, but you have to fight for people to take you seriously, to prove that you know what you’re talking about. It’s good to have a strong support group.”

“I always get the joke from people: ‘Oh, you’re a brewer – where’s your beard?’ Sometimes if I’m wearing a dress, I wonder if it automatically discredits me because I don’t look the part. I think people mean well by it, but you don’t have to look a certain way – like a 30-year-old bearded guy. There’s room for everybody.”

“One of my favorite moments while working at Civil Life was one day when I was wearing my big work boots, work shorts, a headlamp and safety glasses, and I walked into the bathroom and saw this little 5-year-old girl.

“She asked me, ‘Why are you dressed like that?’

“And I said, ‘I’m a brewer. I work over there.’

“Her eyes got wide and she said, ‘That’s so cool!’ Then she ran over and told her dad.

“I loved it because she saw that you can have a job that lets you get a little dirty – you can do whatever you want to do.”

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Drink This Weekend Edition: Katie’s 12 Beers of Christmas

Friday, December 16th, 2016

As a toast to 2016, I have decided to share my 12 beers of Christmas with Sauce readers. Some are seasonal, some are year-round favorites, but all are easily accessible beers I will drink and/or have stocked in my fridge this time of year.

Disclaimer: This list isn’t ranked in any way. Also, I really like canned beer – half this list is available in cans. Happy 2016, y’all, and cheers to a bright 2017!


1. 4 Hands Incarnation
This is my go-to local IPA – single-hopped with Mosaic (a personal favorite), canned, always fresh AF on draft at the brewery, and an overall beautifully built beer.

2. Blaugies La Moneuse Special Winter
If I had to choose a holiday beer, this would be it – mellow tartness followed by bright citrus notes and a light, funky yeast presence.

3. Bud Light Lime
You heard me. Put her in a bucket with five of her sisters because it’s Packer season. Limey, grainy and just refreshing enough to keep going back for that next bucket or two. #GoPackGo

4. Civil Life Porter
On draft, on cask, out of a growler, this beer is perfect. Its medium body and velvety texture (especially on cask!) highlight the beautiful notes of coffee and chocolate that round out the palate.

5. Firestone Walker Pivo Pils
This is the beer the Side Project crew had in hand when we won Best in Show at the Firestone Walker Beer Invitational (obviously a highlight for 2016). With floral hops, light pepper and clean bitterness, it makes for an overall enjoyable experience.

6. Green Bench Grisette
A table beer from my favorite Florida brewery: light-bodied, dry and funky. Pair this beauty with anything on the dinner table.

7. Logboat Haller-Tang Pale
Absolutely my favorite new release of the year – clean, crisp and full of tropical fruit notes and satiable bitterness. Move over Pinner? Only 2017 will tell.

8. Left Hand Fade to Black, Vol. 1
If you made me choose, I’d put this beauty in my top five favorite beers. Only now its available in cans – so top three? Heavily roasted malt gives way to intense notes of coffee, chocolate, licorice and an aggressively bitter finish.

9. Oskar Blues Pinner
If you don’t know, now you know. This insanely crushable and fruit-forward session IPA was my most consumed beer of 2016. When in doubt, grab a Pinner – or four.

10. Schlafly Coffee Stout
Hands down, this is my most-anticipated seasonal St. Louis release: roasty and medium-bodied with intense notes of fantastically dirty diner coffee. Yes, I will take grit in my beer, please.

11. Sierra Nevada Narwhal
This is the first Imperial stout I fell in love with thanks to aggressive roast and intense chocolate. Let this bad boy warm up for full enjoyment with added notes of mellow smoke and espresso.

12. A good ‘ol bottle of rosé
The drier and bubblier the better. Not even I can drink beer all of the time.


Katie Herrera is tasting room manager at Side Project Cellar and co-founder of Femme Ferment.


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Sneak Peek: Side Project Brewing in Maplewood

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016



Beer nerd, prepare thyself. After nearly a year of anticipation, Side Project Brewing is opening its brewery and tasting room at 7458 Manchester Ave., in Maplewood on Sunday, Dec. 18.

As The Scoop reported in January, co-owners Cory and Karen King received the go-ahead to begin construction of the 2,500-square-foot space in Maplewood. Now the 20-barrel brewhouse is in full swing, and the Kings are ready to open.

The building, which once housed St. Louis Closet Company, now features bright white subway tile, picture windows and light wood tables and chairs made by Goebel & Co. Furniture. Patrons can grab a stool and watch brewers King and Brian Ivers at work through the large window looking into the brewhouse. Behind the bar, 11 taps will pour mostly Side Project beers, as well as a new collaborative label between King and Ivers – Shared.

While all Side Project beers spend time aging in oak barrels, Shared beers don’t have to be barrel-aged. King said this will allow them to create Pilsners, pale ales, IPAs and other styles best consumed fresh. Shared beers will also ready in a matter of weeks, not the months that Side Project beers require.

The brewery’s tasting room will only be open Saturday and Sunday from noon to 7 p.m., but those looking to get their weekday fix can still visit  The Side Project Cellar, which remains open just around the corner from the brewery at 7373 Marietta Ave. During the holidays, the new brewery’s tasting room will be closed Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, but it will be open on New Year’s Eve.

Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect when the new space opens this Sunday:


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Photos by Michelle Volansky 


More about Side Project Brewing
The Rookie’s Guide to a Side Project Release
• Long Live the King
• The Scoop: 5 STL-area chefs, The Side Project Cellar, Stone Soup Cottage all earn JBFA nods
• The Scoop: Side Project Brewing receives approval to open brewery in Maplewood

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