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Oct 22, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Posts Tagged ‘Thanksgiving’

Recipe: Parsnip-Carrot Puree

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

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This recipe was inspired by a parsnip side my husband ordered recently at The Crow’s Nest in Maplewood. When I told the owner how fantastic it was, she told me it would soon be off the menu, which meant it was even more important that I figure out how replicate it at home.

This dish will be prominently featured at our Thanksgiving table this year. I added carrots to the parsnips for a little color (and the whole “you never see rabbits wearing glasses” thing). I love this dish served silky smooth, but I respect that some people prefer a little texture in their mashes. You do you, Boo.

 

Peppery Parsnip-Carrot Puree
Inspired by a recipe from The Crow’s Nest
4 servings

2 cups (about 1 lb.) peeled, chopped parsnips
1 cup (about ½ lb.) peeled, chopped carrots
1 cup whole milk
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. butter
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. white pepper

• Place the parsnips, carrots, milk and garlic in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and slowly bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 8 minutes, until the vegetables are easily pierced with a fork.
• Carefully pour the vegetables and milk into a blender or bowl of a food processor fitted with the S-blade. Add the butter, black pepper, salt and white pepper and puree until the mixture reaches the desired smoothness. Adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Drink This Weekend Edition: 3 Big Black Friday Beers

Friday, November 25th, 2016

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All the Turkey Day leftovers are stored in the fridge, a big pot of turkey stock is simmering on the stove, and you’re contemplating joining in the Black Friday insanity. Or you’re like me: anti-turkey and thus, anti-turkey stock, and more likely to avoid any mall or retail establishment without a strong drink present.

I fully endorse celebrating Black Friday with massive, full-bodied, aggressive Imperial stouts and then perusing the interwebs for fun holiday gifts. Here, three such options to toast a successful Turkey Day and a very happy Black Friday.

Disclaimer: These three options are highly sought after and may be difficult to locate – but for many, this is part of the fun. All three will be available in bottles and draft around the city. Might I suggest a Schlafly Coffee Stout to get the search going?

 

1. Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout 2016 (13.8 percent ABV)
For most beer fans, this gnarly bourbon barrel-aged Imperial stout is the reason for the season. BCBS is chewy, sweet and showcases just enough boozy warmth to keep those toes warm in the coldest weather. Her debut on Black Friday gets those beer nerds out of bed in the wee hours of the morning to start prowling store shelves. Look for deep notes of chocolate and barrel undertones of charred oak, vanilla and smoke.

2. Perennial Abraxas (10 percent ABV)
Now that Perennial’s Abraxas Week and accompanying bottle release is over, it’s time to scour the city for bottles and draft. This Imperial stout is bitter, full-bodied and stacked with roasted malt notes and Mexican spice. The dance of the ancho chile peppers, cacao nibs and cinnamon sticks on the palate is the star of this belly warmer.

3. North Coast Barrel-Aged Old Rasputin XIX (11.2 percent ABV)
In true Russian Imperial stout fashion, this lady comes forth with a boatload of roasted malt that presents itself as espresso and chocolate on the palate. Throw in some dried fruit and lingering char and vanilla from the barrel as it warms, and you have yourself a good time.

Make This: Leftover Turkey Cuban

Monday, November 21st, 2016

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Leftover Thanksgiving turkey can seem endless – until you press it into this modified Cuban sandwich. Slice a telera or other soft sandwich roll in half lengthwise. On one half, spread 1 tablespoon each yellow mustard and cranberry sauce. Top with 1 slice baby Swiss cheese, 5 to 7 bread-and-butter pickles and 2 ounces each leftover turkey and sliced ham. Cover with the other half of the roll. Place the sandwich in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Press down with another heavy pan 2 minutes, then flip the sandwich, press down with the pan and cook 2 more minutes, until the cheese is melted.

Baked: Leftover Cranberry Tart

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

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There are lots of ways to use up Thanksgiving leftovers, but that container of cranberry sauce can seem never-ending. Here’s a sweet treat to use up the rest of that tart side. A crusty, almost cookie-like Italian cake is scented with cinnamon and ginger and baked with cranberry sauce over the top. If you’re in the mood for sweet and savory, lay some brie on top before it goes into the oven. Enjoy and happy baking!

 

Cranberry Tart
Adapted from a recipe from Nigella Lawson’s How to be a Domestic Goddess
Makes 1 9-inch tart

2 eggs, room temperature
½ cup sugar
6 Tbsp. butter, softened
1 1/3 cup cake flour
Pinch salt
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. ground ginger
½ tsp. cinnamon
¾ cup cranberry sauce or relish

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9-inch tart pan with nonstick spray and set aside.
• In a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs with an electric mixer on high speed. Add the sugar and beat until fluffy. Add the butter, cake flour, salt, baking powder and ginger and cinnamon and mix with a spatula until combined.
• Spread the dough in the tart pan, pressing it up the sides (It will be sticky.). Spoon the cranberry sauce into the center of the pan, leaving a 1-inch border around the edge.
• Bake 35 to 45 minutes, until the edges are golden brown. Serve warm or at room temperature. The tart will keep in an airtight container up to 3 days.

Cooking the Classics: Old-Fashioned

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

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A classic Old-Fashioned is the granddaddy of whiskey cocktails. The simple, time-honored trio of whiskey, bitters and sugar is best complemented by the natural sweetness of cherry and fresh orange. Dustin Parres, corporate bar manager at Gamlin Whiskey House, contended that technique makes the Old-Fashioned so special – something often ignored by bartenders who slap the drink together using bottled juices and bland, mass-produced cherries. “If they aren’t breaking out a muddler, you know that they’re doing it wrong,” Parres said. Check out his take on the classic.

 

Old-Fashioned
Courtesy of Gamlin Whiskey House’s Dustin Parres
1 serving

3 Luxardo maraschino cherries, divided
2 small orange slices, divided
1 Demerara sugar cube
A few dashes Angostura bitters
2 oz. Henry McKenna bottled-in-bond bourbon
½ oz. Dolin Blanc vermouth

• In a pint glass or shaker, muddle together 2 cherries, 1 orange slice, the sugar cube and bitters. Pour in the bourbon and the vermouth. Add a few ice cubes, cover and shake. Pour through a fine-mesh sieve into an Old-Fashioned glass, snifter or rocks glass filled with large ice cubes. Garnish with the remaining cherry and orange slice.

 

-photo by Greg Rannells

Cooking the Classics: Mashed Potatoes

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

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Nothing says love like a big bowl of mashed potatoes and gravy. Every family has its favorite rendition of this classic dish, and even the pros disagree about some things. Kevin Nashan, chef-owner of Peacemaker Lobster & Crab Co. and Sidney Street Cafe, prefers a rough mash of partially peeled, small red potatoes or fingerlings. Gerard Craft, chef-owner of Niche Food Group, goes for a smooth puree of russet potatoes. Nashan seasons his water; Craft doesn’t. But lumpy or whipped, fingerlings or russets, milk or cream, there are some things all good mashers can agree upon. Here, 6 steps to the perfect mash.

1. Cut about 3 pounds potatoes (such as russet, fingerling or small red potatoes) into equal 1½ – to 2-inch cubes.

2. Place those spuds in a very large pot of cold water and give them room to dance with 1 inch of water above them. Set the pot over medium-high heat.

3. Put a fork in it. Three pounds of potatoes cooked over medium-high take about 30 to 35 minutes. When a fork goes in easily or breaks the potato, drain immediately. If the potatoes fight back, continue to cook, checking every 5 minutes. Pay attention: Overcooked potatoes make a soupy mash.

4. Burn calories while you mash. The paddle attachment on a stand mixer works, but it is easy to go from perfection to glue when using appliances. Keep it old-school with a wire masher and leave some lumps, if you’re into that. If you like a silky-smooth texture, use a potato ricer.

5. Use about 1 stick melted butter and ½ cup milk, half-and-half or cream for every 3 pounds potatoes. Always warm the butter and liquid before adding them.

6. Don’t be bland. Add salt and white pepper to taste – start with 1 teaspoon salt and a couple grinds of pepper and go from there. Other additions may include roasted garlic, creme fraiche or sour cream and, of course, cheese. Try mascarpone, goat cheese, cheddar or Parmesan. You can also add a little chicken or beef stock diluted in warm milk.

Pro tip: Making your potatoes ahead of time? Hold them up to 4 hours in a slow cooker on low. Pour 2 tablespoons melted butter and ¼ cup warm milk into the slow cooker insert before adding the mashed potatoes, then cover. Stir well before serving.

-photo by Greg Rannells

Make This: White Turkey Chili

Friday, November 28th, 2014

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The guests are gone, the fine china is stowed away, and there’s a pile of leftover turkey in a Tupperware container. Don’t call it a day just yet! Break out the slow cooker to make a hearty White Turkey Chili for a Black Friday feast while you sleep off that Thanksgiving food coma. In a slow cooker, combine 2 to 3 cups chopped turkey, 3 cups cooked cannellini or Great Northern beans, 1 cup chopped onion, 1 cup frozen corn, 1 4.5-ounce can drained chopped green chiles, 2 minced garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon adobo sauce, 2 teaspoons ground cumin, 2 teaspoons chili powder and 1 teaspoon dried oregano. Add 4 cups chicken broth and stir. Cook on low for 5 to 6 hours. Stir in 6 ounces sour cream, adjust seasonings and serve with shredded cheddar cheese, chopped avocado, chopped cilantro and lime wedges.

 

-photo by Greg Rannells

Drink This Weekend Edition: I Don’t Want No Shrubs

Thursday, November 27th, 2014

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One of the most exciting things about creating cocktails is rediscovering old techniques and ingredients. Shrubs have been around since the Colonial period and were enjoyed by the likes of Benjamin Franklin and Martha Washington.

Consisting of vinegar, sugar and fruit, shrubs were originally used to preserve and incorporate fresh ingredients in the days before refrigeration. Now they add excellent flavor and dimension to cocktails. I Don’t Want No Shrubs combines a homemade apple shrub with rye whiskey, Benedictine and Velvet Falernum to create a sweet-yet-tangy, boozy, smooth drink that’s perfect to warm you on a chilly day – and it makes dealing with your crazy uncle just a little bit easier during the holidays.

 
I Don’t Want No Shrubs
1 serving

2 oz. Rittenhouse rye whiskey
½ oz. Benedictine
½ oz. Velvet Falernum
½ oz. apple shrub (recipe follows)
2 dashes Jerry Thomas Decanter Bitters
Orange twist to garnish

• Combine the whiskey, Benedictine, Velvet Falernum, apple shrub and bitters in a mixing glass with ice. Stir until cold and pour into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Apple Shrub

4 to 5 apples, cored and sliced
Sugar to coat
Apple cider vinegar

• Toss the apple slices in a bowl with enough sugar to coat. Cover and refrigerate 1 day.
• Strain the sugar syrup into a measuring cup. Reserve the sweetened apples for another use or discard. Add an equal amount of apple cider vinegar to the sugar syrup, pour into a resealable jar and let sit 1 day. Apple shrub will keep up to 1 year.

 

Drew Lucido is a member of USBG St. Louis and bar manager at Juniper.

Extra Sauce: 6 Thanksgiving recipes for gluten-free guests

Monday, November 24th, 2014

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The turkey usually isn’t a problem for your gluten-free guys and gals, but stuffing and rolls are definite no-gos. Welcome them with a starter of Apple Cheese Pleasers and make sure to have at least two sides they can enjoy with their bird.

 

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Dishes like Beet and Carrot Salad, Roasted Sweet Brussels Sprouts and Grapes or Butternut Squash Stew will satisfy all your guests with any dietary needs.

 

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And why pumpkin pie is a must on Thanksgiving, make sure your GF guests end on a sweet note, too, with Hold-the-Oatmeal Cranberry Cookies and Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies.

-photo by Greg Rannells

Meatless Monday: Vegan Green Bean Casserole

Monday, November 24th, 2014

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Your Thanksgiving green bean casserole can still hearken back to Aunt Susan’s classic recipe – without resorting to a pile of canned goods. Even vegans can enjoy this version, which subs creamed soup for puréed red potatoes and mushrooms that blanket fresh green beans in velvety goodness. And those fried onions you always stole from the top when no one was looking? We crisp up quinoa flakes and shallots to get that salty sweet crunch you know and love. Get the recipe here.

 

-photo by Carmen Troesser

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