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Dec 13, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Posts Tagged ‘Saint Louis Hop Shop’

First Look: Saint Louis Hop Shop on Cherokee Street

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

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After being closed for nearly a month, Saint Louis Hop Shop recently reopened at its new location 2600 Cherokee St., offering a larger selection of beverages for craft beer connoisseurs and beginners alike.

At the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Cherokee Street, the 1,500-square-foot storefront is a few doors down from its former address at 2606 Cherokee St., but it gives co-owners and brothers Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin nearly double the space to grow.

“[The other space] was small and we could see that we needed more room,” Harris said. “We really liked what we developed over there, and the goal is to bring that same formula over here and expand on it.”

The new location offers increased refrigeration and more shelving for beer, apparel and glassware. Additionally, a larger variety of ciders, spirits and imports, including more Belgium and lambic options, will be available. The new Hop Shop also features a larger bar area with six rotating taps. Harris said guests can expect a different brew every seven to 10 days.

“We do a lot of sixth barrels, so that gives us the flexibility to constantly bring in new stuff,” Harris said.

Brews currently on top include Dogfish Head Lupu-Luau Coconut IPA, Modern Brewery Citrapolicious, Ace Pineapple Cider, Prairie Artisan Ale Birthday Bomb, Urban Chestnut O-Katz and 4 Hands Chocolate Milk Stout.

With more space, Harris and Griffin also plan to host monthly events and weekly tastings through October. “It gives people a chance to come in and try some seasonal stuff before having to purchase it,” Harris said.

Saint Louis Hop Shop hosts a grand reopening this Saturday, Oct. 7 from noon to 10 p.m. The new location is open Monday through Thursday from noon to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday noon to 10 p.m., and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. Here’s a First Look at what to expect from Hop Shop’s new home:

 

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Photos by Caitlin Lally 

Caitlin Lally is a contributor to Sauce Magazine. 

Related Content
What I Do: Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin of Saint Louis Hop Shop

Beer bottle shop to open on Cherokee Street

Guide to the Holidays 2016: Bottles of Good Cheer

What I Do: Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin of Saint Louis Hop Shop

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Brothers Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin want to talk to you about beer. They’ve set up their Saint Louis Hop Shop with that in mind: choosing the foot traffic-heavy Cherokee Street neighborhood, hosting beer events and offering a short menu of pours to enjoy while you peruse their shelves of carefully selected bottles. Here, the brothers of beer talk family, community and Cherokee Street.

In it Together

“One benefit that comes [from working with family] is understanding – like understanding who they are as a person. I grew up with him; he grew up with me. I know who he is; he knows who I am.” – R.G.

“We get along pretty well – we always have. I think it goes back to what Ryan was saying: We know what to expect from each other, both good and bad. I know I do things that drive him crazy, and he could say the same thing. But at the end of the day, there’s comfort in knowing that you’ve got somebody who’s family – that’s my brother, you know.” – J.H.

Gateway Beer

“It was Boulevard 80-Acre, if I’m not mistaken … a hoppy wheat beer. It was so much different from [Natty Light] – it was no comparison. That’s when I realized that it wasn’t about drinking beer until you can’t drink anymore. I could have one or two after class, and that would be it for the night.” – J.H.

St. Louis on the Rise

“Opening this store has opened my eyes to things outside of what I was familiar with: different people, different ideas, different backgrounds and how St. Louis is coming together, investing in small communities. … People are accepting of new, fresh ideas and I feel like St. Louis is undergoing a renaissance.” – R.G.

Price of Entry

“The cool thing about the beer industry is that for the most part you’re dealing with a lot of like-minded people. … Events have been a key staple of who we are – the culture of the store – because you really get to engage with people past, like, ‘That’ll be $9.99.’ … No beer unless you talk to us.” – J.H.

Candy Crush

“I’m into stouts, and I’d say brown beers, porters, brown ales. … I’m like a candy fiend. I have a big sweet tooth. I’m really into chocolate, something that’s more hearty … those things that lather your tongue with sweetness.” – R.G.

Cherokee Street

“Cherokee Street is a very vibrant place, and people want to be down here. … It’s a great energy. And I feel like it’s a huge support system, between us and other businesses. A lot of stuff in our store came from Antique Row. I go to Byrd & Barrel like every other day. We get coffee at Foam all the time. … You just feel like you’re a part of something when you walk up and down the street.” – R.G.

Photo by Izaiah Johnson

Guide to the Holidays 2016: Bottles of Good Cheer

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

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Put aside your light, workaday brews and reach for something more festive to serve at this extravagant holiday meal. Saint Louis Hop Shop co-owner Justin Harris shared his five picks from double IPAs to rich chocolate stouts to put you in a merry mood.

 

1. Schlafly Tasmanian IPA
Redolent with Galaxy and Australian Topaz hops, this 7.2-percent IPA is heady enough to feel celebratory but won’t weigh you down for a night of decadent food and drink. 6-pack: $10.

2. Destihl Wild Sour Plum Sour Stout
Chocolate and dark fruit combine for a brew that balances sweet and tart. At 5.6 percent, it goes well with lighter hors d’oeuvres or salads. 4-pack: $10.

3. Against the Grain Citra Ass Down
A healthy dose of Citra hops gives this 8-percent American IPA a taste of the tropics that’s balanced by maltiness. 4-pack: $12.

4. Ballast Point Victory at Sea
This rich Imperial porter is infused with sweet notes of coffee and vanilla perfect for post-dinner sipping. Be on the lookout for its elusive peppermint variant to add to the holiday hoopla. 6-pack: $15.50.

5. Evil Twin Liquid Double Fudge
The name doesn’t lie: This Imperial stout packs a creamy, fudgy punch that becomes even more chocolaty as it warms. At 12 percent, this is a beer to share and sip slowly. 22-ounce bottle: $9.

All beers are available at Saint Louis Hop Shop

 

More on Saint Louis Hop Shop

• The Scoop: Beer bottle shop to open on Cherokee Street

Hit List: 5 new places you must try this month

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

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1. Southern: 3108 Olive St., St. Louis, 314.531.4668, stlsouthern.com

Fried chicken has come home to roost in St. Louis, and chef Rick Lewis is adding to the flock with Southern. The former Quincy Street Bistro chef partnered with Pappy’s owner Mike Emerson to open a lunchtime eatery next door to the venerable barbecue joint in Midtown. Southern serves up Nashville-style hot chicken – fried chicken that takes a dip in spicy oil before hitting your tongue with a one-two punch of sweet heat. Order a plate of two, three or four pieces and choose your spice level (mild, Cluckin’ Hot or General Tso’s), then pair it with two sides, such as toothsome mac-n-cheese and Southern greens cooked with salt pork, along with the requisite slice of bread and pickles. Not feeling fried? Order one of nine monster sandwiches, like the Cubano made with Pappy’s pulled pork, house ham, brown ale mustard, bread-and-butter pickles and Gruyere cheese grilled to melty goodness on the flattop. Grab a fountain soda or (soon) a bottle of beer and kick back with a tray of down-home goodness.

 

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2. Tazé Mediterranean Street Food: 626 Washington Ave., St. Louis, 314.254.7953, tazestreetfood.com

Get your fill of eastern Mediterranean fare at fast-casual Tazé in the Mercantile Exchange building downtown. The 115-seat counter-style restaurant focuses on a build-your-own meal concept. Start with a house-made pita or a bowl of saffron rice or mixed greens. Next, choose a filling: Options range from gyro-style meat sliced from the spit; tandoori-cooked chicken, beef or pork; or vegetarian picks of portobello mushrooms or falafel. Top it off with fresh fixings and a house-made sauce such as harissa or tahini. Besides a variety of hummus flavors served with pita chips, Tazé offers a dozen side dishes from baba ghanoush to stuffed grape leaves to an Israeli couscous salad. If you come after 4 p.m., make a meal out of happy hour bites like meatballs with tzatziki and skewered shrimp paired with a pint of local craft beer or a glass of wine. Finish with a Moroccan cookie, a chewy sugar cookie that holds a hint of the North African spice blend ras al-hanout.

 

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3. O’Fallon Brewery: 45 Progress Parkway, Maryland Heights, 636.474.2337, ofallonbrewery.com 

O’Fallon Brewery, among the area’s first craft breweries, has always lacked one crucial element: a tasting room for fans to gather, sample and enjoy. Now in its 15th year, O’Fallon has finally taken the next step – and it’s a big one. The new 40,000-square-foot brewery is full of glass walls and sleek, modern lines befitting its new home in a sea of industrial office complexes near Westport Plaza. In the tasting room, called the O’Bar Grill and Tap Room, 20 taps offer favorites like Zeke’s Pale Ale and Kite Tail. Order a pint or sample a few in a flight of four 5-ounce pours. Food portions are perfect for a lunch or happy-hour crowd; the sauceless baby back ribs are served four bones to an order, each dry-rubbed then grilled and basted with O’Fallon’s Golden Ale for a crispy, flavorful bite. Lighter fare is available, too, like the harvest salad with fresh berries, candied almonds and a Wheach vinaigrette or the grilled beer lime shrimp whose zing comes from marinating in 5-Day IPA, soy sauce and lime juice.

 

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4. Cellar House: 6039 Telegraph Road, Oakville, 314.846.5100, Facebook: Cellar House

South County residents, take note: Date night just got a whole lot closer to home. Cellar House, the companion restaurant connected to Oakville bottle shop Bottle Cellars, boasts an expansive bar program with 240 bottles of wine (and another 20 by-the-glass options), nearly 30 craft brews and a full spirits selection with 45 whiskey options, plus a cocktail menu. Many mixed drinks feature house-infused syrups and liqueurs, like the My Sherry Baby, which combines bourbon, sherry, vermouth and house-made orange-fig syrup before seeing a float of Cointreau. Sharable dishes dominate the menu. We savored the spicy heat of the nduja flatbread, which covers the hot sausage paste with a layer of thinly sliced pears, crunchy pistachios, crumbled blue cheese and a drizzle of honey. Cellar House also offers a trio of juicy free-range bison sliders topped with Marcoot Tipsy Cheddar and a generous smear of house-made tomato-bacon jam.

 

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5. Saint Louis Hop Shop: 2606 Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314.261.4011, saintlouishopshop.com

A craft beer bottle shop has opened on ever-growing, ever-diverse Cherokee Street. While Saint Louis Hop Shop’s selection of national craft labels is increasing daily, local suds currently dominate the shelves. Among the more than 70 different beers and ciders, you’ll find all the usual suspects from The Lou – 4 Hands, Crown Valley, Perennial, Schlafly, Urban Chestnut and more. Bottled and canned beer is available off-the-shelf or cold from the coolers, and the shop allows – even encourages – the adventurous thirsty to mix and match, creating their own six-packs. While you ponder which suds to bring home, sip beer from one of the four taps behind a bar fashioned by local woodworking boutique Mwanzi. The tasting bar features a rotating selection that includes brews from Civil Life and Modern Brewery.

-Saint Louis Hop Shop photo by Meera Nagarajan, all others by Michelle Volansky 

The Scoop: Beer bottle shop to open on Cherokee Street

Friday, May 1st, 2015

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There’s no shortage of places on Cherokee Street to kick back with a beer or cocktail, but stopping to pick up a six-pack of craft brews on the way home is a bit of a challenge. Co-owners Justin Harris and Ryan Griffin aim to change that when they open Saint Louis Hop Shop at 2606 Cherokee St., this month, as reported by St. Louis Magazine.

A longtime craft beer enthusiast, Harris said that Saint Louis Hop Shop shop will supply St. Louisans with a wide selection of canned and bottled brews from local favorites like 4 Hands, Schlafly and Urban Chestnut. “We want to get as many (beers) from the city as we can,” he said. “We’re looking for something from everyone that does … bottling or canning.” Harris also wants to bring in a selection of national and international craft brews.

The 850-square-foot shop will also have a small tasting area with four taps, enabling customers to sample beer from breweries who don’t bottle, like The Civil Life and Modern Brewing. “We didn’t really want a huge space,” Harris said. “We wanted somewhere that was small, but gave us room to grow into. As we expand our selection, we can make sure we always have the freshest beer available to our customers.”

The duo chose Cherokee Street as home to Hop Shop because of its location in St. Louis city, as well as the vibrant cultural scene and cooperation among business owners in the neighborhood. “Cherokee (has) a different vibe. (It) is so authentic, and so much culture,” he said. “Everybody is so willing to work with each other and help each other out.”

 

 

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