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Mar 28, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Posts Tagged ‘Ladue’

The Scoop: Caravelli signs on at Butchery, Andrew takes over as head butcher, McDonald departs for Byrd & Barrel

Wednesday, June 24th, 2015

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{Steven Caravelli}

 

Do the Truffles shuffle! A considerable role shift is underway at Truffles Butchery. The Ladue restaurant and meat market recently announced Steven Caravelli has assumed the executive chef-ship of Butchery in cooperation with Brandon Benack, executive chef of Truffles. Caravelli, who started at Butchery June 16, is most recently an alum of Cucina Pazzo; he also has helmed Tavern Kitchen, Pi, Gringo, Araka and Sleek.

“It’s kind of a new aspect right now. I’ve been calling myself a shopkeep,” Caravelli said. “I’ve got to know about wine, about all these prepared items we have in the case. I have to know about all the mustard and barbecue sauces we have. It’s almost like a grocery store. For me, it’s a very exciting … opportunity to learn.”

Caravelli said he hopes to expand Butchery’s catering and prepared foods program, particularly boxed lunches that will include house-prepared roast beef, ham and other deli meats. “I want to maintain the consistency and quality of the place,” he said. “We pride ourselves on catering to the neighborhood. We’re trying to figure out what the neighborhood wants and what the neighborhood eats and make more of that.”

 

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{Tommy Andrew}

 

While Caravelli will oversee much of the management duties both in the kitchen and in Butchery’s retail section, butcher Tommy Andrew – a member of this year’s Sauce’s Ones to Watch class – will fill the sous chef and head butcher positions. Caravelli and Andrew previously worked together at Gringo. “(Tommy’s) great at breaking down whole animals,” Caravelli said. “We work well together.”

While staying mostly mum on the details of his new role, Andrew said he is “definitely going to be stepping up a bit.” His promotion comes soon after the departure of Ryan McDonald, who left several weeks ago to be a chef at upcoming fried chicken eatery Byrd & Barrel, slated to open in July.

 

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{Ryan McDonald} 

 

“To be honest, I missed cooking,” McDonald explained. “Butchering was awesome, running the shop was a lot of fun … but my love is in cooking. Me and Bob (Brazell, co-owner of Byrd & Barrel) have been good friends for years and years now, so it seemed like the right move.”

He also mentioned McDonald’s expertise with charcuterie, which he hopes to add to the Byrd & Barrel menu. “Ryan and I have been really close friends since Monarch,” Brazell said. “I want someone that I trust and is going to care about it as much as I do. Ryan’s one of the most talented chefs I’ve worked with. … (He’s) definitely going to be having a lot of influence.”

“Getting back, having fun, cooking really good food and keeping high expectations,” McDonald said. “That’s our main goal: to cook good food for good people.”

 

-Caravelli and Andrew photos by Carmen Troesser; McDonald photo by Greg Rannells

First Look: Butchery

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

Carnivores, prepare your grills and break out your roasting pans. Full-service butcher shop and food emporium Butchery has opened its doors. In June, Truffles announced it would add the meat market next door to the restaurant at 9202 Clayton Road in Ladue. Since quietly unlocking doors in late August, Butchery has seen a steady flow of patrons hungry for everything from house-made sausages to premium cuts of beef.

Truffles executive chef Brandon Benack directs operations at Butchery, while meat geek Andrew Jennrich helms the chopping block. Together, they’ve created a unique shop. “Few people in St. Louis are dealing with whole animals,” said Jennrich, noting that Butchery can provide hard-to-find cuts like tomahawk steaks and secreto, a little-know piece near the pork belly, all typically not available at other butcher shops.

While beef, pork, lamb and chicken are sourced from highly regarded local and regional farms, Butchery also makes numerous meat products in-house. It boasts a state-of-the-art aging room for curing charcuterie and offers prepared and ready-to-cook items like sausages, beef patties and pork potpies. Butchery even renders animal fat and sells it in 8-ounce containers. “We’re selling flavor,” Benack said. The Butchery will even marinate your cut for free using the Cryovac machine at Truffles to vacuum-seal it.

Apart from all the meaty goodness, patrons will find local cheeses, myriad house-made condiments, grab-and-go sides, a sandwich menu, a selection of boutique pantry perks and wines that hail from Truffles’ award-winning wine list.

The shop is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Here’s a look at what’s happening at Butchery:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

-photos by Meera Nagarajan

Hit List: 4 new places to try this month

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

 

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Sweetology: 9214 Clayton Road, Ladue, 314.736.4800, sweetology.com

Just when you thought you’d exhausted your outings-with-kids options, sucrose playground Sweetology opens its doors. At this interactive retail concept, patrons young and old can get their hands sticky decorating cookies, cupcakes and cakes (including gluten-free varieties). The process includes stopping at the wish machine, which dispenses edible candy that you can write on and then insert inside your treat; using the frosting dispenser and mixology machine that will squirt out just the right shade of chartreuse; and choosing from nearly 200 sugar art options for decorations to turn that cupcake into a sugary masterpiece. Exhausted parents: Let the Sweetologists guide the kiddos through the decorating experience while you relax in The Drinkery with a cup of coffee or a glass of wine. Good luck leaving without a bag of candy tapped from a massive bulk selection that also includes all-natural and dye-free sweets.

 

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Lulu’s Local Eatery: 3201 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, 314.300.8125, luluslocaleatery.com

Popular food truck Lulu’s Local Eatery has found its abode on bustling South Grand. You’ll find hearty wraps and sandwiches filled with local produce and served up with scratch sauces, plus a handful of noodle and stir-fry bowls and even a kids menu. Followers of this lunch wagon will notice that many of their favorite rotating specials now have a permanent place on the brick-and-mortar menu. As for sides, expect to find us indulging in both the kale salad and tater tots. After ordering from the counter that’s sustainably outfitted with repurposed wood, head to the patio where you can admire vegetables and herbs growing in recycled yellow filing cabinets. Food this fresh, flavorful and filling – not to mention super affordable – will keep even meat lovers contented. Just wait until the meal is over to tell them that Lulu’s isn’t just a vegetarian restaurant; it’s vegan.

 

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4204 Main Street Brewing Co.: 4204 Main St., Belleville, 618.416.7261, mainstreetbrewingco.com

Belleville’s first brewery in decades towers above surrounding fast-food chains and mom-and-pop spots lining Main Street. The former Amarillo Tex now sports dark leather, gleaming wood and shining fermentation tanks. Order a four-brew flight from the seven options currently on tap (Make sure two of your picks are the saison and California Common Rye.). The meat-and-potatoes crowd will find a wide selection of Certified Angus Beef steaks and burgers. Among the many dishes with flavor twists, try the stuffed mushrooms with pickled beet-horseradish sauce. House-made whole-grain mustard spiked with beer accompanies a croque-monsieur stuffed with smoked ham, apples, shallots and caramelized aged white cheddar. An open-faced meatloaf sandwich is packed with flavor, wrapped in applewood bacon and smothered in gravy. For dessert, pair a chocolate stout with the profiterole, which eschews traditional choux in favor of fried biscuit dough.

 

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ArtBar Saint Louis: 2732 Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314.769.9696, artbarstl.com

This colorful watering hole on Cherokee Street is to the creative set what sports bars are to Cardinals fans. Art lines the walls and artists in all media are encouraged to use the space to perform, create and imbibe. Cozy up to the 54-foot bar and choose from 15 wines by the glass and nearly 20 local brews, or have the bartender craft a cocktail using small-producer spirits and house-made syrups. Build a board from a changing selection of local meats, cheeses and house-made pickles. Or fill a paper cone with the daily popcorn flavor. And if all that inspiration moves the artist in you, pick up the colored pencils and paper handed to you when you sit down and doodle away.

 

 -photos by Michelle Volansky

 

 

 

The Scoop: Extra Virgin, an Olive Ovation relocating to Colonial Marketplace on Ladue Road

Monday, April 8th, 2013



{Extra Virgin, an Olive Ovation owner Marianne Prey}

Extra Virgin, an Olive Ovation is getting ready for a change of address. The specialty shop announced that it will be moving this summer to 8829 Ladue Road in a portion of the space formerly occupied by Wild Oats in the Colonial Marketplace shopping plaza.

News from Extra Virgin came on Friday in an email sent to its supporters. The announcement noted that the relocation will mean a 30-percent increase in space as well as curbside parking. The email mentioned: “We’ll have a big party table, space for classes during store hours and room for many more of your favorite products.” Extra Virgin is one of a handful of businesses taking space in Colonial Marketplace. The Original Pancake House and fast-casual Italian eatery Cini are also both adding a location in the shopping plaza.

The specialty olive oil shop currently remains open for business at its location at 143 Carondelet Plaza in Clayton.

The Scoop: Jack Mac to head the kitchen at Schneithorst’s

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Veteran chef Jack MacMurray III has been hired as the executive chef at Schneithorst’s in Ladue. MacMurray, who is moving on from the top culinary post at Kirkwood Station Brewing Co., will begin his tenure at the German restaurant located at 1600 S. Lindbergh Road next Tuesday, Sept. 4.

MacMurray called the cuisine that he will prepare at Schneithorst’s a combination of “Jack Mac American” and authentic German, adding that German offerings will be increased from those currently on the menu. MacMurray is no stranger to Alpine cuisine. He spent five years at Sonnenalp Resort of Vail, where three of the four restaurants he oversaw focused on Bavarian, Swiss and Austrian dishes. MacMurray’s goal in his new venture of “taking it to the next level” at Schneithorst’s won’t just involve menu changes, either, though the first change is scheduled to debut in about a month. The restaurant will also soon see more beer tastings, seminars and dinners.

MacMurray explained that while he had been planning to open his own restaurant – a project that he first shared with The Scoop in January 2011 upon his departure from Sage Urban American Grill in Soulard – “the deal fell through” this past June.

But it appears that MacMurray will soon be busy with another side project. He is planning a pop-up dinner at Mosaic Modern Fusion downtown that will involve five brewmasters. Details are forthcoming.

John Griffiths invited to cook at James Beard House

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Fresh off yesterday’s announcement that one local restaurant and four area chefs were named semifinalists for 2012 James Beard Foundation Awards comes news that the Beard Foundation has its eye on another local chef. John Griffiths, executive chef at Truffles, has been invited to prepare a dinner at the James Beard House in New York this summer. On June 26, Griffiths will prepare a six-course menu for members of the Beard Foundation as well as the media.

In a release issued today, the Beard Foundation explained that, “Chefs are invited to cook at the famous James Beard House based on one’s national or regional reputation, as evidenced by media and resume; known use of high quality, seasonal and local ingredients; demonstrated excellence in a particular discipline; level of interest by James Beard Foundation’s dining members and their guests.”

Since taking over the top spot at Truffles in late 2010, Griffiths has breathed new life into the Ladue restaurant, receiving high praise for his seasonal and local approach to the now ever-changing Italian menu. “An invitation to cook at the Beard House is unrivaled and truly a career highlight like no other,” said Griffiths. “The James Beard Foundation sets the standard for culinary excellence in the country, and I’m proud to use this opportunity to bring more attention to St. Louis and the amazing talent that’s emerging here.”

“We are thrilled to have the talent of chef John Griffiths joining us at the Beard House for this very special dinner, especially as he is the first chef from St. Louis to be invited to the Beard House since Steve Gontram in 1998,” said Izabela Wojcik, director of house programming for the James Beard Foundation.

St. Louisans looking for an excuse to visit The Big Apple can reserve a spot for the dinner by calling the James Beard House reservations department at 212.627.2308 beginning March 7. Reservations will be accepted online at jamesbeard.org starting April 1. Tickets for the general public are $170 per person.

See all our coverage of John Griffiths here.

UPDATE: This post originally stated that John Griffiths is the first St. Louis chef invited to cook at the James Beard House in almost 15 years. That information is incorrect.

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