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Oct 22, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘Randolfi’s’

Mike Randolph will open Privado in former Randolfi’s space

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Mike Randolph is finally getting his experimental fine-dining restaurant. As The Scoop reported in late August, Randolph closed his Italian Randolfi’s at 6665 Delmar Blvd. earlier this month. He plans to open Privado in the same space in October.

“It is exciting,” Randolph said. “It took a little bit of time to just get over the hurt of Randolfi’s, but once we figured out what was possible and what we wanted to do, we kept coming back to this.”

Privado will be a fine-dining tasting menu restaurant open on Friday and Saturday evenings for one service of about 15 courses for just 16 patrons. Tickets for each dinner will be available online for $100 each. The first service is planned for Oct. 20.

“I’ve thrown a ton of things at the wall, but I’ve never given [fine-dining] a fair chance,” Randolph said. “We want to be in there two, three, four days a week experimenting, tweaking techniques, processing ingredients.”

He plans to design the space and experience – the plating, lighting, music, even the smell in the room – in ways that were impossible at his previous fine-dining projects (Little Country Gentleman and the Diversion Dinners series), since they took place in other, permanent establishments. “This is no longer a divergence from work – this is work,” Randolph said. “This is a singular focus.”

The bar will be open around weekend dinners, so customers can have a cocktail before or after their meal. A handful of snacks and desserts will be available for those who just want to pop in for a drink as they wait for a table at Público or wander in from The Loop – though reservations are encouraged for bar seats as well.

During the week, Privado will serve as a private event space, available for everything from baby showers to cooking demonstrations, and a kind of commissary kitchen that Randolph’s other restaurants can use when they need extra space. “This will give us a really flexible space,” he said. “We can do anything we need to do within the restaurant group out of that space.”

“We’re excited – that’s the long and the short of it,” Randolph said. “It’s switched from sorrow to excitement.”

 

Photo by Greg Rannells for Mike Randolph

Heather Hughes is managing editor at Sauce Magazine. 

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Randolfi’s will close in The Loop Sept. 9

Monday, August 28th, 2017

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Randolfi’s, at 6665 Delmar Blvd. in The Loop, has announced it will be shutting its doors. The last day of service will be Saturday, Sept. 9.

“We’ve thrown everything that we have into this restaurant. There have been a lot of tears, but it’s time to close the chapter. We are so proud of what we’ve accomplished at Randolfi’s,” said chef and co-owner Mike Randolph in a press release.

Randolfi’s opened in 2015, replacing Randolph’s Neapolitan pizzeria The Good Pie in the same space. It was one of Sauce’s Best New Restaurants 2015.

A number of local chefs who previously worked at Randolfi’s and The Good Pie will be returning for the final night of service on September 9, including Ted Wilson of Union Loafers, Taylor Hamilton of Melo’s Pizzeria and Russ Bodner of Taste.

“Over nine years, we’ve had the pleasure of working with so many amazing people. It’s been the highlight of my career,” Randolph said in the press release. “I look forward to bringing back those alumni for one final service.”

More information on the future of the restaurant will be released at a later date.

Photo by Greg Rannells

Matt Sorrell is staff writer at Sauce Magazine.

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Trendwatch: What’s on the plate, in the glass and atop our wish list right now

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

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1. Proof in the Pudding
We’ve come a long way since Snack Packs – like the butterscotch pot de crème at Olive & Oak, a rich caramel pudding capped with salted caramel and whipped cream. At Pint Size Bakery, occasionally available Yum Cups are filled with rotating pudding flavors. But we all know chocolate reigns supreme, like the blend of milk and dark chocolate pudding with a black cocoa brownie, Thai basil ice cream and fresh blackberries currently on the menu at Taste. Retreat Gastropub recently offered an orange- and lemon-scented chocolate pudding served with toasted marshmallows and almond biscotti, while ClevelandHeath serves its version with Chantilly whipped cream and chocolate-dipped puffed rice.

 

2. Activate
Charcoal has made the move from face masks to the table. Gaining popularity as a detox ingredient at California juice shops like Pressed Juicery and Juice Served Here in recent years, activated charcoal has been making an appearance in cocktails like the inky mezcal-based Moonwalk at New York’s Mission Chinese Food. Closer to home, the black-hearted ingredient showed up for brunch in a chocolate-charcoal waffle at Hiro Asian Kitchen. Try a taste of the darkness at Clementine’s Creamery, where the black cherry ice cream is made with activated charcoal.

 

3. Bring in the Funk
Savory caramels are currently lending a sweet, funky accent to all manner of cuisine in St. Louis. The Copper Pig and Juniper have both combined fish sauce and caramel to great effect – the former on chicken wings and the latter on chicken and waffles. At Vista Ramen, crab caramel brings subtle sweetness and an unctuous umami pop to a tender pork rib dish. A little funk works just as well in cocktails, like The Sound of One Hand Clapping recently at Planter’s House, which combined tequila and mezcal with a miso-caramel syrup. On a more vegetal note, a beet caramel adds earthy sweetness to roasted beets, charred carrots and whipped herbed goat cheese at Boundary, while Vicia recently offered hazelnut financiers with an onion caramel sauce.

 

4. Get Crackin’
Pistachios have been lending their mild, nutty flavor to a variety of cocktail menus around town. The Lights Down, Music Up at ClevelandHeath uses Dumante Verdenoce, an Italian pistachio liqueur, to complement apricot and lemon in the rum-based drink. At The Preston, The Lady of Kildare, a unique tiki cocktail with Irish whiskey instead of the usual rum, includes a house-made pistachio syrup that plays well with tropical flavors like coconut and pineapple. And the Garden of Forking Paths at Taste utilizes the nut itself – ground and rimming a Collins glass.

 

5. The Big Cheese
Grilled cheese sandwiches have been subbing in for buns lately. Take The Big Lou special at The Corner Butcher in Fenton, where two of the sandwiches held two patties topped with nacho cheese. The Libertine appended GC to a classic BLT for a brunch special, and the ever-fluctuating menu at Shift: Test Kitchen recently experimented with The Sasquatch, pulled pork and cole slaw between two gooey sammies. Head to Festus for a Fatty Melt at Main & Mill Brewing Co., a classic patty melt with two grilled cheese sandwiches. And of course, Sugarfire Smoke House and Hi-Pointe Drive-In get in on the action with the Sweet Baby Cheesus special.

 

6. The Spice Route
Area bartenders are reaching into the spice cabinet for a taste of India on their cocktail menus. Retreat Gastropub mixes gin with coconut milk, turmeric and ginger in the curry leaf-topped Golden State, and combines rum, mango, vermouth and chai in its Cash Me Outside cocktail. Reeds American Table opts for yellow curry and coriander mixed with coconut milk in the Philosophical Zombie, while Planter’s House recently featured a chai five-spice syrup with bourbon, tequila and amaro in the Exit Stage Left. Polite Society’s arsenal of house-made tinctures and infusions includes a blood orange and cardamom gastrique featured in the Sanguine cocktail, made with vodka and coconut water. Frazer’s makes use of Desipop, a masala-cumin soda, in its rum-based Kama Sutra. Over at Eclipse, they’re shaking cardamom bitters into the Effervescent Love Machine, while just down the street, the team at Randolfi’s also added cardamom bitters to Advice from a Fortune Cookie and curry bitters to A Rule of Plumb.

 

Photo by Carmen Troesser

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Guide to Drinking 2016: 6 Best Bitter Bottles to Buy

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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Sweet-toothed Americans are increasingly embracing bitter flavors at the bar. Aperol spritzes are everywhere, and according to Randolfi’s head barman Jeffrey Moll, “No respectable home bar should be without Campari.” The pretty pink amaro and its compatriots are for more than your nightly Negroni. Bitter liqueurs and aromatized wines can be enjoyed simply poured over ice with a citrus twist or neat at room temp. We asked Moll, Planter’s House’s Ted Kilgore and Retreat Gastropub’s Tim Wiggins to tell us which bottles best bring out the bitter.

1. Amaro Sibilla is sweetened with honey but tastes boldly bitter and herbal – a siren song for the experienced amaro enthusiast. It’s great in complex cocktails. $54

2. Amaro Sibona boasts a sweet, baking spice-laced start with a smooth, slightly bitter, chocolate finish. Substitute it for Campari or sweet vermouth in your next Negroni. $30

3. Contratto Aperitif is easy to drink with prominent orange notes, like a more complex Aperol. Try mixing equal parts with a dry, sparkling white wine. $30

4. Amaro Nonino’s bittersweet caramel and baking spice notes are best on their own, rather than in a cocktail. Try as an aperitif over ice, or sip it neat after dinner. $50

5. Amaro di Angostura rolls around the palate with the spiced flavors of the classic Angostura bitters. Use in place of vermouth for an amped-up Manhattan. $22

6. Byrrh is a lightly bitter blend of young red wine and quinine. With an approachable flavor profile and price tag, it’s a safe start on your bitter journey. $18

All available at The Wine and Cheese Place in Clayton, wineandcheeseplace.com

Photo by Jonathan Gayman 

Edible Weekend: 2 more events to extend the weekend

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

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There are plenty of ways to fill up this weekend: Need more? Extend your weekend with two Monday night dinners.

 

1. Tiki Dinner
Spice up your Monday with a Tiki Dinner at Mission Taco Joint in the Central West End. This six-course meal includes tropical cocktail pairings like tuna poke and volcano shrimp with Planter’s Punch and char sui short ribs with a Scorpion Bowl. Tickets available at the CWE location.
$60. Aug. 29 – 5 to 11 p.m., Mission Taco Joint, 398 N. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, 314.930.2955, Facebook: Night of Tiki 

 

2. Rosé and Tomato Dinner
Get your fill of amazing summer tomatoes while you still can at the Rosé and Tomato Dinner at Randolfi’s. Enjoy six-courses including a charred tomato risotto with a 2015 Yves Cuilleron Sybel Syrah Rosé, a cioppino-style dish with 2015 Bisson Portofino Ciliegiolo Rosé and a sungold tomato sorbet for dessert. Call for reservations.
$85. Mon., Aug. 29 – 5 to 9 p.m., Randolfi’s, 6665 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314.899.9221, Facebook: Rosé & Tomato Dinner 

 

Still hungry? Sign up for the Edible Weekend newsletter to get the best food events of the weekend delivered to your inbox every Wednesday.

 

Trendwatch: What’s trending now in the STL dining scene (Part 2)

Friday, August 5th, 2016

Miss Part 1? Click here to see even more of what’s trending now in STL.

 

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5. Puttin’ on the Spritz
Located at the intersection of low ABV, amaro and great-sounding names is the spritz cocktail. Traditionally made with bitter liqueur, wine and soda, this versatile Italian aperitif is bubbling up everywhere. Olio has seven varieties, a Spritz Hour and the summer motto: “Yes We Spritz.” Vista Ramen also has a whole spritz section on its drink menu. Order a clementine spritz at Eclipse or ask to create your own at Randolfi’s, with one of the largest amari selections in town.

6. ¡Poz-olé!
Traditional pozole has long held a place on weekend special boards at Mexican restaurants like Lily’s, Taqueria El Bronco and Taqueria Durango. Cleveland-Heath has had pozole on its menu for years, and Kitchen Kulture kept us warm this winter with a pozole verde. Chef Chris Bork at Vista Ramen crossed Japanese and Mexican cultures with a pozole-style ramen full of pulled chicken, hominy and springy ramen noodles. Sidney Street Cafe switched the protein, setting octopus confit swimming in a pozole broth with some chile oil. Meanwhile, Juniper chef-owner John Perkins added a taste of the South with his loose interpretation featuring a country ham consommé with charred tomatoes, black radish, zephyr squash and country ham at a recent pop-up at The Bhive in the Central West End.

7. Krispies Treats
Shelve that crisp rice cereal and taste a different take on the childhood classic. Treat House in New York City has put creative spins on the stuff since 2013, and STL is coming around. Chef-owner Kevin Nashan was an early adopter, classing up the snack by incorporating the fat from cooked foie gras and garnishing with slices of the delicacy at Sidney Street Cafe. Shift, Test Kitchen & Takeout offers a rotating selection of nontraditional squares, including flavors like caramel and Sriracha. Newly opened Start Bar ditches crispies altogether, swapping Cheetos for cereal in its treats, and will rotate other versions like Oreo, granola and Cap’n Crunch.

 

 

Best New Restaurants: No. 4 – Randolfi’s Italian Kitchen

Thursday, December 24th, 2015

Opening a restaurant isn’t easy. Each year, hundreds give it a shot – and not everyone succeeds. Some, however, aren’t just surviving; they’re killing it. In the last year, we ate our way through newly opened restaurants from Alton to Ballwin, compiling a list of places that serve the food and drinks we can’t get out of our heads. They bring something different and exciting to the scene – and they do it damn well. While technical excellence was a must, the service and ambiance also had to win us over. Office debates nearly came to fisticuffs, but at last we agreed on St. Louis’ 11 best new restaurants of 2015. Clear your schedule and book your reservations; you’ve got a lot of eating to do.

 

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Chef-owner Mike Randolph welcomes St. Louisans into his family at his newest restaurant venture, Randolfi’s. The slight spelling alteration honors his Italian heritage; the family’s name was changed when they immigrated to the U.S. in the early 1800s. The space that once housed The Good Pie is now festooned with red-and-white checked tablecloths and photos of generations of Randolphs. It has all the semblance of an old-school Italian-American ristorante, but you won’t find fettuccine Alfredo or garlic bread on this Italian menu.

Neapolitan-style pizzas come out of the same roaring wood-fired pizza oven as in The Good Pie days, but at Randolfi’s, they work well as a sharable starter. Follow the rustic pizza with a sophisticated beef tartare, a silky appetizer with delicate meaty flavor crowned with a luxurious semi-soft cured egg yolk.

Randolph’s passion and attention to detail carry through to the house-made pasta dishes and entrees. Hand-cut pappardelle, toothsome buccatini and more are made with precision and prepared perfectly al dente. Fluffy gnocchi is served as a bed for rich duck confit with briny olives and orange segments for a balanced dish of ricocheting, complementary flavors. Deceivingly simple in its presentation, a pork and apples entree was texturally delightful: pork loin served with soft caramelized apples and tender-crisp celery.

The bar program holds its own against the creative fare. Indulge your curiosity with any of bar manager Jeffrey Moll’s inspired seasonal cocktails. Sip on the No. 37¾, a bourbon and ginger liqueur libation delivered with an apple-wood smoke cap roiling atop a blackberry garnish.

Don’t be selfish when your order arrives; the variety and creativity of Randolfi’s menu begs to be shared with friends and family. Then take your time; linger and enjoy the food, company and la bella vita in a space as intimate as Nonna’s kitchen.

 

-photo by Greg Rannells

The Scoop: Chef Tommy “Salami” Andrew to lead kitchen at Randolfi’s as chef de cuisine

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

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The new year will see a new chef de cuisine at Randolfi’s as Tommy “Salami” Andrew joins the kitchen crew. One of Sauce Magazine’s 2015 Ones to Watch, Andrew was most recently at Byrd & Barrel and accepted the position at Randolfi’s after staging at Mike Randolph’s acclaimed University City eatery.

“We didn’t want to fill the position with just anyone who was available,” Randolph said. “He staged, and then we sat down together to see if it would be a good fit for everyone.”

Andrew will step into the role on Jan. 2, 2016. “I had never been to Randolfi’s, and was surprised at how awesome the food was,” he said. “With my Italian roots, I’m ready to get creative and make really good pasta. I think it’s going to be a great home for me, and I plan to stay a long time.”

Andrew’s Italian roots were only part of the equation for Randolph. “He has a lot of leadership attributes,” Randolph said. “Tommy is cut from the same cloth. Spend a few hours in the kitchen with him, and he’s going to work harder than everybody else and do the things a leader should do.”

In addition to his leadership qualities, Andrew will bring butchering and charcuterie skills, things Randolph said “inherently tie to the kind of Italian food we’re trying to put out.”

 

-photo by Carmen Troesser

 

Trendwatch: What’s on our plates and in our glasses right now – Part 2

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

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{South Side Poutine at Byrd & Barrel}

4. Don’t Call Them Cheese Fries When Americans slather french fries in cheese, meat and gravy, it’s called drunk food. When Canadians do it, it’s called poutine, which has taken St. Louis by storm. Byrd & Barrel covers house-made tater tots in smoked chicken, cheese curds and either smoked mushroom or fried chicken gravy in the South Side Poutine. Winslow’s Home likewise uses tots in its poutine with oxtail gravy. Retreat Gastropub keeps it veg-friendly with mushroom gravy and fried fingerling potatoes, while Small Batch swaps cheese curds for gooey fontina on its house-cut fries. The Libertine ups the ante with sweet peas and foie gras gravy, and the newly opened Copper Pig offers three versions: traditional with beef gravy, a duck confit or a saag paneer option. Urban Chestnut in The Grove has a poutine of the moment that previously featured white gravy with chicken and bacon. Or cash it all in for the foie gras poutine at Sidney Street Cafe featuring a crispy potato cake, french fry-encrusted foie and pickled apples.

5. The Spirit of Norway There are only two things to do during a long Norwegian winter – drink and, well, you can figure it out. Aquavit, a neutral distilled spirit flavored with herbs and botanicals, is the Norwegian sauce of choice. Lucky for us, the clear, full-bodied liquor isn’t just for Scandinavians. Chat up Matt Osmoe at Blood & Sand and sample the flavor variations ranging from dill to caraway to anise. Have it mixed by Randolfi’s Jeffrey Moll in the lemonade-like Madam I’m Adam. Emphasizing Aquavit’s food-friendly qualities, Planter’s House can whip up a bloody mary-esque Bloody Well Right.

6. Grape Crush Chefs around the country are taking grapes to the next level with vinegar, smoke, dehydration and high heat. New York’s Blue Hill restaurant pairs smoked grapes with Brussels sprouts and uses dehydrated grapes in a chicken dish. Blackbird in Chicago pairs pickled grapes with scallops. Get in on the trend closer to home with the newly opened Standard Brewing’s Coraline salad, where sweet-sour pickled grapes are tossed with radishes, goat cheese and spinach. Sound weird? Give them a try at Bridge Tap House and Wine Bar in a starter, or see how they do when roasted with mushrooms in both the seared scallops and the strip steak at Eclipse. At Randolfi’s, try the lamb hearts and sausage starter with roasted grapes.

Check out Part 1 of Trendwatch here

 

-photo by Michelle Volansky 

Trendwatch: What’s on our plate and in our glass right now – Part 1

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

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{Steak tartare at Randolfi’s}

 

1. Put An Egg On It: The Sequel Whites may be the healthy darling of the egg, but yolks are packed with flavor and are perfect for curing with salt and a bit of sugar. Catch them runny on top of steak tartare at Randolfi’s and Truffles, or dried and shaved over a plate of pasta carbonara at Wild Flower. Veritas Gateway to Food and Wine features them frequently on dishes like its avocado gazpacho with crispy pork jowl.

2. Slick Trick Bartenders around town are dropping and shaking oils into cocktails for huge flavor, body and intensity. At Central Table, the What is That, Velvet? daiquiri is shaken with extra-virgin olive oil for a soft, consistent texture. Terry Oliver amps up the orange flavor in Frazer’s Julius Benedict with orange culinary oil, and The Libertine’s Ben Bauer infused olive oil with coriander for his Good Like Goldblum.

3. Baller The great meatball debate rages on: What blend of beef, pork or lamb truly makes the best meatball? We say, throw ’em all out and expand your repertoire. Chef Rob Beasley at Chaumette Winery and Vineyard did just that, adding elk meatballs to his fall menu, served atop romesco sauce with polenta cakes and greens. The kitchen crew at Retreat Gastropub crowns a nest of spaghetti squash with turkey meatballs and yellow tomato jam. In September, Kitchen Kulture’s Michael Miller rolled up a chicken-fennel version along with a veg-friendly chickpea-pimento option at his Thursday Sump lunch. And this summer, Death in the Afternoon dedicated an entire dinner menu to meatballs, serving up three options: traditional spicy pork, a ground turkey and vegan version using quinoa.

-photo by Greg Rannells

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