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May 23, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘Recipe’

Just Five: Red Hot Riplets Chicken Tenders

Monday, May 15th, 2017

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It’s a St. Louis thing, like Provel on pizza and pineapple Vess soda. Not everyone gets it. And that’s OK. Some flavors are just wired into your DNA. Just thinking about Old Vienna Red Hot Riplets and a chocolate malt puts me smack dab into sixth grade again. They’re my version of Proust’s madeleine, and I won’t apologize for it. These chips are spicy as heck and just a little sweet. They are a color rarely found in nature, but proudly preservative free. Note that no additional salt or pepper is added to this recipe. The chips and a little honey are all the flavor you need.

 

Red Hot Riplets Chicken Tenders
4 servings

1½ cups buttermilk
3 Tbsp. honey, plus more for drizzling
14 oz. chicken tenderloins
1 5-oz. bag Old Vienna Red Hot Riplets
½ cup flour

• In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and honey until the honey is dissolved. Add the chicken tenderloins and soak 2 to 3 hours.
• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
• In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the chips and flour 5 or 6 times, until a course crumb mixture forms. Pour in a shallow dish.
• Working a few pieces at a time, gently shake the excess buttermilk from the tenders. Dredge in the potato chip mixture until well coated and place on the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining tenders.
• Bake 20 to 25 minutes, then drizzle with a little honey and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This.

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Just Five: Blueberry Rum Slush

Just Five: Pork Chop Pepper Confit

 

Just Five: Blueberry Rum Slush

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

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I recently painted myself into a corner. While preparing to teach a cooking class, I added a Blueberry Rum Cocktail to the menu. I hadn’t actually developed the drink yet, but it sounded like something easy to create in five ingredients. And then, well, I forgot about it.

A few weeks before the class, I rushed to create a tasty cocktail. Blueberries. Rum. Three more things – go! I spent a Friday evening, muddling, crushing and pureeing fresh blueberries to get the most out of them. I mixed them with light and dark rum, citrus, lavender, Chambord, soda water, ginger ale, ginger beer… Nothing wowed. The rum overpowered the delicate blueberries. To bring out their intense flavor, they really need to be cooked.

It was time to try something else – blueberry juice. There are a few different blueberry juice blends, but I found a bottle of pure juice (R.W. Knudsen Just Blueberry Juice) at my local grocery, and it packed the blueberry punch I was after. Creme de cassis, a blackcurrant liqueur, gives the drink a little boost, and throwing everything into the blender makes a refreshing, not overly sweet seasonal cocktail.

This recipe took years off of my life and made me question my skills, but I can proudly say that this is a fine drink, my friends. And be careful: they go down easy!

 

Blueberry Rum Slush
4 servings

2 cups ice
2 cups blueberry juice
12 oz. ginger ale
1 cup white rum
½ cup creme de cassis
4 sprigs fresh rosemary to garnish

• Place the ice, blueberry juice, ginger ale, rum and creme de cassis in a blender and blitz until frothy. Pour into 4 large serving glasses.
• Slap the fresh rosemary between your palms to release the oils. Garnish each drink with a rosemary sprig and serve with a straw.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This.

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Grilled: Smashed Chicken

Thursday, May 11th, 2017

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A whole bird roasted over an open flame is one of life’s simplest pleasures. This brick-smashed chicken recipe keeps it that way – simple, straightforward and satisfying. Rather than crushing the bird, the heated bricks lock in the flavor and help cook both sides more evenly. The key to this method is indirect grilling following by a swift, controlled sear to crisp the skin over direct medium-low heat. The result: a savory, piping hot chicken with skin so crunchy, it begs to be torn off and enjoyed as an appetizer.

 

Smashed Chicken
3 to 4 servings

1 3½- to 4-lb. whole chicken, giblets removed
3 Tbsp. room-temperature butter, divided
1½ Tbsp. kosher salt
½ Tbsp. freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable oil for greasing
Half a lemon
1 head garlic, halved crosswise

Special equipment: 2 bricks wrapped in aluminum foil

• Prepare a charcoal grill for high, indirect heat. Place the bricks next to the charcoal chimney to preheat.
• Spatchcock the chicken by using sharp kitchen shears to cut along both sides of the backbone and remove it. Fold the chicken open like a book, cracking the breastbone so the chicken lays flat on the work surface (you can ask your butcher to do this).
• Rub the chicken all over with 1½ tablespoons butter, then generously sprinkle with salt and pepper.
• Place chicken skin side-down over indirect heat. Use a heatproof glove or heavy-duty tongs to place 1 brick atop each half. Cover and grill 25 minutes.
• Set the bricks to the side, flip the chicken and place the bricks back atop the bird. Cover and cook 25 minutes.
• Place the lemon half and garlic halves over indirect heat.
• Brush the side of the grill over direct heat with vegetable oil. Remove the bricks and place the chicken skin side-down, cover and sear 10 minutes.
• Remove the chicken, lemon and garlic from heat. Let the chicken rest 10 minutes.
• Meanwhile, remove the grilled garlic cloves from their skins. Melt the remaining 1½ tablespoons butter in a small heatproof bowl. Whisk in the juice from the grilled lemon and 4 grilled garlic cloves.
• Drizzle the sauce over the chicken and serve with the remaining garlic cloves.

 

Matt Berkley is a contributing writer for Sauce Magazine. 

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Make This: Arepas

Monday, May 1st, 2017

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This tortilla-pancake lovechild can be sliced and filled or topped with just about anything.

In a medium bowl, combine 2 cups warm water, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil and 1 teaspoon kosher salt and stir until the salt dissolves. Gradually add 2 cups masarepa (arepa flour, available at most international groceries), stirring constantly 1 minute. Cover the bowl with a towel and let rest 10 minutes.

Divide the dough into 8 equal portions and shape into 5-inch patties, ½-inch thick.

Heat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat, brush lightly with vegetable oil, add 4 arepas and cook until golden brown with some charred spots, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Let cool on a wire rack and repeat with the remaining arepas.

Top with:
• Butter and agave

• Guacamole and cojita cheese

• Black beans and hot sauce

• Carnitas or barbacoa

• Nutella and crushed peanuts

 

Photo by Julia Calleo

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also writes the online recipe column, Just Five.

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Grilled: Cilantro-Lime Swordfish Skewers

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

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Thick, meaty swordfish steaks are ideal for grilling year-round. While more delicate fish needs to be coddled and carefully cooked in special grill pans, a rough and ready piece of swordfish can be tossed directly on a red-hot grill with no fear of flaking or falling through the grate. Fresh swordfish cuts are the key to these skewers, which feature bold sturdy fish marinated in a zesty, island-inspired cilantro-lime mix. Thread hunks of fish onto skewers with fresh veggies, and then quickly sear over a roaring hot grill. Consume an umbrella drink while grilling for proper effect.

 

Cilantro-Lime Swordfish Skewers
4 to 6 servings

4 Tbsp. olive oil
4 cloves fresh garlic chopped
Juice of 1 lime
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
½ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
4 ½-pound swordfish steaks, cut into large pieces
1 bell pepper, cut into large pieces
1 large zucchini, cut into large pieces
½ large red onion, cut into large pieces
12 cherry tomatoes
2 Tbsp. chopped cilantro

• In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, garlic, lime juice, soy sauce, salt and pepper. Add the swordfish pieces, stir to coat and refrigerate 30 minutes.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for high, direct heat.
• Thread skewers with the fish, bell peppers, zucchini, red onion and tomatoes, alternating between the fish and vegetables as desired. There should be 4 pieces of fish per skewer.
• Lightly oil the grill surface. Place 4 skewers over direct heat and sear 6 minutes. Flip, then grill another 6 minutes, until the fish is firm. Repeat with the remaining skewers. Garnish with the cilantro and serve.

 

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Baked: Sriracha Crackers

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

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Since I usually bake sweet cookies, I wanted to try my hand at savory crackers. The spicy Sriracha kick is nicely balanced with some coarse sugar sprinkled on top. It’s a simple, savory snack that’s great to have around when you’re feeling peckish.

 

Sriracha Crackers
Adapted from a recipe at The Fairy Kitchen
15 to 20 crackers

2 Tbsp. Sriracha
1 Tbsp. dark soy sauce
½ cup cream cheese
1/3 cup room-temperature salted butter
1 1/3 cup flour, plus more if needed
1 egg
1 Tbsp. coarse sugar

• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
• Make the glaze by whisking together the Sriracha and soy sauce together in a small bowl. Set aside.
• In a large mixing bowl, combine the cream cheese and butter with a wooden spoon. Add the flour and the egg and stir to combine, then mix with your hands and form into a ball, adding more flour if the dough is too sticky.
• Transfer to a lightly floured work surface and flatten into a disc, then roll to ¼-inch thick.
• Use a cookie cutter to cut out desired shapes and place on the baking sheet, leaving about 1 inch between crackers. Bake 10 minutes.
• Brush each cracker with the Sriracha glaze and sprinkle with the sugar.
• Bake another 8 minutes, until the cracker bottoms are brown. Let cool completely on a wire rack to crisp before serving.

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Grilled: Smoked Whiskey Wings

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

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Rich wood smoke and serious heat from a homemade dry rub send these chicken wings into another stratosphere – and soaking them in whiskey certainly doesn’t hurt either. An extended bath in a boozy marinade helps keep the wings plump and moist throughout the smoking process. Simple enough to pull off in an afternoon, these gorgeously charred babies make for a wonderful alternative to traditional deep fried or grilled wings.

 

Smoked Whiskey Wings
4 to 6 servings

4 cups water
¼ cup bourbon or mild American whiskey
4 lbs. chicken wings, drumettes and flats separated
2 tsp. cayenne pepper
2 tsp. chili powder
2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp. garlic powder
2 tsp. kosher salt
2 tsp. onion powder
2 tsp. paprika
2 tsp. sugar

• In very large bowl, stir together the water and whiskey. Add the wings, cover the bowl with plastic and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight.
• Remove the wings from the marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Discard the marinade.
• In a small bowl, make a dry rub by combining the remaining ingredients. Liberally coat the wings in the dry rub.
• Prepare a charcoal grill or smoker for medium-low indirect heat, around 300 degrees. When the coals are gray, add 1 cup hickory or apple wood chips. Place the wings over indirect heat, arranging the larger pieces closest to the fire. Cover the grill and smoke 40 minutes. Add another 1 cup wood chips, cover and smoke another 40 minutes, adding fresh charcoal as needed.
• Remove the wings and cover with foil until ready to serve.

 

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Make This: Thai Noodles with Gai Lan

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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Skip the Thai takeout and put this dish on the table in 15 minutes flat. In a medium bowl, pour boiling water over 14 ounces rice stick noodles and let sit 7 minutes. Drain and rinse the noodles then toss them with 2 tablespoons sesame oil. In a small bowl, combine ⅓ cup soy sauce, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1½ tablespoons chile-garlic sauce, 1 tablespoon grated ginger and 2 teaspoons rice vinegar. Set aside. In a large skillet or wok over high heat, warm 3 tablespoons vegetable oil. Add the noodles to the skillet with 6 cups roughly chopped gai lan. Saute 2 minutes, then stir in the sauce and cook 1 to 2 minutes more. Garnish with ⅓ cup each chopped basil, cilantro and mint; ¼ cup chopped peanuts; and lime wedges.

 

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Photo by Greg Rannells

Grilled: Curried Barbecue Spare Ribs

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

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These are easily the best ribs I have ever made. Individual ribs are seared and cooked in a bath of colorful Asian barbecue sauce over indirect heat. As someone who has royally screwed up countless slabs of ribs using the old dry-rubbed, slow-smoked method, I loved that this method was entirely no-fuss – zero marinade time, zero brining, zero smoking and zero headaches. The unlikely secret to this dish is the curry powder, which creates a rich, savory sweet sauce that drenches each rib.

 

Curried Barbece Spare Ribs
6 servings

½ cup ketchup
¼ cup soy sauce
2 large garlic cloves, diced
1 Tbsp. curry powder
1 Tbsp. rice wine vinegar
1 Tbsp. vegetable oil
1 tsp. Sriracha
½ tsp. sesame oil
½ tsp. sugar
4 lbs. pork spare ribs (or baby back), cut into single ribs
Diced green onions, for garnish

• In a large bowl, make a barbecue sauce by whisking together the ketchup, soy sauce, garlic, curry powder, rice wine vinegar, vegetable oil, Sriracha, sesame oil and sugar. Set aside.
• Prepare a charcoal grill for high, indirect heat. Place a large cast-iron skillet or grill pan on the cool side of the grill.
• Sear the ribs over direct heat, flipping occasionally to avoid flare-ups, 12 to 15 minutes. Place the ribs in the cast-iron skillet and brush each with a layer of barbecue sauce. Cover the grill and cook over indirect heat 45 minutes.
• Brush the ribs with another layer of barbecue sauce. Add about 15 pieces of charcoal to the fire. Cover the grill and cook over indirect heat another 45 minutes.
• Remove the skillet from grill. Brush the ribs with the remaining barbecue sauce. Cover the skillet with foil and let rest 15 minutes. Serve garnished with the green onions.

 

More Grilling Recipes 

Smoked Trout Chowder

Stuffed Greek Burgers

Korean Pork Steaks

Grilled Halloumi

 

Matt Berkley is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and the Nightlife critic. 

By the Book: Appetites by Anthony Bourdain

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

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Like most food writers in their 20s and 30s, I aspired to have Anthony Bourdain’s career once. Jetting around the world, partaking in phenomenal food and drink while someone else footed the bill? That was the life. Alas, Sauce Magazine doesn’t have the same travel budget as CNN, but I’ve continued to live vicariously through Bourdain’s TV series and memoirs. He finally released a cookbook inspired not by his decades of globetrotting, but rather by dishes he cooks on rare nights at home with his 8-year-old daughter.

Bourdain devotes an entire chapter to sandwiches, and I opted to make his Meatball Parm Hero. Equal parts ground beef, pork and veal (or in my case, lamb) are mashed with sauteed garlic, onion and fresh herbs, then pan-seared and gently braised in white wine and a homemade pomodoro sauce. Three meats seemed excessive, but each provided intense flavor and a different element: heft, tenderness and fat.

To assemble, simply pile three meatballs on a sturdy roll, add more sauce, drape with mozzarella and grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and broil until the cheese is gooey and browned. I no longer want to be Bourdain (All that jetsetting seems exhausting.), but if this is how he cooks on nights off, I’ll happily eat like him.

Skill level: Easy-ish. Recipes are longer, but they are straightforward and incredibly helpful.
Other recipes to try: Chicken Satay with Fake-Ass Spicy Peanut Sauce, Cast-Iron Grilled Chicken, Meatloaf with Mushroom Gravy
The verdict: Tender meatballs and gooey cheese knocked the lemon cookies off the winner’s pedestal.

 

111616_bythebookdish

 

Meatball Parm Hero
8 servings

3 Tbsp. plus ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium yellow or white onion, peeled and finely diced (about 2 cups)
4 to 6 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
6 sprigs fresh oregano, leaves only, finely chopped
10 to 12 sprigs fresh Italian parsley, leaves only, finely chopped
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 lb. ground beef chuck
1 lb. ground veal
1 lb. ground pork
1 cup panko breadcrumbs
2 eggs, lighten beaten
1½ cups dry white wine
1 quart Pomodoro (recipe follows)
4 Italian semolina hero rolls with sesame seeds, cut in half lengthwise and crosswise
8 oz. fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced
4 oz. Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated

Special Equipment
Short-sided roasting pan large enough to hold 25 to 30 meatballs (11-by-14-inch or similar)
Instant-read thermometer

• In a large, heavy-bottom saute pan, heat 3 tablespoons oil over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, oregano, and parsley, and stir well to coat with the oil. Season with salt and pepper and let cook over medium-low heat for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft and translucent but not browned. Remove from the heat and transfer the onion mixture to a large mixing bowl. Let cool to room temperature. Clean the pan, which you will use to brown the meatballs.
• Add the beef, veal, and pork to the mixing bowl, along with the breadcrumbs and eggs. Season with salt and pepper. Mix well by hand. Form the mixture into 25 to 30 2-inch balls, placing each one on a sheet pan as you form it. Cover the meatballs with plastic wrap and refrigerate them for 15 to 60 minutes.
• Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Remove the meatballs from the fridge.
• Heat ¼ cup oil in the saute pan over medium-high heat. Working in batches, sear the meatballs on all sides in the oil, turning them carefully with the spatula and tongs and adding more oil as necessary to keep them from sticking to the pan. Remove the cooked meatballs to the roasting pan.
• Once all the meatballs are in the roasting pan, add the wine and 1 cup of the pomodoro sauce to the pan so that the liquid reaches about halfway up the sides of each meatball. Transfer the pan to the oven and cook for 25 to 30 minutes, until cooked through but still juicy (the interior of a meatball should reach 150 degrees on an instant-read thermometer.
• While the meatballs are cooking, in a small, heavy-bottom saucepot, gently warm the remaining pomodoro sauce, stirring occasionally to keep it from scorching.
• Remove the meatballs from the oven, and set the oven to broil.
• On the clean sheet tray, arrange 3 meatballs in the center of each of 8 hero roll bottoms. Add a few tablespoons of pomodoro sauce to each set of meatballs and drape each with a slice of mozzarella and a good sprinkling of the Parmigiano-Reggiano. Place the sandwiches under the broiler for about 2 minutes, until the mozzarella is slightly browned and bubbling. Top each with the remaining bread and serve immediately.

 

Pomodoro
5 cups

10 ripe red plum tomatoes
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
1 28-ounce can peeled plum tomatoes and their juices
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 Tbsp. (¼ stick) unsalted butter
6 fresh basil leaves, gently torn into a few pieces

Special Equipment
Ice-water bath (large bowl filled with ice and cold water)
Immersion blender

• Fill a large, heavy-bottom pot with water and bring it to a boil. Use paring or serrated knife to cut an X on both ends of each fresh plum tomato. Once the water boils, add the tomatoes to the pot, working in two batches if necessary to avoid overcrowding the pot or reducing the temperature too drastically. Allow the tomatoes to simmer in the water for about 30 seconds, until the skin begins to loosen and peel away from the flesh. Using tongs, remove the tomatoes to the ice-water bath. Once the tomatoes are cool enough to handle, peel off and discard the skin, squeeze out and discard the seeds, and coarsely chop the flesh.
• In a large, heavy-bottom sauté pan, heat the oil over medium-low heat and add the onion, garlic, and pepper flakes. Let cook 1 to 2 minutes, stirring to keep the aromatics from browning, then add the chopped plum tomatoes and the canned tomatoes and their juices, squeezing the canned tomatoes by hand to crush them up a bit before they go into the pan. Stir well, season lightly with salt and pepper, and let cook for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes have completely broken down.
• Remove the sauce from the heat and use the immersion blender to puree the sauce. (You may wish to carefully transfer the sauce to a large, deep mixing bowl, which will make it easier to manipulate the blender.) Return the sauce to gentle heat, add the butter, and cook and stir until the butter has been incorporated into the sauce. Stir in the basil leaves. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.

Reprinted with permission from Ecco Publishing 

 

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