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Mar 23, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘CWE’

The Scoop: Tazé to open second location in the CWE

Friday, March 3rd, 2017

 

Tazé Mediterranean Street Food is taking its fast-casual concept to the Central West End. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, co-owners Casey and Justin Roth will open a second location at 8½ S. Euclid Ave., in the space formerly occupied by Tortillaria Mexican Kitchen. Casey Roth said the restaurant should open in early summer.

The space will seat 35 to 45 seats inside with another 40 seats outside. The new Tazé will feature the same menu as the downtown flagship location at 626 Washington Ave., but it will also have what Roth described as “robust happy hour specials,” a tapas menu and entree specials. Roth said there will also cocktail offerings, beer and wine, to appeal to the Central West End clientele.

The Roths opened their first Tazé in June 2015. The restaurant specializes in build-your-own meals with Middle Eastern and Mediterranean influences.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Related Content
• The Scoop: Mission Taco Joint to open at the Streets of St. Charles, Tortillaria to close in CWE

• Sneak Peek: Tazé Mediterranean Street Food

• The Scoop: Tazé Mediterranean Street Food to open downtown

Extra Sauce: A tour of Herbie’s new space in Clayton

Thursday, December 29th, 2016

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It’s been a year of change for fine dining eatery Herbie’s Vintage ‘72. In May, owner Aaron Teitelbaum announced he would move the 8-year-old restaurant from its corner in the Central West End to the home of Cardwell’s in Clayton, which closed Oct. 1.

Herbie’s dropped the Vintage ’72 from its name when it moved into 8100 Maryland Ave., and opened doors to its new space in early November. Chef Chris Vomund recently took Sauce on a tour of the new 183-seat space.

 

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Customers stepping into the bar area will immediately recognize light fixtures, chairs and booths from the CWE space in a new home. Vomund said it was important to bring key elements of the former location’s character into the new restaurant. Large prints of 1920s liquor posters scattered throughout the dining area harken back to Herbie’s previous location.

 

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While many new restaurants trend toward light wood, Edison bulbs and communal tables, Herbie’s new dining room offers white tablecloths and privacy. Clusters of banquettes sectioned off by dark wood partitions and frosted glass create a sense of intimacy in the large space.

 

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A handful of additional rooms offer private dining for small six-person gatherings to larger soirees. Cardwell’s former wine room has been transformed into a 10-seat dining space equipped with a large television for presentations. And when warmer weather arrives, Herbie’s will add nearly 100 seats on its large patio that wraps around the corner from Maryland Avenue to Brentwood Boulevard.

 

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{ Herbie’s chef Chris Vomund }

 

Diners aren’t the only ones adjusting to the new space. Vomund is navigating a significantly smaller kitchen. He compared the move to downsizing from a house to a condo. However, he said this means his crew is more organized and operates more seamlessly than before, only one step away from each other.

While the dinner menu remains familiar, Vomund has added weekday lunch to serve the Clayton business crowd. The menu features soups, salads and sandwiches including a bison burger, a roasted beet Rueben and a BLTM (mozzarella, that is.) Seven heftier entrees are available for hungrier diners, such as bouillabaisse, steak frites and vegetable lasagna. Lunch is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Photos by Michelle Volansky

 Related Content
The Scoop: Herbie’s Vintage ’72 to move to Clayton, Cardwell’s in Clayton to close

Cooking the Classics: Chicken and Dumplings

The Scoop: Herbie’s owner to open chess-themed Kingside Diner in Central West End

Best New Restaurants: No. 7 – The Preston

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

To be the best, everything matters – atmosphere, service and food. Here, the places that dazzled us from the moment they opened: St. Louis’ 10 Best New Restaurants of 2016.

 

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Hotel bars aim for luxury and sophistication, but most miss the mark, landing in chintz and disappointment. The Preston at The Chase Park Plaza hits a rare bull’s-eye with stylish leather chairs, cool gray wainscoting and stiff drinks served in cut crystal glasses on a marble bar. The atmosphere is swanky, but still comfortable with a refined, masculine elegance.

Service at the bar and in the dining room strikes the sweet spot of being attentive without getting in the way of conversation, with a staff dressed as smartly as the room. Some original cocktails have a classic vibe, like Goodnight Mr. Preston, which stares you down with bourbon, Carpano Antica sweet vermouth, Benedictine and bitters. But others, like Smokey and The Bandito, have more drama with hickory smoke and poblano-infused tequila.

Pecan-encrusted pork tenderloin may sound like boring hotel food, but one bite of the ultra tender meat glazed in barbecue jus and pulled through the bright orange and green swirls of carrot and pea purees, and you’ll want to check into The Chase and spend the whole night. Before you pick up your room key, order the salty-sweet pretzel croissants – at any time of day, at any point in the meal; just get them.

And take a moment, as you’re cozied into the rounded plaid banquettes in dim, flattering lighting, to appreciate how rare it is to realize the fantasy of accommodations that aren’t just expensive, but downright glamorous.

 

More about The Preston

• First Look: The Preston in the Central West End

• Hit List: 6 must-try restaurants in March

Nightlife: The Preston

Photo by Jonathan Gayman

The Scoop: Di Olivas to open third location in CWE

Friday, November 18th, 2016

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Owner Robert Palleja has set plans in motion to open a third location of his olive oil and tasting vinegar specialty shop, Di Olivas. Located at 115 N. Euclid Ave., in the Central West End, the shop is slated to open sometime between mid-December and early January.

This will be the Palleja’s first move into St. Louis proper. The two other Di Olivas locations are located in St. Charles and West County. “My wife and I had been looking to make this move for a long time. It was just a matter of timing and of finding an appropriate location,” Palleja said.

The Central West End location will offer the same products as the other two, which includes roughly two dozen different olive oils (flavored and unflavored) and about three dozen vinegars. The shop is also going to feature hand-painted ceramic tanks used for pressing olive oil from Deruta, Italy, and a designated space for cooking demonstrations.

“What makes this store so special is our commitment to finding and buying the best products. Not only do we sell award-winning olive oils, we also try to participate in the actual production of the products as much as we can,” Palleja said.

 

Read more on Di Olivas
• The Scoop: Di Olivas dips deeper into olive oil market
• The Scoop: Di Olivas to bring premiere olive oils, vinegars and more to historic St. Charles

The Scoop: Nathalie’s to close Nov. 5  

Saturday, October 29th, 2016

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After nearly three years in business, Nathalie’s is closing doors at 4365 Lindell Blvd., in the Central West End. Owner Nathalie Pettus said the restaurant’s last day will be Saturday, Nov. 5, as reported by St. Louis Magazine.

Pettus, who also owns the 327-acre Overlook Farm in Clarksville, said operating two businesses so far from each other was too difficult to maintain. “It’s so bittersweet,” she said. “It’s just too much with two endeavors 65 miles apart.”

Pethus will sell the building (which also saw life as Salt and Savor) to focus on operations at Overlook Farm, which raises and sells chicken, beef, pork, duck, tilapia and catfish, and grows produce in 26 hoop houses. It also serves as a popular weekend getaway destination and event venue. “It’s really hard,” she said. “I expected to be walking around in the space when I’m in my 90s. “But I hope to one day come back and eat someone else’s food in the space.”

Nathalie’s opened in December 2013 and hosted regular entertainment acts, too. “The best part is getting to know the people,” Pettus said. “We’ve had some incredible guests and incredible musicians, some of St. Louis’ finest. It’s been very special getting to know them and getting to showcase them.”

 

 

The Scoop: Chef Carl Hazel takes helm at West End Grill & Pub

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

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After taking six months off, chef Carl Hazel is once again top toque in the kitchen. Hazel started as executive chef at West End Grill & Pub (WEGAP) on July 13.

As The Scoop reported in January, Hazel spent the majority of the last nine years running The Scottish Arms’ kitchen before departing at the beginning of the year. “The pub atmosphere is something I really enjoy,” he said. “(WEGAP) runs the gamut from super, super casual, cold beer and flip-flops at the bar to a really nice date-night place in the dining room.”

The 20-year industry veteran plans to change the menu’s focus to an emphasis on local, sustainably grown and responsibly raised ingredients, but he will balance that change with what restaurant regulars have come to know and love. “We’re definitely going to change things quite a bit, but we’ll be real careful not to lose the personality of WEGAP,” he said. “People are more aware of what we eat and what we put in our bodies.”

Hazel also said he plans to improve plating presentations and perhaps incorporate wild game dishes. “People will see more than the standard beef, chicken and pork choices,” he said.

In addition to the menu, the 8-year-old restaurant will also update its interior and beverage selections. Hazel anticipates the new menu will be released in mid-August. “I’m excited to be back in the kitchen, doing what I love to do,” he said.

 

-photo by Carmen Troesser

The Scoop: Jax Café closes doors, Kopperman’s and Tavern of Fine Arts also say farewell

Monday, July 11th, 2016

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{Jax Café}

 

Jax Café has closed doors for good. The Benton Park restaurant served its last meal Sunday, July 10. Co-owner Gina Seltzer said that while brunch business was brisk, the dinner crowd was too thin to keep the restaurant going.

“We were just hoping that with the addition of dinner a year and a half ago that business would pick up,” Seltzer said. “(Customers) became regular brunch patrons but never really sustained the dinner part of it, which is where we shine, so it’s unfortunate.”

Seltzer, who co-owned Jax Café with her husband David Seltzer along with chef Brian Hale, opened the restaurant in 2013. Sauce reviewed it in April 2014.

Another local favorite has closed after more than three decades. Kopperman’s Deli in the Central West End announced its closure on Friday, July 8. “After months of trying different combinations of hours and staffing, we realize that we cannot sustain operations at Kopperman’s,” the owners wrote in a Facebook post. “We have decided to close the business effective immediately. We appreciate everyone’s patronage over the nearly 34 years we’ve been open and will miss our many regular customers.” A recorded phone message at the New York-style deli confirmed the post.

Tavern of Fine Arts also took its final bow at the end of June. After five years, co-owner Mathew Davis said the DeBaliviere Place wine bar and performance space could not turn a profit. “The business operated and managed to support itself, so we were able to pay the bills, employees and artists,” he said. “(But) we could never get off that plateau of breaking even.” Tavern of Fine Arts closed Saturday, June 25.

 

Sneak Peek: Scapegoat in the Central West End

Friday, June 10th, 2016

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Trading breakfast for cocktails and light eats, Koplar Properties has opened Scapegoat Tavern & Courtyard at 52 Maryland Plaza. As The Scoop reported in April, the owners of sister restaurant Scape American Bistro closed former breakfast spot Crepes, Etc. and announced a new tavern concept for space.

The 40-seat space offers seven small-plate options executed by sous chef Eric Garcia, all priced under $15, as well as a large cocktail list of seven signature drinks and 20 classics. A rotating selection of Schlafly beer is poured from the four taps, and an additional selection of national and local bottles and cans of beer plus 15 wines by the glass round out the drinks.

Scapegoat is designed to be a casual, fun gathering place for diners to congregate after a dinner at neighboring Scape or as a standalone destination for folks who simply want to sip a drink and have a bite. Its interior is light and bright, and the courtyard in back provides space to hang out with friends or enjoy the weather.

Scapegoat will be open 4 p.m. until midnight Tuesday through Saturday with Sunday hours slated to be added at a later date. Here’s what to expect when you visit the newest member of the Scape family:

 

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Editor’s note: This post was updated at 8:30 a.m. June 12 with updated information about Scapegoat’s opening.

-photos by Michelle Volansky

Sneak Peek: Scarlett’s Wine Bar in the Central West End

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

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The newest member of the Sasha’s Wine Bar family will open to the public today, Thursday, June 2, when Scarlett’s Wine Bar opens its doors for service at 4253 Laclede Ave., in the Central West End. Like any sibling, Scarlett’s has the same DNA as her sister locations, but is her own, distinct restaurant.

The large, front patio – a la Sasha’s on Shaw – has room for roughly 30 guests to wine and dine al fresco under large umbrellas, while the inside features ample seating and plans for a back patio are in the works. Owners Rachel Jones and Alan Richman sourced vintage, art deco light fixtures and early 20th-century bar rails from Prince Edward Island that serve as a wine glass rack above the white marble bar.

While the dark walls and polished stone table tops are signature Sasha’s, Scarlett’s Wine Bar’s food menu boasts wood-fired pizzas, an option unique among the sister locations. Along with Neapolitan-style pizzas, Scarlett’s offers hummus plates, cheese and charcuterie, burgers, crab cakes and a vegetarian lasagna.

There are a handful of cocktails on the menu, including the Bey’s Knees, a nod to Beyonce. The mostly bottled beer selection is a lineup of craft beer bar man Tim McAndrews chose as “the best representation of the style.” The draft selection adheres to the same philosophy and features The Civil Life Brewing Co.’s American Brown and Perennial Artisan Ales’ Hopfentea.

The wine is the focus at Scarlett’s, and upon opening will offer 20 reds and 20 whites by the glass and will eventually have up to 175 bottles available for purchase. Scarlett’s Wine Bar will be open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. and from 10 a.m. to midnight on Sunday. Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect when you step inside:

 

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky 

 

The Scoop: Herbie’s Vintage ’72 to move to Clayton, Cardwell’s in Clayton to close

Monday, May 16th, 2016

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{The Grand Plateau at Herbie’s Vintage ’72} 

 

The Clayton dining scene gains a new neighbor in October when Herbie’s Vintage ’72 pulls up stakes in the Central West End and replants them in Clayton. As reported by St. Louis Magazine, the 8-year old French-American restaurant will serve its last crepe in the CWE on Oct. 2, move to 8100 Maryland Ave., and reopen at the beginning of November. Herbie’s Vintage 72 will take over Cardwell’s in Clayton, which will close on Oct. 1 as owners Rich and Debbie Gorczyca retire.

“I know the Rich and Debbie and originally looked at Cardwell’s when I first wanted to open Herbie’s,” said chef-owner Aaron Teitelbaum. “The location is right, the patio and the building matches up to who Herbie’s is.”

Rich Gorczyca agreed. “We’ve had a good, long run and Herbie’s is going to be a great fit,” he said. “The arrangement is good for all of us and what really swayed me is that (Teitelbaum) is going to offer every one of my current employees a position.”

In addition to familiar faces, Herbie’s current historic feel with French decor will remain the same at the new location, but customers will be able to enjoy new features, including three additional private rooms, a 100-seat patio and lunch service.

“We’re excited to be in Clayton where there’s such a great lunch clientele,” Teitelbaum said. “Clayton has a lot going on, and Herbie’s clients know our team to be professional and accommodating.”

Teitelbaum said he looks forward to bringing that accommodating environment and eclectic menu, including seafood, steaks and burgers, to the Clayton dining scene.

“For us, we’re driven by a team mentality,” he said. “We have a chef that will cook without ego. He has a menu and specials, but it’s more important that we are accommodating to if a guest wants something, we say, ‘Yes.’ If we don’t have it, we’ll run out and get it.”

Don’t look for the Gorczycas to ride off into the sunset. The couple plans to travel and Rich hopes to pursue volunteer opportunities with St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the Humane Society. “We want to thank all of our friends and patrons and business associations who have supported us for almost 30 years,” Gorczyca said.

 

-photo by Carmen Troesser

 

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