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Nov 20, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Posts Tagged ‘s’mores’

Eat This: Campfire S’mores Nitro Ice at Ices Plain & Fancy

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

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Bonfire season lives on in the Campfire S’mores Nitro Ice at Ices Plain & Fancy. Toasted marshmallow ice cream is whipped into a frenzy within a haze of liquid nitrogen, then swathed in house-made hot fudge and pierced with graham cracker and Hershey’s chocolate pieces. But what takes this seasonal sundae to the next level is the smoke captured under the lid of the serving cup. Pop the top, release that campfire smoke and dig in to the coolest, creamiest s’more in town.

-photo by Carmen Troesser

Baked: S’more Pie with Marshmallow Meringue

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

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I made this pie for Thanksgiving, and it was the hit dessert of the night. People were fighting over the last slice, which is the best compliment a baker can receive.

The crust is a simple graham cracker and butter base, although the recipe fits snugly into a prebaked graham cracker crust if you want to skip that fuss. The chocolate filling is to die for. It melts in your mouth and is similar to a ganache. You can make it days in advance; the filling holds up well in the refrigerator and doesn’t get too hard.

The topping is a meringue-marshmallow combination, which should be made and applied just before serving. The marshmallow fluff brings it closer to the actual s’mores flavor instead of a traditional meringue topping found on citrus pies. And of course, torching the top before serving looks gorgeous and adds a hint of smoky campfire goodness. Although it takes three components and a bit of effort, the payoff is well worth it. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

S’more Pie with Marshmallow Meringue
Adapted from a Smitten Kitchen recipe
Makes 1 9-inch pie

5 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
1½ cups graham cracker crumbs
¼ cup 2 Tbsp. plus sugar, divided
¼ tsp. kosher salt, divided
1 cup heavy cream
7 oz. fine-quality bittersweet chocolate, chopped
1 large egg at room temperature
1 7-oz. jar Kraft Jet-puffed Marshmallow Creme
3 large egg whites

• Place an oven rack in the middle position and preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly butter or spray a 9-inch pie pan.
• Stir together the butter, graham cracker crumbs, 2 tablespoons sugar and 1/8 teaspoon salt in a bowl until combined. Press the mixture evenly on the bottom and up the sides of the pie pan. Bake 12 to 15 minutes, then cool to room temperature, at least 45 minutes.
• Meanwhile, in a heavy saucepan, bring the cream just to a boil over medium-high heat, then turn remove from the burner and add the chocolate. Let stand 1 minute, then gently whisk until the chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. Gently whisk in the egg until combined. Pour the mixture into the prepared crust.
• Cover the edges of pie with foil and bake 25 minutes, until the filling is just set and trembles slightly in center when gently shaken. Let the pie cool to room temperature on a rack (filling will firm as it cools), about 1 hour.
• Position a rack in the top third of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees.
• Using rubber spatula, scrape the marshmallow creme into large bowl. Set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites and remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt in another large bowl until foamy. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, and beat until stiff and glossy peaks form.
• Add ½ cup beaten egg whites to the marshmallow creme and fold with a rubber spatula or spoon just until incorporated to lighten (marshmallow creme is very sticky and will be difficult to blend at first, but it will become easier as remaining whites are folded in). Fold in the remaining whites in 2 additions just until incorporated. Spread the meringue over top of pie, mounding slightly in center and swirling with knife to create peaks.
• Bake just until the peaks and ridges of marshmallow meringue are lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Let stand at room temperature until meringue is cool. Serve immediately. The pie will keep up to 4 days, refrigerated, before adding the meringue topping.

By the Book: Allison Kave’s S’more Pie

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

 

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I think there is something daunting about making a pie, especially one with a fruit filling, which is why I don’t make them. I have made exactly one pie in my life. It was an apple pie, and while it was great, it took a lot of time. Honestly, I’d rather someone else do the work, and I enjoy the results.

 

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So for my second attempt at pie-making, I decided to avoid the fruit altogether (even though this is the perfect season for a fruit pie) and go the chocolate route with a S’mores Pie out of Allison Kave’s book First Prize Pies: Shoo-fly, Candy Apple & Other Deliciously Inventive Pies for Every Week of the Year (and More). Kave offers a ton of interesting recipes in her book: grasshopper pie, a Nutella pie, even an avocado cream pie. But there’s nothing like the allure of a s’more: sweet, messy and a hallmark of childhood.

 

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A simple graham cracker crust, a chocolate ganache and a burnished marshmallow topping was easy enough. Kave includes an actual marshmallow fluff recipe, but thankfully she gave me an out when she noted that you could skip the whole mess and just top your pie with store-bought marshmallows. Not every recipe in the book has step-by-step photos, but this recipe did, which came in handy when I thought my ganache looked too thin.

 

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S’mores are sweet, as is this pie, but it’s a grown-up, fancy version of the original treat you loved as a kid. That’s reason enough to make it.

 

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S’more Pie
Makes 1 9-inch pie

Graham cracker crust (Recipe follows.)

Filling
1 cup heavy cream
8 oz. high-quality milk chocolate, chopped or chips
1 large egg, at room temperature
¼ tsp. salt

Topping
1 Tbsp. unflavored gelatin
2 cups sugar
2/3 cup light corn syrup
1 tsp. vanilla extract

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Make the filling: In a saucepan, heat the cream over medium-high heat until it is scalded. Pour it over the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and let it stand 1 minute. Whisk it thoroughly until combined into a glossy ganache. Whisk in the egg and salt until fully incorporated.
• Put the crust on a baking sheet. Pour the chocolate filling into the crust and bake it 20 to 25 minutes, until the filling has just set and is still slightly wobbly in the center. Remove the pie to cool completely.
• Make the topping: In the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large heatproof bowl, sprinkle the gelatin evenly over 2/3 cup water.
• In a clean, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup and another 2/3 cup water. Cook the sugar mixture over medium-high heat, stirring only at the beginning to dissolve the sugar, and boil it until a candy thermometer reaches the hard-ball stage (260 degrees). When the sugar is close to reaching this stage, turn on the stand mixer with the softened gelatin (or quickly beat the gelatin in your bowl to blend).
• Once you’ve reached the right temperature, turn on the stand or hand mixer to low speed, and slowly pour the hot syrup in a steady stream into the gelatin while mixing. Try to avoid the sides of the bowl and aim for the space between the beater and the side. When all of the syrup is in, increase the speed gradually to high to avoid splashing, and continue to beat until the mixture is very thick and has tripled in volume, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the vanilla, beat 1 minute more, and then pour the topping over the pie. It will slowly spread to cover the surface or you can use a spatula to spread it.
• Allow the topping to cool at room temperature or in the fridge until it has set, about 30 minutes. If you are using a torch (the preferred method), make sure the area you are working in is clear of any plastic, paper or other flammable items, and that the surface you are working on is fireproof (steel, marble, etc.). You can put a baking sheet under the pie to protect your countertops. Light the torch and start to lightly toast the surface of the pie, going darker or lighter according to your preference (I like my marshmallow pretty scorched, but that’s me!). When the pie is perfectly bruleed, turn off the torch and allow the pie to cool 10 minutes.
• If you are torch-less, you can do this in the broiler, but keep a close eye, as it requires patience, watchfulness and speed. Preheat your broiler, put the pie on a baking sheet, and use foil or a pie shield to cover the crust edges. Broil the pie about 3 inches from the heat source, rotating the pie for even toasting, until the topping is at your desired color. It burns very easily with this method, so watch closely! It’s best to keep the oven door cracked open and watch and rotate the whole time. Remove the pie and allow it cool at least 10 minutes.
• Your pie is now ready to serve, or you can keep it in the fridge up to 1 week. To cover, spray foil or plastic wrap very lightly with oil spray to prevent it from sticking to the topping. For easier slicing, run your knife until hot water first to prevent the marshmallow from sticking to the blade.

Graham Cracker Crust
Makes 1 9-inch pie crust

1½ cups finely ground graham cracker crumbs
5 to 8 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Crumble the graham crackers into the work bowl of a food processor and process until finely ground. Alternatively, you can put them in a bag and whack them with a rolling pin until finely crushed. Pour the butter into the crumbs and mix (hands are best for this) until the butter is fully incorporated and the texture is that of wet sand. Firmly press the crumbs against the sides of a 9-inch pie pan, then against the bottom of the pan (the underside of a measuring cup works well for smoothing the bottom crust). Chill the crust for at least 15 minutes to help prevent it from crumbling when serving.
• Bake the crust 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove it and allow it to cool before filling.

Reprinted with permission from Stewart, Tabori and Chang.

What’s your favorite s’more making memory? Tell us about it below for a chance to win a copy of First Prize Pies. We’ll email the winner!

 

By The Book: Helen Fletcher’s S’mores Tart

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

For the second book in our local cookbook series, I baked from Helen Fletcher’s European Tarts: Pastries Like a Pro; Divinely Doable Desserts with Little or No Baking. During an interview with Fletcher, who was featured in February’s Cook’s Books, she impressed me with her kindness and humility; but what really wowed me was her resume. When I was assigned her book, written by a woman who bakes pastries for Tony’s and is basically St. Louis’ version of Julia Child, I figured me and my kitchen were in for some failures.

Boy was I wrong. This recipe for the S’mores Tart literally took me six minutes to make. Granted, I cheated by buying a graham cracker crust (rather than making my own with Fletcher’s recipe), yet, even if I made it, this would still be an easy recipe.



And if it hadn’t been easy (some of her other recipes look more challenging), she includes links to the book’s website for how-to photographs. Not only did Fletcher hold true to her cookbook’s promise that this was a “divinely doable dessert with little or no baking,” the dessert tasted decadent and delicious.



I mean, marshmallows, heavy cream, chocolate and peanuts? This couldn’t have tasted bad.



My only concern? Fletcher claims that the pie serves 10 to 12. Fletcher might want to add a note there – “Pie serves 10 to 12 if you don’t allow yourself to stand in front of your open fridge with a fork in hand in the middle of the night. In that case, pie serves three.” 

S’mores Tart
10 to 12 servings

A true delight for young or old, this is quickly made and quickly eaten! I have been told that s’mores don’t have nuts in them. All I can say is, mine does!

Plain Graham Cracker Crumb Crust (recipe follows)
¾ cup, whole, shelled peanuts (85 g. or 3 oz.)
2 cups mini-marshmallows (85 g. or 3 oz.)
1 cup 40% cream (heavy cream)
12 oz. milk chocolate (340 g.)

• First, make the crust.
• Place the peanuts and marshmallows evenly in the crust. Set aside.
• Bring the cream to a boil, submerge the chocolate, and set aside for 5 minutes.
• Stir to melt the chocolate, whisking to smooth completely. Pour over the peanuts and marshmallows, which will rise to the top. Chill to set. Release.

9-inch Graham Cracker Crumb Crust

½ cup unsifted powdered sugar (55 g. or 2 oz.)
1 1/3 cups graham cracker crumbs (buy them in crumbs or run the crackers through a food processor) (170 g. or 6 oz.)
8 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted (114 g. or 4 oz.)
½ tsp. vanilla
1 quiche pan

• Sift the powdered sugar into a bowl. Add the crumbs, mixing well. Add the butter and vanilla and toss with a fork until the crumbs are completely coated.
• Spray the bottom of the quiche pan and press 2/3 of the crumbs (200 g. or 7 oz.) evenly over the bottom of the pan. Distribute the crumbs evenly against the sides. Press firmly against the sides.
• Add the remainder (160 g. or 5 2/3 oz.) to the bottom of the pan and press firmly.

What’s your favorite no-bake dessert and why? Tell us about it in the comments section below for a chance to win a signed copy of European Tarts: Pastries Like a Pro; Divinely Doable Desserts with Little or No Baking. We’ll announce the winner in next week’s By the Book column.

And now, we’d like to congratulate Jason whose comment on last week’s By the Book has won him a copy of Sanctuaria: The Dive Bar of Cocktail Bars. Jason, keep an eye out for an email from the Sauce crew. 

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