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Oct 24, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘egg’

Trendwatch: 7 trends on the plate, in the glass and atop our wish list now

Friday, January 13th, 2017

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1. Smash and Grab
St. Louisans don’t have to wait until Shake Shack opens later this year to get their griddle burger fix of thin patties smashed on a flattop. Get a taste at Reeds American Table, where two patties are smothered with Swiss cheese and tallow aioli, or head to Olive & Oak in Webster Groves, where the kitchen keeps it classic with American cheese and dill pickles. The smashed Farmhouse Burger has been a fixture at Retreat Gastropub since it opened in October 2015, and The Dam in Tower Grove South does smashed patties – though the burgers are stacked so high with fixins, it’s hard to tell. Find griddled burgers at Brasserie, Local Chef Kitchen and Baileys’ Range, too.

2. Drinking like a Vegan
Aquafaba, aka the cloudy liquid in a can of chickpeas that usually goes down the drain, has seen new life as a vegan egg replacer in baked goods. Now it’s found its way behind the bar and into Pisco Sours at Los Angeles establishments like Birch and Gracias Madre. Small Batch pulled a similar move in its Cicer Sour with aquafaba, smoked almond Pisco and dry curacao. Bengelina Hospitality bar manager Drew Lucido shakes it with Old Tom Gin, Becherovka and lemon juice in The Walden at Olio, while the team across the street at Nixta uses a cream whipper to add a foamy, egg-free head to the No. 3.

3. Kung Pao That
The Chinese staple is popping up outside the takeout box these days at restaurants like Mission Chinese in San Francisco, which has a kung pao pastrami we hope someone in town will replicate. Chefs at Cleveland-Heath were inspired by a celery dish at Mission’s NYC location to create a shaved raw beef and celery kung pao special for St. Louisans to enjoy last summer. The Preston swaps in calamari for a sophisticated take on the dish, and the pop-up and future restaurant Good Fortune is crazy about kung pao. It incorporated the flavors into a bratwurst made for a collaboration with Brasserie, and made a kung pao pizza for an event with Delicious Pizza in Los Angeles.

 

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4. Rise and Shine
The Egg McMuffin will always hold a special greasy place in our hearts, but area restaurants are taking breakfast more seriously these days. Whole concepts, like Egg on Gravois Avenue and Yolklore in Crestwood, are devoted to breakfast beyond the standard flapjacks, eggs and bacon. Quick counter-service options at newly opened eateries like Sardella and The Garden on Grand mean we’re setting our weekday alarms a few minutes earlier. Even pop-up eateries are getting in on the action: Revel Kitchen chef-owner Simon Lusky and chef Adam Altnether recently hosted the breakfast-themed Waffle Nut Pop-up, serving sweet and savory waffle combos and cereal milk coffee beverages.

5. Lightning in a Mug
Loaded with antioxidants, vitamins and a large dose of caffeine, yerba mate is a light, herbaceous tea that’s creeping its way into local spots like SweetArt, where it’s served hot, and Comet Coffee, where it’s found in two forms: as hot tea and as a mocha-nut mate made with toasted mate leaves, chocolate, hazelnut and marigold flowers for a sweet treat. Pick up some of the loose-leaf tea to brew at home from international grocers like Global Foods Market or United Provisions.

6. Meat Lollipops
Some St. Louis chefs are frenching chicken drumettes, trimming classic wings into little meat lollipops. The trend has a confusing extra-work-for-less-meat quality, but we’ve bought jeans with holes in the knees, so we’re not here to judge. Try the lollies at Mona’s, where they’re smoked and served with a creamy giardiniera sauce and salsa verde, or at Copper Pig with a Vietnamese fish sauce caramel or a sweet chile basil sauce. Scapegoat offers a more traditional Buffalo version.

7. Taste the Magic
Magic Shell is making appearances outside grandma’s sundae bar these days. We noticed it with caramelized honey and honeycomb candy on soft serve at The Honey Paw in Portland, Maine, and over caramel corn and vanilla malted milk balls at Girl & the Goat in Chicago. But Peacemaker Lobster & Crab Co. has offered the topping on soft serve since it opened in 2014, and our favorite matcha-chocolate cookie gelato pop from Porano this summer was dipped in Magic Shell. Taste’s new brownie dessert with candy cap ice cream and toffee sauce lives in a Magic Shell house, too.

 

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Best New Restaurants: No. 9 – Egg

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

To be the best, everything matters – atmosphere, service and food. Here, the places that dazzled us from the moment they opened: St. Louis’ 10 Best New Restaurants of 2016.

 

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{ cornbread benedict }

Egg, the former weekend brunch pop-up at Spare No Rib, hatched into its own restaurant this October, and we couldn’t be happier.

Certain combinations may sound odd, but don’t let that stop you from ordering chakchouka alongside a cheesy carne asada wrap or a chorizo breakfast taco with the cornbread and gravy.

The eclectic, Tex-Mex-leaning menu is a reflection of chef-owner Lassaad Jeliti’s background, from growing up in Tunisia to running a barbecue/taco joint for the past three years. The chakchouka, a hearty tomato and pepper stew topped with creamy soft-baked eggs and served with toast for dipping, was a childhood breakfast favorite. The Benedicts begin with the sweet, crumbly cornbread Jeliti perfected at Spare No Rib, topped with sauteed veggies or house-smoked pork belly and poached eggs, all drenched in hollandaise.

“They all have similar flavor profiles,” Jeliti said of his influences. “The Mexicans got their flavors from the Spaniards, who got their flavors from [North Africans],” he joked. “That’s my theory, anyway.”

Whatever its heritage, Egg’s flawlessly prepared, wide-ranging fare keeps us coming back for brunch.

 

More about Egg

• First Look: Egg in Benton Park

• The Scoop: Spare No Rib to move to larger space, expand Egg

Photo by Cory Miller

Hit List: 3 new restaurants you must try this November

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

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1. Egg: 2200 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, 314.202.8224, breakfastcamefirst.com

Egg has expanded from its weekend brunch popup beginnings, taking over Spare No Rib’s original space on Gravois Avenue for good. (Have no fear; Spare No Rib moved to a new home at 3701 S. Jefferson Ave.) Try the cornbread Benedict with a choice of smoked pork belly or spinach and avocado stacked on sweet, crumbly cornbread, topped with two gently poached eggs and a deluge of hollandaise or the generous asada wrap, packed with succulent steak, fries and just the right amount of cheese sauce. The chakchouka, a stewed vegetable dish with baked eggs, is a hearty yet healthy choice, or go south of the border with robust breakfast tacos filled with veggies, carne asada, chorizo or carnitas with house-made salsas. Sip a brunch cocktail like the sweet and floral Sidi Bou Spritz made with hop vodka, jasmine and elderflower liqueurs and fresh orange juice.

 

2. Vietnam Style: 6100 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis, 314.405.8438, Facebook: Vietnam Style

Vietnam Style on the east end of The Loop may confuse at first glance, but you’ll only be disappointed if you intend to shop for clothes. Start with the Vietnamese spring rolls, packed with veggies, rice noodles, pork and shrimp or grilled beef – and don’t be shy with the bright, savory peanut dipping sauce. The Bò Né Original Vietnamese Sizzling Steak is a great introduction to Vietnamese flavors, with a sweet and garlicky seasoning that complements rather than overpowers the filet mignon, along with a sunny side up egg. If you only get one thing, make it a noodle soup – the Pho Filet Mignon Bo Vien features thin, curling slices of tender beef, meatballs and rice noodles in a rich, mile-deep beef broth. The classic pho ga comes with generous amounts of shredded chicken and rice noodles in a lighter-tasting broth good enough to pour into a thermos and drink all day long.

 

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3. Wicked Greenz: 16 N. Central Ave., Clayton, 314.727.2772, wickedgreenz.com

Wicked Greenz is serving up healthy, quick meals for the lunch and dinner crowds in Clayton. The veggie-focused menu offers 13 greens-based dishes that can be served “bowled” as a salad or “rolled” as a wrap. Try the Mexicali, a mix of salad greens, black beans, red onion, corn, cilantro and pico de gallo with charred tomato vinaigrette. The classic Caesar features Asiago cheese, basil and a sharp Parmesan-peppercorn Caesar dressing. But the stars of the menu are the soups: The smoked chicken gumbo is spicy and complex with chunks of chicken, andouille and kielbasa in a dark, rich broth served atop a mound of white rice. Get the garlicky, slightly sweet tomato soup, which is topped with cheese and crunchy croutons reminiscent of a deconstructed grilled cheese.

 

-photos by Michelle Volansky 

 

 

 

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

Sunday, October 9th, 2016

From a Benton Park staple moving down the street to a Clayton institution closing doors after 16 years, here’s what went down last week in the STL food scene, in case you missed it.

 

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1. After nearly 10 years at 1900 Arsenal St., Benton Park Cafe is moving – but not too far. Owner Jessica Lenzen is relocating the restaurant to 2901 Salena St. (the former home of Jax Cafe) at the end of October.

2. After 16 years, owner Josh Allen is closing doors at Companion‘s Clayton cafe on Oct. 30. The cafe in Ladue and baking campus in Maryland Heights will both remain open.

 

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3. Pay no attention to the Spare No Rib signs at 2200 Gravois Ave.; Egg is now open for weekday breakfast and lunch in the barbecue joint’s original location.

4. Got $10 and a friend? Then contributor Holly Fann has eight delicious deals you need to devour this month on Budget Crunch.

 

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5. Combine the brewing prowess of a Ste. Genevieve staple with the skill and experience of a downtown restaurant powerhouse, and you have Charleville Brewing Co. and Restaurant. The owners of the Ste. Genevieve brewery have joined forces with Paul and Wendy Hamilton of Hamilton Hospitality to open the new concept at 2101 Chouteau Ave., in early 2017.

6. The Cup will close its Chesterfield location at 1590 Clarkson Road at the end of business on Saturday, Dec. 24, to focus on expanding delivery services and distribution.

 

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7. Most St. Louisans won’t be lucky enough to grab a seat at Washington University, but we can post up at these fine establishments with a cold cocktail or beer, watch the debate and engage in some lively – and hopefully civil – discourse.

8. Laurie and Eric Moore are bringing East Coast sweets to Maplewood. Boardwalk Waffles & Ice Cream is expected to open in the former I Scream Cakes location at 7326B Manchester Road on Nov. 1.

 

First Look: Egg in Benton Park

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

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Pay no attention to the Spare No Rib signs at 2200 Gravois Ave.; Egg is now open for weekday breakfast and lunch in the barbecue joint’s original location. As reported by The Scoop in July, Egg is an expansion of the brunch popup by the same name. Spare No Rib has opened with the same menu in its new location at 3701 S. Jefferson Ave. (formerly the home of Lucky Buddha). Owner Lassaad Jeliti quietly transitioned the two concepts in recent weeks.

Few changes were made to the interior of the 60-seat Benton Park restaurant, but the menu has expanded from its popup days and lost most of its barbecue flair. It got rid of the pulled pork, added brioche French toast and took on a unique lunch menu that strays far from its barbecue roots with dishes inspired by Jeliti’s Tunisian heritage.

Aside from the Tunisian salad made with tomato, onion, cucumber, jalapenos and apples in a lemon vinaigrette, there is a salad nicoise on the lunch menu. “Nicoise is a big salad in Tunisia,” Jeliti said. There is also chakchouka, a stewed tomato and vegetable dish served with baked eggs. “Growing up that was the breakfast thing,” he said.

The bar dominating the space serves a short menu of brunch cocktails along with espresso drinks and freshly squeezed orange and grapefruit juices. A classic mimosa and bloody mary are available, as well as more creative sippers like the Sidi Bou Spritz made with hop vodka, jasmine and elderflower liqueurs and fresh orange juice.

Egg is open Tuesday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Click below for a first look at what’s for breakfast on Gravois:

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky

 

Extra Sauce: In case you missed it…

Sunday, July 17th, 2016

From new projects from the owners of Sugarfire Smoke House and The Wheelhouse to closings of Benton Park brunch favorites, here’s what went down last week, in case you missed it.

 

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1. Get ready to brunch (and barbecue) hard, St. Louis. Spare No Rib is set to move to a new location in South City in mid-August, while its brunch concept Egg takes over the original Spare No Rib space at 2200 Gravois Ave., in Benton Park.

2. PerJax Americana Kitchen has come and gone in University City, closing just two months after opening.

 

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3. Husband-and-wife duo Kevin and Britt Pellegrino, both formerly of Five Bistro and Olive & Oak, are starting their own catering company, BK Catering.

4. Jax Café has closed doors for good. The Benton Park restaurant served its last meal Sunday, July 10.

 

5. Start Bar, downtown St. Louis’ new arcade bar opened Wednesday, July 13 at 1000 Spruce St. The colorful, game-themed space was designed with an eye for detail, from the old school Nintendo console wall art to the narrow tables hidden between game cabinets for drink storage while you play.

6. Absolute BBQ Indian Wish Grill, Chesterfield’s new Indian fusion joint, started serving up lunch and dinner on June 23 at 17409 Chesterfield Airport Road.

 

 

7. The owners of Sugarfire Smoke House are opening another restaurant – but barbecue isn’t on the menu. The Hi-Pointe Drive In will serve griddled burgers on potato buns, fries and shakes in a new space at 1033 McCausland Ave., after tearing down the former Del Taco building at that address.

 

The Scoop: Spare No Rib to move to larger space, expand Egg

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

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Get ready to brunch (and barbecue) hard, St. Louis. Spare No Rib is set to move to a new location in South City in mid-August, while its brunch concept Egg takes over the original Spare No Rib space at 2200 Gravois Ave., in Benton Park.

Since owner Lassaad Jeliti hatched the idea for a Sunday brunch pop-up at Spare No Rib in fall 2014, he said intended to expand the two concepts. “We could have done breakfast under Spare No Rib, but I gave (Egg) a different name to have an opportunity to split them apart,” Jeliti said.

The new location for Spare No Rib had to be near its current customer base in Benton Park, Tower Grove, Lafayette Square and Soulard. Jeliti found his opportunity in a freestanding building at 3701 S. Jefferson Ave., previously occupied by Lucky Buddha.

The Jefferson Avenue location will raise Spare No Rib’s capacity to about 60 seats and add outdoor seating from two patio spaces. The menu won’t change initially, but Jeliti is open to extending the hours and adjusting the menu at some point. “I’m going to let the space tell me what to do with it,” he said.

Egg and Spare No Rib are expected to open as separate restaurants next month. Spare No Rib will maintain its regular hours from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the new location.

Egg will serve its usual brunch menu on weekends from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., and will shift to quick breakfasts and lunch items Tuesday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

By the Book: Michael Ruhlman’s Poached-in-a-Bag Egg Sandwich with Caramelized Onion and Roasted Red Pepper

Saturday, October 18th, 2014

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I love eggs. In my opinion, few things can’t be improved with the addition of a golden runny yolk, no matter how tired the trend may be. It’s my go-to protein for breakfast (and often for dinner, too), yet Michael Ruhlman’s love for eggs makes mine look like pure indifference. In fact, the prolific culinary writer (who will visit St. Louis for a Celebrity Chef Series dinner Nov. 20) penned a cookbook entirely dedicated to this essential ingredient: Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient.

Enter the egg flowchart. To better document all the ways an egg could be used, Ruhlman created a massive diagram that breaks down its seemingly infinite preparations. Is it cooked whole or separated? In the shell or out? Are you making a batter or a dough? Whipping a meringue or binding meatballs? The flowchart is so large, it can’t even fit on a two-page spread of Egg. Instead, it comes as a 5-foot poster folded neatly in the back of the book. It’s so comprehensive (and beautiful), I wanted to frame and hang it in my kitchen for inspiration. With all the options presented in this book – from seafood roulade to marshmallows to an ale and rum flip – I chose one of my favorite egg presentations: a poached egg sandwich.

I know, egg sandwiches are not exactly earth-shattering. After all, nearly every fast-food joint around has some form of egg-sausage-cheese combo for breakfast. But few recipes highlight the natural flavor of an egg better than breakfast dishes, and the technique Ruhlman used to poach the eggs intrigued me.

 

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Perhaps 25 percent of my poaching attempts succeed. Somehow, I manage to keep the whites tight, not puncture the yolk and transfer it to a plate with a semi-cooked center. Then, my next egg fails miserably. Ruhlman covers the traditional poaching technique, but he also shared a second, far simpler, method. Just pop the egg in a zip-close bag and let it poach without actually touching the simmering water. Though I’d heard of this method before, temperature and times varied wildly and I’d never actually attempted it. But if anyone could help me get it right, it’s Michael Ruhlman.

 

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The process is simple enough. While the water comes to boil, add a few drops of olive oil to a sandwich-sized zip-top bag and smush the plastic to spread it around, making sure to get the oil into the corners. Then, crack the egg into a small bowl and gently slide it into the bag, working it into a corner so it looks like a mini pastry bag. Twist it closed and seal with a zip-tie (or if you happen to cook at the Sauce office, a paper clip). Plop the eggs into the simmering water, set your timer for 4 minutes and be patient. I found that occasionally turning the bags to rotate the eggs helped them poach more evenly.

 

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When the timer rang, the eggs slipped out of the plastic and came to rest gently on top of my English muffin. Granted, they weren’t as pretty as you’d find at brunch around town – the whites were a hilarious conical shape, like my sandwich wore a hat. Still, I’ll take perfectly cooked (if awkwardly shaped) over my pot of over-boiled egg whites any day. Bring on the Benedicts!

 

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As for the rest of the sandwich, it’s a classic but perfect combination. Always use an English muffin over toast (“… the holey crumb helps catches the yolk when you bite into it,” Ruhlman said) and add a splash of white wine vinegar to make the caramelized onions and peppers sing. Forget the sausage, cheese and bacon. When you have a perfectly oozing golden yolk and sweet caramelized onions and peppers, you don’t need anything else.

 

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Poached-in-a-Bag Egg Sandwich with Caramelized Onion and Roasted Red Pepper
4 servings

4 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil
4 eggs
1 tsp. butter, plus more for the English muffins
½ onion, thinly sliced
1 red bell pepper, charred black over a glam or under a broiler, then peeled and diced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ tsp. red or white wine vinegar
4 English muffins

• If you wish to cook your eggs ahead of time, bring a medium pot of water to a simmer over high heat, then reduce the heat so that water is gently simmering; prepare an ice bath (half ice, half water). Put 1 teaspoon olive oil into each of 4 small plastic bags, then crack an egg into each bag. Twist each bag closed and secure it with a twist-tie. Lower the bags into the simmering water and cook 4 minutes. Transfer the bags to the ice bath and put the whole thing in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve. At that point, return the bags to simmering water for 90 seconds to reheat before serving.
• When you’re ready to prepare the sandwiches, heat the butter over medium heat and saute the onion gently till nicely browned and caramelized, 15 to 20 minutes. Add the red bell pepper to reheat, season to taste with salt and pepper, and then add the vinegar.
• Toast and butter the English muffins.
• If you haven’t made the eggs ahead of time, cook them now as described above. Divide the onion-pepper mixture among the four muffin bottoms. Place a cooked egg on each – they will slip easily out of their oiled bags. Season the eggs with salt and pepper and top with the muffin tops. Serve immediately.

Reprinted with permission from Little Brown and Company

What’s your favorite way to use an egg and why? Whole and fried? Separated and baked or whipped into a meringue? Scrambled into an omelet? Tell us in the comment section below for a chance to win a copy of Egg.

Eat This: Niche’s Lemon-Maple Custard

Monday, March 17th, 2014

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The signature Lemon-Maple Custard at Niche is what happens when chef-owner Gerard Craft takes liberties with chawan mushi, a savory Japanese custard. Presented in a Double Star Farms eggshell with the top cut off, bonito caviar garnishes a nest of roasted shiitake mushrooms. Hidden underneath these earthy, salty layers is a silky, citrusy custard with a sweet touch of local maple syrup. Don’t worry if this divine starter has you scraping the sides of the shell with your little spoon. Everybody does it.

-photo by Greg Rannells

Meatless Monday: The Block’s Open-Faced Farm Egg Sandwich

Monday, October 14th, 2013

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On The Block Restaurant’s menu, bacon is ubiquitous. However, if you’re going meatless the Open-Faced Farm Egg sandwich at the butcher and bar’s Central West End location is for you. For just $9, this knife-and-fork sandwich is stacked with melting cheddar cheese, dressed greens and a fried local egg with quivering yolk. (A miniature mountain of garlicky fries on the side is a good distraction after your sandwich is gone, too.)

 

 

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