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Dec 14, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Pollan’

Cinematographer Graham Meriwether talks ‘American Meat,’ screening Thursday at MoBOT

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

091013_americanmeat

 

“American Meat” is a documentary by Graham Meriwether that looks at contemporary chicken, hog and cattle production in the U.S. The film debuted in 2011 and premiered in St. Louis in October 2012. This Thursday, Sept. 12, Meriwether returns to St. Louis for a screening of the film at Missouri Botanical Garden.

Meriwether was inspired to make the documentary after reading Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma. In particular, he was drawn to Joel Salatin, a pasture-based farmer in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley and a central subject in Pollan’s book. “He was jumping off the page with charisma,” said Meriwether. He initially  planned to focus the film on Salatin’s Polyface Farms. “In the end, we decided to cover the entire industry as a whole.”

“Our film has a journalistic nature in the way we portray all the different types of meat production in America,” he said. “We don’t vilify or make one as evil and one as good.” He added that moviegoers “really appreciate how balanced the film is.” And while “American Meat” attempts to give an even-handed look at animal husbandry as it moves from feedlot and confinement systems to pasture-based farming models, Meriwether accedes that “we certainly are advocating local, grass-fed meat production.”

Although Meriwether feels the average American “doesn’t have much of an idea where their [sic] meat is coming from,” he is optimistic that awareness levels are changing. “People are becoming more and more curious about production models. I think we will see a huge increase about food transparency and where food comes from in the coming years.

Meriwether’s next project, a documentary titled “Farmers of America,” should continue to shed light on food production. Still in the preproduction stage and with an anticipated release for fall 2015, “Farmers of America” will focus on beginning and young farmers around the country.

MoBOT, in partnership with Chipotle, is presenting a screening of “American Meat” Sept. 12 as part of its Savor Your Summer film series. The screening will take place at 7 p.m. at the Shoenberg Theater, with a reception beforehand outside the theater at 6:30 p.m. Following the film, there will be a question-and-answer session with Meriwether. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, go here.

 

 

Sauce Celebrity Chef Series presents an afternoon with Michael Pollan

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013



Sauce Magazine and Left Bank Books couldn’t be more excited to have Michael Pollan as our guest for our next Sauce Celebrity Chef Series event held on Thursday, May 9. From noon to 2 p.m. at Moulin event space, Pollan will chat with us over lunch about his latest book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. Pollan will also sign copies of the book and answer questions from the audience.

Globally, through his award-winning books such as The Omnivore’s DilemmaIn Defense of Food and The Botany of Desire, Pollan has been, slowly but surely, changing the way people think about food. Named one of TIME magazine’s 100 most influential people in 2010, Pollan is an advocate for change in food policy (And believe it or not, he knows a thing or two about how to make good food!).

Tickets, available here, are $55 and include lunch and a copy of Cooked. Ticket sales close on May 7; do not delay!

Sauce Celebrity Chef Series presents an afternoon with Michael Pollan

Thursday, April 4th, 2013


For years now, Michael Pollan has been acting as a collective food-conscience of sorts. Globally, through his award-winning books such as The Omnivore’s DilemmaIn Defense of Food and The Botany of Desire, he has been, slowly but surely, changing the way people think about food. Named one of TIME magazine’s 100 most influential people in 2010, Pollan is an advocate for change in food policy (And believe it or not, he knows a thing or two about how to make good food!).

Sauce Magazine and Left Bank Books couldn’t be more excited to have Pollan as our guest for our next Sauce Celebrity Chef Series event held on Thursday, May 9. From noon to 2 p.m. at Moulin event space, Pollan will chat with us over lunch about his latest book Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. Pollan will also sign copies of the book and answer questions from the audience.

Tickets are $55 and include lunch and a copy of Cooked. Buy tickets here.

Let’s discuss this over lunch

Wednesday, August 12th, 2009

If there’s a rush to get down and kiss Michael Pollan’s environmentally friendly loafers, let me join the herd and pucker up.

Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals and most recently, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, is an investigative journalist, essayist and deep thinker whose works have the effect of freezing the fork before it arrives at the mouth.

In Defense of Food reconsiders the typical American diet literally from the ground up, questioning the processing and adulteration of nearly everything in the grocery store. His arguments for our bodies, our farmers and our earth are no less than vital.

The new downtown location of Left Bank Books has brought a healthy dose of culture to our urban core, and the shop’s lunchtime reading group digests In Defense of Food with a book chat and meal on Aug. 19 at noon. For less than $20, participants get the book and a tasty box lunch from City Grocers (soon to be City Gourmet). Call 314.367.6731 or e-mail kris@left-bank.com for reservations. And click here for more on future nonfiction and fiction lunchtime reading groups.

– Byron Kerman

Feed your head: Food Inc.

Friday, June 26th, 2009

Every now and then I used to play a game with myself at the grocery store. I would pretend I was just off the boat from Cold War-era Russia and absolutely bedazzled by the array of brightly packaged foods and vibrantly colored produce available in the supermarket. “Look!” I would gush to my imaginary comrade Svetlana, “There are hundreds of dry cereals! In Leningrad we have one cereal! Here there is meat you can buy every day if you want! There are fruits from the tropics, still fresh, even. Look, here is something called mango. What is mango, anyhow? I don’t know, but I love it! I love America!”

We Americans take the astounding variety and freshness of supermarket foods for granted. And yet, explains the narrator of the new documentary Food Inc., opening today at Landmark Plaza Frontenac, we really have less than we think we do. Keep reading

Eating locally

Tuesday, May 26th, 2009

When award-winning journalist Michael Pollan came to town last Friday to promote his latest book, In Defense of Food, he dined at The Crossing in Clayton. Chef and owner Jim Fiala served up asparagus and ricotta, ravioli with farm-fresh egg and porcini sauce, and grass-fed beef with collard greens. The produce, eggs and meat were all sourced from local farms.

Photo courtesy of Alia Malley

Food icon coming to St. Louis

Thursday, May 14th, 2009

Michael Pollan, the copiously laureled journalist and food pundit, will be speaking at the St. Louis County Library headquarters on May 22 at 7 p.m. (Doors open at 6.) Pollan will also be signing copies of his 2006 blockbuster The Omnivore’s Dilemma and last year’s In Defense of Food. We got up to speed with Pollan on hot topics including food revolution, four-season farmers’ markets and Michelle Obama.

The subtitle of In Defense of Food is An Eater’s Manifesto, which seems fitting because a lot of people consider you a revolutionary. Do you consider yourself a revolutionary?

I am trying to bring about change. I think it’s more likely that we’ll have a reformation than a revolution of the food system. I don’t imagine the supermarket or the industrial food system going away; I can imagine it getting a lot better. I don’t know that we’re going to move to an entirely local system of organic food production — but I think we should get as close as we can because there will be so many advantages for our health and for the health of our environment.

It’s impressive you were able to crystallize the message of a 244-page book in seven words: “Eat Food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

That was kind of scary. I owed my publisher about 50,000 words and it all came down to seven words. I was a little alarmed that they’d have to publish an index card. Keep reading

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