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Posts Tagged ‘gluten’

First Look: New Day Gluten Free in Clayton

Friday, January 27th, 2017

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New Day Gluten Free has a new home in Clayton. After closing their Ellisville location three months ago, co-owners Garrett and Kelly Beck have reopened their gluten-free, peanut-free restaurant and bakery at 7807 Clayton Road on Monday, Jan. 16.

Kelly Beck said the kitchen is twice as big as the Ellisville location, which makes it possible to hire more staff and expand its offerings. The menu is currently the same as the Ellisville location, though with the addition of a deep-fryer, Beck has added house-made chips and is developing recipes for gluten-free doughnuts.

The 3,800-square-foot space seats 40 inside and will seat an additional 25 when the weather warms. “It’s almost triple the seating we had in Ellisville,” Beck said. “We learned a lot at the other space, but [the new space] is what I always envisioned when we first started talking about opening a gluten-free cafe.”

New Day Gluten Free is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here’s what you’ll find when you visit the new space:

 

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Photos by Michelle Volansky

Related Content
Wheatless Wednesdays: Gluten-free recipes

The Scoop: New Day Gluten Free closes doors, intends to open new location this year

• The Scoop: New Day Gluten Free to open Clayton cafe in December

The Scoop: New Day Gluten Free closes doors, intends to open new location this year

Monday, September 19th, 2016

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After nearly six years, New Day Gluten Free closed its doors in Ellisville today, Sept. 19 – but owners Garrett and Kelly Beck aren’t ruling out a new home for the gluten-free, peanut-free restaurant and bakery.

After dealing with staffing issues and low sales at the West County location, Kelly Beck said the couple decided to close the restaurant (which was announced on Facebook) to focus full-time on finding the right spot for New Day Gluten Free. “It came down to a location and timing thing,” she said. “With our lease up in six months, we decided to close down this location to focus 100 percent on the next location.”

The Becks hope to move to a more central, accessible location to better serve its customers, many of whom traveled long distances to one of the only dedicated gluten-free restaurants in the St. Louis region. Beck said they haven’t yet decided where New Day’s new home will be, but they aim to be open by Thanksgiving, one of their busiest times of year. “The need is there, so we are going to continue,” Beck said. “This is just a pause.”

Until then, customers can stock their freezers with gluten-free goodies to hold them over during the interim this Saturday, Sept. 24, when New Day will reopen from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for retail orders only. Details will be available on its Facebook page.

Baked: Pistachio Raspberry Muffins

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

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I was devastated when my doctor recently informed me that I must switch to a gluten-free diet, likely for the rest of my life. While I no longer partake of flour-based goodies (I do still bake them for my job and for friends.), I’m learning to adapt and develop naturally gluten-free treats that don’t use highly processed gluten-free flour blends.

I was craving one of my pistachio raspberry muffins, so I swapped the traditional all-purpose flour for nut flours instead. Finely ground almonds can do wonders as a replacement for AP flour, and rice flour just adds a bit more texture. Finally, pistachios and raspberries balance each other with tartness and nuttiness. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Gluten-free Pistachio Raspberry Muffins
Adapted from a recipe in The Afternoon Tea Collection by Pamela Clark
1 dozen

4 oz. (½ stick) butter, softened
¾ cup granulated sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
4 eggs
2 cups almond flour*
½ cup pistachio flour*
½ cup rice flour
1 tsp. baking soda
Pinch of kosher salt
1 cup raspberries
2 Tbsp. coarse sugar

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners.
• In a large mixing bowl, use an electric hand mixer on high speed, beat the butter and granulated sugar together until soft and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Reduce the speed to medium-low and add the vanilla and the eggs 1 at a time until combined.
• And the almond flour, pistachio flour, rice flour, baking soda and salt. Use a spatula to combine, than gently fold almost all the raspberries, reserving a few to top the muffins.
• Evenly divide the batter among the muffin cups. Top each with the remaining raspberries and sprinkle with the coarse sugar.
• Bake 20 to 25 minutes, until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out with a few crumbs attached. Let cool completely before eating.

*Almond flour and pistachio flour are available at Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods.

First Look: A2 The GFCF Cafe & Restaurant in downtown St. Louis

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

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Audra Angelique and Audrey Faulstich are on a mission to provide downtown St. Louis healthy alternatives for those with food allergies and intolerances. Their experiences with specialty diets inspired them to launch A2 The GFCF Cafe and Restaurant, which opened doors on April 11 at 1330 Washington Ave.

As The Scoop reported in September 2015, co-owners Angelique, who serves as head chef, and Faulstich, a registered nurse, wanted to provide healthy food and to educate others about the potential health benefits of removing foods containing gluten and casein (a protein found in mammal milk).

At first glance, the 35-seat dining room feels like a coffee shop, complete with an espresso bar and bakery case, but the restaurant has a gluten-free lunch and dinner menu featuring sandwiches, salads and pizzas with casein-free options.

A2 worked with Wildwood-based Think.Eat.Live. to develop a variety of breads and the pizza crust made with the company’s sunflower seed-based flour blend. They also brew Mississippi Mud coffee and offer tea from London Tea Room. A2 also strives to use recyclable and compostable carryout boxes, utensils, cups and straws.

A2 is open Tuesdays though Sundays from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. with plans to add a weekend brunch service. Here’s a first look at what to expect at downtown’s newest eatery.

 

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-photos by Michelle Volansky 

 

The Scoop: Gluten-free, casein-free restaurant to open downtown

Friday, September 11th, 2015

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A2 The GFCF Cafe & Restaurant is bringing gluten- and casein-free fare to downtown at 1330 Washington Ave.

The restaurant is named for co-owners Audrey Faulstich and Audra Angelique. Faulstich, a registered nurse, eschewed foods containing gluten and casein (a protein found in mammal milk) in early 2014. After noticing the positive health benefits it had for her friend, Angelique also began following a gluten- and casein-free lifestyle. Angelique experimented with recipes in her home kitchen before deciding to take her health-focused dishes to the masses with a new restaurant downtown.

Starting in early November, A2 will be open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and a weekend brunch. The menu will feature gluten- and dairy-free pizzas and sandwiches served on freshly baked, gluten-free bread. The St. Louis Club will feature turkey, avocado aioli and fresh tomatoes on gluten-free, casein-free cheddar-bacon focaccia. Look also for creative takes on pasta salads, including a pad Thai salad with glass noodles and “spaghetti and meatball salad” using quinoa-brown rice noodles tossed in a sun-dried tomato dressing.

On the beverage side, A2 will offer a full espresso bar, as well as healthy, house-made soft drinks like the Audrey Temple with sparkling black cherry juice, cherry-infused water, black cherry-chia seed probiotics and honey-soaked cherries. They will also install an oxygen bar.

Angelique said she hopes to support as many local purveyors as possible. They plan to use produce from the Urban Harvest rooftop garden, coffee from Mississippi Mud and gluten-free sunflower-based flour from Think.Eat.Live. “I’m obsessed with St. Louis,” Angelique said. “I think it’s one of the best cities in the country, possibly the world.”

 

 

 

 

 

By the Book: Erin McKenna’s Carrot Bread

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

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As fellow gluten-free and dairy-free diners can attest, eating with dietary restrictions is easier said than done. At restaurants, we must ignore our friends’ barely-concealed cringes as we deconstruct an entree to conform to our needs. At home, we spend hours scouring niche food blogs for our next meal. Perhaps the biggest test of my willpower, though, is when an unknowing waiter places an overflowing bread basket in front of me. After years of coveting that basket of forbidden gluten, I was thrilled when my editor Catherine Klene dropped a copy of Bread & Butter: Gluten-Free Vegan Recipes to Fill Your Bread Basket by my desk.

Sauce interns get to try a lot of food on the job, and my editors always search for something I can eat among the loot, usually only to be foiled — a slice of cake might be gluten-free, but not dairy-free, or vice versa. That’s why McKenna’s book, featuring indulgent recipes that are gluten-free and vegan, seemed the perfect end to a semester-long quest for “something Tori can eat.”

McKenna, who also passed on the bread basket for two decades due to a gluten sensitivity, now runs BabyCakes, a gluten-free vegan bakery with locations in New York City, Los Angeles and Orlando. Based on recipes pioneered in her bakery, her new cookbook begins with a break down of basic ingredients and baking tips invaluable to those new to specialty baking. From there, her book is broken up into chapters by category: morning treats, breads (of course), sandwiches, pizza and focaccia, kids’ recipes, international cuisine, puff pastries and tarts, snacks, dips and dressings (including vegan butter!), and desserts. While the pain au chocolate looked tempting, I chose the carrot bread because it looked both doable and delicious.

 

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McKenna’s recipes are straightforward and concise throughout, usually taking no more than a page of text punctuated with beautiful photos and colorful design. Her carrot bread calls for walnut oil or coconut oil, vegan sugar, gluten-free baking flour (we used Cup 4 Cup), arrowroot, xanthan gum, shredded carrots and optional chopped walnuts. Gluten-free home cooks already have most of these items in our kitchen pantries.

As an amateur baker, I found McKenna’s instructions easy to follow. The only painstaking part of the baking process was shredding all those carrots. Next time, I’ll do this the night before or use the shredder attachment on a food processor. Also be aware that this recipe takes some time – as a yeast bread, the dough needs an hour to rise, and then requires another 35 minutes in the oven. Keep a good book on hand or start trolling the Internet for more niche foodie blogs.

Despite these few bumps, I found the finished product to be well worth the wait. For someone who hasn’t eaten bread, much less homemade bread, in quite some time, McKenna’s carrot bread truly was a treat. I found the bread to be spongy and light, with a slight texture and crunch from the walnuts. Though the book claims that even non gluten-free and vegan people will love this recipe, my Sauce coworkers claim they could tell the difference. Still, for those gluten-free and vegan among us, this carrot bread is a real indulgence.

 

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Carrot Bread
Makes 1 7-by-4-by-3-inch loaf

3 Tbsp. walnut oil or melted unscented coconut oil, plus more for the pan
1½ cups warm water (about 100 degrees)
4 Tbsp. vegan sugar
2¼ tsp. active dry yeast
2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free All-Purpose Baking Flour
2 Tbsp. arrowroot
½ tsp. xanthan gum
1 tsp. baking powder
2 tsp. ground cinnamon
¼ tsp. ground nutmeg
1½ tsp. salt
2 cups firmly packed shredded carrots
¾ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

• Lightly grease a 7-by-4-by-3-inch loaf pan with oil.
• In a small bowl, combine the oil, warm water, sugar and yeast. Stir once and set aside to proof until it bubbles, about 10 minutes.
• In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, arrowroot, xanthan gum, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Pour in the yeast mixture and, using a rubber spatula, stir until it is the consistency of cake batter. If the dough is too thick, add additional warm water one splash at a time. Fold in the carrots and the walnuts (if using). Pour the dough into the prepared loaf pan, cover with a dish towel, and let the dough rise for 1 hour.
• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
• Bake the bread for 20 minutes, and then rotate the pan 180 degrees. Bake until the crust is golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 15 minutes.
• Let the bread cool in the pan for 1 hour before slicing.

Reprinted with permission from Clarkson Potter

What’s the most creative recipe you’ve used to accommodate someone’s dietary restrictions? Tell us in the comments below for a chance to win a copy of Erin McKenna’s Bread & Butter.

By the Book: Alice Medrich’s Ricotta Cheesecake with Chestnut Crust

Saturday, January 24th, 2015

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Alice Medrich’s new book Flavor Flours poses an intriguing question: What if wheat flour didn’t exist? Though I’ve used almond flour for baking (and engaged in a brief foray with spelt), I haven’t delved deeply into non-wheat flours before. Still, I’ve had success with Medrich’s recipes in the past, and so I thought if anyone could walk me through the technicalities of coconut flour, rice flours and others, she could.

The book is divided into eight chapters discussing everything from oat flour to buckwheat and teff. I selected a stunning-looking ricotta cheesecake with a chestnut-flour crust. Of course, on the next page (after the beautiful photos) was this note: Patience Required. “I’ve never made a cheesecake that did not improve with at least a full 24 hours, if not 48 hours, of mellowing in the fridge before serving,” Medrich writes. This supposes the baker to possesses enough will power to not touch a cheesecake staring her in the face every time she opens the refrigerator. Patience should be called for up front, along with the springform cake pan, food processor and other special equipment.

 

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Tracking down the ingredients proved more difficult than the recipe itself. After several phone calls, my coworker wisely suggested trying DiGregorio’s Market on The Hill. After all, chestnut flour is often used in Italian desserts, she reminded me. Rice flour was an easier find; a bag of Bob’s Red Mill was quickly located at my neighborhood supermarket.

The dough for the crust comes together in a snap, though it looks much wetter than a typical tart dough. Molding it to the pan takes some work (sort of like spreading cold peanut butter), but keep at it and use a piece of plastic wrap and a water glass as Medrich suggests to get an even thickness.

 

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My patience was first tested during the parbake. My kitchen smelled like the fire-roasted chestnuts heralded in The Christmas Song, and I had to remember I was not allowed to eat the crust prior to pouring the thick, lemon-flecked ricotta filling. Back into the oven again, and then, against my better judgement, not into my mouth but into the refrigerator.

The final product was worth every agonizing minute. The buttery crust, nearly chocolate brown after two rounds in the oven, was deeply nutty and contrasted beautifully with the rich, savory ricotta studded with slivered almonds and pine nuts. Medrich’s brilliance came through for me once again, though I must confess: We only waited 24 hours, not her prescribed 48, before slicing. Everyone has their limits, after all.

 

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Alice Medrich’s Ricotta Cheesecake with Chestnut Crust
12 servings

For the crust:
1 cup plus 2 Tbsp. (115 g.) chestnut flour*
¼ cup (40 g.) white rice flour or 1/3 cup plus 1 Tbsp. (40 g.) Thai white rice flour
¼ cup plus 2 Tbsp. (75 g.) sugar
Scant ½ tsp. salt
9 Tbsp. (130 g.) unsalted butter, slightly softened and cut into chunks
3 Tbsp. (45 g.) cream cheese
1 egg yolk mixed with a pinch of salt and ½ tsp. water, for the egg wash

For the filling:
3 cups (665 g.) whole-milk ricotta cheese, at room temperature
¾ cup (150 g.) sugar
1 Tbsp. white rice flour
1½ tsp. pure vanilla extract
4 large eggs, at room temperature
2 Tbsp. chopped candied orange or lemon peel or golden raisins
2 Tbsp. slivered almonds, toasted
¼ cup (30 g.) pine nuts, toasted

Equipment:
Food processor fitted with the steel blade (optional)
9-by-3-inch springform pan or cheesecake pan with removable bottom
Baking sheet
Handheld mixer

• To make the crust by hand, put the chestnut flour, rice flour, sugar and salt in a large bowl and whisk until thoroughly blended. Add the butter chunks and cream cheese. Use a fork or the back of a large spoon to mash and mix the ingredients together until all are blended into a smooth, soft dough.
• To make the crust in a food processor, put the chestnut flour, rice flour, sugar, and salt in the food processor. Pulse to blend. Add the butter chunks and cream cheese. Pulse until the mixture forms a smooth, soft dough. Scrape the bowl and blend in any stray flour at the bottom of the bowl with your fingers.
• The dough may seem much softer than other tart doughs. Use the heel of your hand and then your fingers and/or a small offset spatula to spread the dough all over the bottom of the pan. Press it squarely into the corners of the pan with the side of your index finger to prevent extra thickness at the bottom edges, and press it as evenly as possible about halfway up the sides of the pan. Have patience; there is just enough dough (although you may not think so at first). If there is too much dough in one place (or hiding in the corners of the pan), pinch or scrape it off and move it elsewhere. Spread or smear it smooth with the spatula. Here’s a final trick for a perfectly even crust: Press a sheet of plastic wrap against the bottom and up the sides of the pan and lay a paper towel on top. Set a straight-sided flat-bottomed cup on the towel; press and slide the cup all over the bottom and around the sides to smooth and even the surface. Leave the plastic wrap in place. Refrigerate the pan for at least 2 hours, but preferably overnight and up to 3 days.
• Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 325 degrees.
• Peel off the plastic wrap and place the pan on the baking sheet. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, checking after 15 to 20 minutes. If the crust has puffed up on the bottom, press it back down carefully with the back of a fork. Continue baking until the crust is golden brown with darker edges. Remove the pan from the oven but leave the oven on. Brush the bottom and sides of the crust carefully with a thin coating of the egg wash. Return the pan to the oven for 2 minutes to set the egg wash. Set the pan on a rack to cool for at least 20 minutes or until you are ready to finish the cake. The crust can be wrapped and kept at room temperature for up to 2 days.
• Set the oven temperature to 375 degrees.
• To make the filling, beat the ricotta with the sugar, rice flour, and vanilla with the handheld mixer just until well blended. Beat in the eggs one by one, just until blended. Mix in the candied orange peel or raisins, the almonds, and pine nuts. Scrape the batter into the crust. Bake for 30 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 (degree symbol) F and bake for another 20 to 25 minutes, or until a knife inserted about 2 inches form the edge of the pan comes out clean. The center should still be jiggly. Let cool completely in the pan on a rack before unmolding. Cover and refrigerate for at least 24 hours (48 hours is even better) before serving. Leftovers keep, covered and refrigerated, for another few days.

*Chestnut flour is available at DiGregorio’s Market.

Reprinted with permission from Artisan Publishing

What’s your favorite non-wheat flour to work with and why? Tell us in the comments below for a chance to win a copy of Flavor Flours.

 

Wheatless Wednesday: Twisted Vegetable Lasagna

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

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Tomorrow begins a new year and the post-holiday food slump. We’re all tired of rich food, but we need filling meals to keep the belly warm as winter drags on. (Want more light, bright winter fare? Click here.) That’s why I turned a classic heavy dish into a lighter gluten-free meal with a twist. Instead of layering noodles into the lasagna pan, try wrapping them around the filling, creating portioned packets of lasagna resting on a veggie bed and swathed in gooey cheese. It’s perfect for last-minute New Year’s Eve gatherings or long winter nights that lie ahead.

Twisted Gluten-Free Vegetable Lasagna
15 to 16 servings

1 16-oz. box gluten-free lasagna noodles
3 Tbsp. olive oil, plus more to coat, divided
1 medium zucchini, thinly sliced lengthwise
1 yellow squash, thinly sliced lengthwise
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 tsp. dried herbs like basil, thyme or oregano, divided
1 small white onion, chopped
8 oz. button mushrooms, sliced
1 16-oz. jar pasta sauce
8 oz. cottage cheese, drained
8 oz. ricotta cheese
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 egg
1 tsp. garlic powder
5 oz. baby spinach leaves
8 oz. shredded sharp cheddar, divided
8 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese, divided

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Bring a large pot of salted water to boil with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Cook the lasagna noodles under just tender enough to roll easily, about 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and lightly coat each with more olive oil to keep from sticking, then lay them flat on an olive oil-coated baking sheet until ready to use.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for indirect heat or place a grill pan over medium-high heat.
• Toss the zucchini and yellow squash with olive oil to coat and season with 1 teaspoon herbs and salt and pepper to taste. Grill the zucchini and squash until tender and a bit charred, about 5 minutes, then flip and grill another 5 minutes. Remove and set aside.
• Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Saute the onion and mushrooms with the remaining 1 teaspoon herbs until lightly brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat.
• Roughly chop the grilled zucchini and yellow squash and toss with the mushrooms and onion. Set aside.
• Spoon a thin layer of pasta sauce on bottom of 13-by-9-inch glass baking dish, then cover with the chopped vegetables.
• In a medium bowl, stir together the cottage cheese, ricotta, Parmesan, egg and garlic powder until combined. Spread a thin layer of this mixture on top of each lasagna noodle, then sprinkle with a few tablespoons cheddar and mozzarella cheese and cover with a few spinach leaves.
• Roll each noodle into a tight pinwheel and place spiral-side-down on top of the vegetables, packing together tightly so they stay closed. Cover the noodles with the remaining sauce and remaining cheddar and mozzarella cheese. Place the pan on a baking sheet to catch any drippings and bake 35 minutes, until the sauce and cheese are bubbly and slightly brown. Cover with foil and bake another 10 minutes. Let rest 15 minutes before serving.

Wheatless Wednesday: Holiday Party Snack Mix

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

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The bowl of mixed nuts at holiday parties always intrigues me. I love the possibility of crunchy, chewy, savory and sweet, all in one bite – not to mention anything roasted in butter and sugar. But eating gluten-free means I usually keep my hands out of the snack bowl, fearful of hidden crackers or other glutinous ingredients.

My party snack mix relies on naturally gluten-free morsels that are rich in various textures: crunchy curried pecans, toasted coconut chips, dried cranberries … and chocolate-covered bacon. Have a batch on hand for upcoming holiday gatherings and make an extra one just for you.

 

Party Snack Mix
Makes 4 to 5 cups

2 Tbsp. butter
2 cups raw unsalted pecans
2 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 Tbsp. curry powder
¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
6 slices natural bacon, roughly chopped
4 oz. 70-80 percent chocolate
1 tsp. coarse sea salt
2.5 oz. chopped crystallized ginger
1 3.2-oz. bag toasted coconut chips*
1 cup pomegranate-infused dried cranberries or plain dried cranberries

• In a large skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the pecans and toast, stirring often, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the brown sugar and curry powder and continue stirring until the nuts are fragrant and lightly browned, another 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate, sprinkle with pepper and let cool.
• Wipe the skillet clean and return to the stove over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and fry until brown and crisp, about 8 to 10 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to cool.
• Meanwhile, prepare a double boiler by bringing a few inches of water to a simmer in a pot over medium heat. Place glass bowl over the bowl, add the chocolate and stir until completely melted.
• Remove from heat and add the bacon to the bowl, stirring to coat completely. Scrape the mixture onto a parchment-lined plate and spread into a single layer. Sprinkle with sea salt and refrigerate until hardened, about 20 minutes.
• Break the chocolate into bite-sized pieces and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the curried pecans, crystallized ginger, coconut chips and dried cranberries and toss to combine. The nut mix will keep, refrigerated, up to 2 weeks in an airtight container.

*I used Dang Original Toasted Coconut Chips, available at Dierbergs.

Wheatless Wednesday: Thumbprint Cookies

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

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In winter, I’m drawn to tactile recipes that let me slow down and bake nourishing, delicious treats. This thumbprint cookie lets me get my hands right into the dough, stamping my signature into each one. Plus, it’s the perfect way to clean out those almost-empty jam jars taking up space in the fridge.

This recipe allows for a lot of variation. Choose any combination of raw or roasted nuts to achieve your desired flavor. For example, raw cashews and almonds will be a touch sweeter than, say, walnuts. You can also use any gluten-free baking mix; I used Pamela’s Pancake & Baking Mix, which includes a bit of leavening, but isn’t required. Experiment with liquid sweeteners like maple syrup or agave syrup, too, to find the perfect balance of sweet and savory.

Gluten-free Thumbprint Cookies
Makes 3 dozen

1½ cup roasted cashews
½ cup raw almonds
4 cups gluten-free old-fashioned oats or gluten-free oat groats
¼ tsp. sea salt
1½ cups gluten-free baking mix, such as Pamela’s Pancake & Baking Mix
1 cup coconut oil, melted
2/3 cup honey
1/3 cup molasses
1 tsp. vanilla extract
¼ cup hemp seeds*
Assorted jams for filling

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper or Silpat mats.
• In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the cashews and almonds until coarsely ground and transfer to a large mixing bowl. Set aside.
• Pulse the oats and sea salt in the bowl of the food processor until coarsely ground, stopping before it becomes flour. Add the ground oats and the baking mix to the ground nuts and stir to combine. Add the coconut oil, honey, molasses and vanilla extract, mixing to thoroughly combine. Stir in the hemp seeds.
• Roll the dough into 1- to 2-inch balls and place them 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. If the dough feels too sticky, refrigerate 20 to 30 minutes.
• Indent the center of each cookie with your thumb, then fill each space with a bit of jam. Bake 15 to 17 minutes, until lightly browned.
• Let the cookies rest 10 minutes, then transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

*Hemp seeds are available at Whole Foods.

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