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Dec 15, 2017
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Posts Tagged ‘Recipe’

Recipe: Pear and Currant Compote

Wednesday, December 6th, 2017

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One of my favorite items to take to holiday gatherings is an interesting jam or compote to accompany a cheese board. Consider recipes of years past: spiced carrot jam, onion jam and, if you want to go way back with me, bacon jam. I love bringing the host something delicious in a pretty glass jar, something they can put out immediately on a cheese tray or add to their holiday meal later.

This combination of pears, ginger and currants is perfect when paired with goat cheese, mascarpone or sharp cheddar. It is equally delicious on pork tenderloin sandwiches or with smoked or roasted turkey. The black pepper enhances the pungent crystallized ginger, and the texture is lovely with bits of chewy currant and ginger in each bite.

This recipe is pretty forgiving. You can use a mix of ripe and underripe pears, though you may have to add water or more orange juice to reach your desired consistency. This is closer to a compote than a jam, but you can use an immersion blender or food processor for a smoother texture.

 

Pear and Currant Compote
2 cups

3 cups diced ripe pear, peeled and cored
¾ cup sugar
½ cup currants
¼ cup minced crystallized ginger
Zest and juice of 1 medium orange
½ cup water, as needed
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

• In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, simmer the pears, currants, sugar, ginger, orange juice and zest 45 to 60 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the water as needed, until the pears are softened.
• Mash the pears with a potato masher to reach the desired consistency, and stir in the black pepper. Let cool, then store in a sealed jar up to 2 weeks.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Holiday Shrub

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

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This shrub’s garnet hue and seasonal aromatics make it a gorgeous hostess gift or party cocktail. To serve, mix one part shrub into four parts prosecco, or use the same amounts mixed into ginger ale or sparkling cider for a mocktail. For a festive nightcap, mix the shrub with two ounces bourbon as you sit by the fire.

 

Cranberry Shrub
2 cups

1 lb. fresh or frozen cranberries
1 cup apple cider vinegar
¾ cup sugar
¾ cup water, divided
¼ cup orange peel (avoid the white pith)
3 whole cloves
4 whole peppercorns

• In a large saucepan, combine the cranberries, vinegar, sugar, ½ cup water, orange zest, cloves and peppercorns and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook 7 to 10 minutes, until the cranberries begin to burst, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, cover and let cool to room temperature.
• Pour the mixture into a large mason jar or other airtight container, cover and refrigerate 2 hours.
• Strain the mixture into a bowl through a fine mesh-sieve. If the mixture is too thick, pour the remaining ¼ cup water over the solids in the sieve. Press the solids with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula to remove any more liquid. Shrub will keep, refrigerated, up to 2 months.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Cranberry Beignets

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

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Let’s face it: Everyone has cranberry sauce leftover after a Thanksgiving meal. You’d notice if it was missing from the table, but there’s only so much you can take of its sweet-tartness when the rest of your plate is piled high with comfort food. So what to do with the extra sauce? I’m here to help.

I intended to make jelly doughnuts, but I couldn’t find my round cookie cutter, so I had to use my square one instead. To my surprise, the only difference between beignets and doughnuts are their shape … so I made beignets!

Jelly-filled beignets can be made the night before and refrigerated to rise overnight, or you can start them earlier in the morning in time for a late weekend brunch. They are adaptable; swap the citrus zest for a teaspoon of vanilla or almond extract. Fill them with leftover cranberry sauce, toss them in sugar and serve immediately to people you love.

 

Cranberry Beignets
Adapted from a recipe at Smitten Kitchen 
8 to 10 servings

3 oz. lukewarm milk
2 Tbsp. granulated sugar
1¼ tsp. active dry yeast
1 egg yolk
Zest of half a lemon or orange
1 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 cup plus 2½ Tbsp. all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
Pinch of kosher salt
Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
½ cup cranberry sauce
Powdered sugar to coat

• Mix the milk, sugar and yeast in a large bowl and let sit for 5 minutes, until it starts to foam.
• Whisk in the yolk, zest and butter until combined. Add the flour and the salt, then mix with your hands to bring the dough together into a sticky ball. Transfer it to a well-oiled mixing bowl and let rise in a dark corner about 1 hour.
• On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough about 2 inches thick. Use a square cookie cutter or sharp knife to cut 2-by-2-inch squares and place on a cookie sheet. Cover with oiled plastic wrap and let rise in a dark corner 2 to 4 hours or refrigerate overnight.
• In a large high-sided pan, preheat 2 inches oil to 350 degrees over medium heat. If you don’t have a thermometer, check if the oil is ready by placing a wooden spoon handle into the hot oil. When bubbles form around it, the oil is ready.
• Working in batches, fry 3 to 4 beignets about 30 seconds to 1 minute, then carefully flip and fry another 30 seconds to 1 minute, until browned all over. Use a spider to remove the doughnuts and drain on a paper-towel lined plate and let cool. Repeat with the remaining dough.
• Fill a piping bag fitted with a round nozzle with cranberry sauce. Poke a hole into the side of the doughnuts with the nozzle, then gently fill with cranberry sauce until a bit of jam sticks out.
• Serve immediately covered in sifted powdered sugar.

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who blogs at A Song in Motion

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• Recipe: Leftover Cranberry Tart

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Recipe: Muhammara Dip

Wednesday, November 15th, 2017

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Dear Ben Poremba,

You are a wealth of inspiration to me. I cannot dine at one of your restaurants (Nixta, Olio, Elaia, Parigi, La Patisserie Chouquette…) without learning something about flavors, service, presentation and ambience. Each time, I go home inspired to try and recreate a dish or two at home.

The flavors at Olio speak to me the most. If you put a plate of bread and yummy dips in front of me, especially if there’s a cocktail involved, you will win my heart forever – or at least for a couple of hours. Olio’s muhammara dip is perfect in its simplicity: the gorgeous color, the silky texture and clear, but nuanced flavors. The best part is there are only three – three! – ingredients listed on the menu: piquillo peppers, walnuts and pomegranate molasses. It’s like you’re begging me to turn it into a Just Five. Well, my dear, I’ve done it.

Until we meet again,
Dee

 

Muhammara Dip
Inspired by a recipe at Olio
2 cups

¾ cup whole walnuts
1 12-oz. jar roasted piquillo peppers or roasted red peppers, drained
2 Tbsp. pomegranate molasses or lemon juice
2 small cloves garlic, chopped
1 tsp. cumin
½ tsp. kosher salt
¼ cup olive oil

• In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the walnuts, stirring constantly, until aromatic, about 5 minutes.
• Place the walnuts, peppers, molasses, garlic, cumin and salt into a food processor and pulse until smooth. With the food processor running, pour in the olive oil until the mixture is creamy. Serve with warm pita or pita chips.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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5 mind-blowing brining recipes to make now

Thursday, November 9th, 2017

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Brining is the secret technique behind many of your favorite restaurant meat dishes. A simple way to both season and prevent meat from drying out, the standard brine equation is a cup of kosher salt and a half-cup of sugar in a gallon of water. You can introduce a wide range of adjunct to that base – try herbs or hot peppers or change the sugar to molasses. Whatever flavor profile you try, the magic of osmosis will render your dish salted and succulent. Try out this technique with anything from green tomatoes to DIY pastrami:

Recipe: Grilled Brined Shrimp

Recipe: Brined Chicken Wings

Recipe: Turkey Roulade

Recipe: Fried Green Tomatoes

Recipe: Pastrami

Photo by Carmen Troesser

Anne Marie and Dan Lodholz are longtime contributors to Sauce Magazine. 

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Recipe: Pumpkin Spice Macarons

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

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These macarons are adorable and full of pumpkin spice goodness. I added pumpkin pie spice to the shells, and the filling is a French yolk buttercream with pumpkin puree, espresso and, yes, even more pumpkin pie spice blended in. Sandwiched together, these macarons are crisp on the outside and soft and gooey on the inside. Kids can even join in the fun using edible ink markers to draw jack-o-lanterns on them. They’re perfect for your Halloween celebration or any fall festivities.

 

Pumpkin Spice Macarons
15 to 20 macarons

For best results, weigh the ingredients.

100 g. egg whites
35 g. granulated sugar
200 g. powdered sugar
120 g. almond flour
½ Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice
Orange food coloring gel
Green food coloring gel
Pumpkin Spice Filling (recipe follows)
Black edible ink marker (optional)*

• Line 2 baking sheets with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper.
• In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg whites and granulated sugar on high speed until stiff. The mixture should not move when the bowl is turned upside down.
• Sift the powdered sugar, almond flour and pumpkin pie spice into a mixing bowl. Using a spatula, gently fold the dry ingredients into the whipped egg whites. Reserve ¼ cup batter and set aside.
• In the large bowl, add the orange food coloring and mix until the desired hue is reached. Using another clean spatula, add the green food coloring to the reserved batter and mix until the desired hue is reached.
• Add the orange batter to a pastry bag fitted with a round tip. Hold the bag perpendicular to a baking sheet and pipe 1½-inch circles about 1½ inches apart. The batter will spread slightly. When the sheet is full, rap the baking sheets on the counter a few times to settle the batter and remove any air bubbles.
• Add the green batter to piping bag fitted with a small round tip and pipe little mounds at the top each orange circle to mimic a stem.
• Let the cookies rest at least 15 to 30 minutes or up to 2 hours, until the tops are dry to the touch.
• Move the racks to the center of the oven and preheat to 285 degrees.
• Bake 8 minutes, leaving the oven slightly ajar to let air escape (use a wooden spoon to prop the door open, if needed). Rotate the cookies and bake another 8 minutes.
• Let cool completely by carefully lifting the silicone mats or parchment paper from the baking sheets and resting them on the counter or a cooling rack. Remove the cooled cookies and pair them according to size.
• Use the edible ink marker to carefully draw jack-o-lantern faces on the macarons, if desired.
• Assemble the macarons by using a spoon to gently add filling into the center of 1 shell. Top with its partner, then gently push down and twist to spread the filling out. The macarons are best served after 12 hours so the flavors have time to meld. Store refrigerated up to 1 week or frozen 2 to 3 months in an airtight container.

 

Pumpkin Spice Macaron Filling

3 egg yolks
¼ cup water
½ cup sugar
¾ cup (1½ sticks) butter
¼ cup pumpkin puree
2 Tbsp. espresso
1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

• In a mixing bowl, beat the egg yolks. Set aside.
• In a medium saucepan, bring the sugar and water to 238 degrees over medium heat (use a candy thermometer).
• Slowly add the hot syrup to the egg yolks, whisking briskly, until combined. Whisk until the yolk mixture has cooled.
• Use a hand mixer on medium-high speed to beat in the butter, then the pumpkin puree, then the espresso and pumpkin pie spice. The filling should be loose enough to spread, but not watery. Refrigerate to thicken, if needed.

* Edible ink markers are available online or at Michaels in Brentwood.

Amrita Song is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who blogs at A Song in Motion

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Recipe: Parsnip-Carrot Puree

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

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This recipe was inspired by a parsnip side my husband ordered recently at The Crow’s Nest in Maplewood. When I told the owner how fantastic it was, she told me it would soon be off the menu, which meant it was even more important that I figure out how replicate it at home.

This dish will be prominently featured at our Thanksgiving table this year. I added carrots to the parsnips for a little color (and the whole “you never see rabbits wearing glasses” thing). I love this dish served silky smooth, but I respect that some people prefer a little texture in their mashes. You do you, Boo.

 

Peppery Parsnip-Carrot Puree
Inspired by a recipe from The Crow’s Nest
4 servings

2 cups (about 1 lb.) peeled, chopped parsnips
1 cup (about ½ lb.) peeled, chopped carrots
1 cup whole milk
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. butter
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. white pepper

• Place the parsnips, carrots, milk and garlic in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and slowly bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 8 minutes, until the vegetables are easily pierced with a fork.
• Carefully pour the vegetables and milk into a blender or bowl of a food processor fitted with the S-blade. Add the butter, black pepper, salt and white pepper and puree until the mixture reaches the desired smoothness. Adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Peach-Bourbon Milkshake

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Boozy milkshakes are a fun, trendy dessert option. Peaches and bourbon are a great combination, and that left me with a fun “free” fifth ingredient to choose. Mint? Vanilla or almond extract? My decision was made for me when I realized the rock-hard peaches I picked up the previous day hadn’t quite achieved perfectly ripe lusciousness. I needed to coax out some flavor and juice, so I brought out the butter and sugar.

 I decided that if I was going to add butter to a milkshake (insert OMG emoji here), that I may as well go all in. That means this butter is browned, my dears, and it makes all the difference. If you’re catering to teetotaling friends or family members, the bourbon can be poured in after you make the shake.

Peach-Bourbon Milkshake
4 small or 2 large servings

2 large peaches or 3 medium peaches, ripe or just underripe
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
¼ cup brown sugar
5-6 scoops high-quality vanilla ice cream, plus more as needed
½ cup whole milk, plus more as needed
4 oz. bourbon

• Bring a medium saucepan filled with water to a rolling boil over high heat. Prepare an ice bath.
• Slice a small X into the bottom of the peaches with a sharp knife, then place them in the boiling water 45 seconds to 1 minute until the skin just starts to pull away from the X. Remove and immediately plunge them into the ice water bath. Starting at the X, peel the peaches, then pit, slice and set aside.
• Place the butter in a large skillet and melt over medium heat. Gently swirl the pan until the solids just start to turn brown and the butter smells nutty.
• Add the peaches and brown sugar and stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and saute the peaches 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is saucy. Remove from heat and let cool at least 30 minutes.
• In the pitcher of a blender, combine the peach mixture and all its sauce, ice cream, milk and bourbon. Cover and puree until completely blended, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add ice cream or milk to reach the desired consistency.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Crabcake Bites

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Indulging in these decadent little crabcake bites immediately brings me back to my college days in New Orleans when the nights were long and the shellfish plentiful. Since then I’ve have this gnawing desire to fashion a batch of crispy, rich, restaurant-worthy crabcakes – minus any intimidating frills or overly elaborate cooking methods. The concoction I ended up with is a stripped down, no-nonsense version of a classic Baltimore-style crabcake that leans on high quality crab meat amplified by a handful of ingredients easily scrounged from the pantry.

These crowd pleasers are simply prepared on a gas grill in about the time it takes to drain a cold long neck. I suggest the gas grill for this one as the heat is easier to manage and distributes more evenly than charcoal. Most important, don’t skimp on the quality of the crabmeat. Cheap, lousy crab makes this entire exercise pointless. The best bang for your buck is with backfin lump (an 8-ounce package prepped and ready to roll set me back about $13), which contains big pieces of jumbo lump as well as smaller broken up pieces of the body meat.

 

Crabcake Bites
4 to 6 servings

½ cup mayonnaise, divided
½ beaten egg
1½ Tbsp. whole-grain Dijon mustard, divided
½ Tbsp. Worcestershire
1 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. lemon juice, divided
2 tsp. Old Bay Seasoning, divided
½ tsp. hot sauce
Dash paprika
8 oz. back fin or jumbo lump crabmeat, drained and picked over for shells
10 saltines, finely crushed
1 Tbsp. butter

Special equipment: Slotted grill pan

• In a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, egg mustard, Worcestershire, lemon juice, Old Bay, hot sauce and paprika. In a separate bowl, gently combine the crabmeat and cracker crumbs, then gently fold into the mayonnaise mixture. (Do not overwork the mixture.) Cover and refrigerate at least 3 hours or overnight.
• Prepare a gas grill for medium-high heat direct heat. Melt the butter on the grill pan and heat on the grill 5 minutes.
• Spoon out approximately 1 tablespoon crab mixture, forming each into about 12 golf ball-sized bites. Grill the crabcakes in the grill pan over direct heat 4 minutes. Flip and grill 4 minutes on the other side, until both sides are brown and crispy.
• Remove from the heat and allow them to rest 10 minutes before serving
• Meanwhile, whisk together the remaining ¼ cup mayonnaise, 1 tablespoon mustard, 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 1 teaspoon Old Bay in a small bowl until smooth. Serve as a dipping sauce with the crabcakes.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky

Matt Berkley is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who writes Grilled.

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Recipe: Harissa Chicken

Friday, September 8th, 2017

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Using yogurt as a marinade is a great way to keep chicken tender and juicy. Like buttermilk, the acid in a dairy marinade actually tenderizes the meat and imparts its slightly tart taste to the chicken. Spicy harissa is tempered by the dairy and brightened by the lemon zest. Harissa can be found at most international food stores like Global Foods Market, Jay’s International Foods or United Provisions, but a decent substitute can be yours with just five ingredients. It’s not as complex as what you’ll find at the store, but it saved me an extra trip on a busy day.

 

Harissa Chicken
4 servings

½ cup plain Greek yogurt
2 to 4 Tbsp. harissa paste (Optional recipe follows.)
Zest and juice of 1 small lemon
1 tsp. kosher salt
½ cup olive oil
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs or drumsticks
¼ cup torn mint leaves

• In a mixing bowl, whisk together the yogurt, harissa, lemon juice and zest and salt, then whisk in the olive oil.
• Place the chicken in a large zip-top bag and add the yogurt marinade. Seal the bag and massage the chicken to completely coat. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes or overnight.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for medium-high, direct heat.
• Grill the chicken skin side-down 3 to 4 minutes, then flip and cook another 3 to 4 minutes, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reaches 160 degrees.
• Arrange the chicken on a serving platter and immediately top with the mint so the heat releases the oils.

 

Quick Harissa Paste
1/3 cup

5 to 6 garlic cloves, minced
5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1½ Tbsp. smoked paprika
2 tsp. coriander
1 tsp. red pepper flakes
½ tsp. kosher salt

• Combine all the ingredients in a glass bowl and microwave 15 to 30 seconds, until fragrant. Whisk to combine and let cool. Store refrigerated in a sealed jar.

 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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