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Oct 19, 2017
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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Recipe: Parsnip-Carrot Puree

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

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This recipe was inspired by a parsnip side my husband ordered recently at The Crow’s Nest in Maplewood. When I told the owner how fantastic it was, she told me it would soon be off the menu, which meant it was even more important that I figure out how replicate it at home.

This dish will be prominently featured at our Thanksgiving table this year. I added carrots to the parsnips for a little color (and the whole “you never see rabbits wearing glasses” thing). I love this dish served silky smooth, but I respect that some people prefer a little texture in their mashes. You do you, Boo.

 

Peppery Parsnip-Carrot Puree
Inspired by a recipe from The Crow’s Nest
4 servings

2 cups (about 1 lb.) peeled, chopped parsnips
1 cup (about ½ lb.) peeled, chopped carrots
1 cup whole milk
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. butter
½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. white pepper

• Place the parsnips, carrots, milk and garlic in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and slowly bring it to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer 8 minutes, until the vegetables are easily pierced with a fork.
• Carefully pour the vegetables and milk into a blender or bowl of a food processor fitted with the S-blade. Add the butter, black pepper, salt and white pepper and puree until the mixture reaches the desired smoothness. Adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Cider Pulled Pork

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Recipe: Cider Pulled Pork

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

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October is a month of seasonal limbo is St. Louis. Summer is technically over, and fall is flirting with us. I know I still have good garden-fresh tomatoes, but I also kind of want stew. This is a good time for pulled pork. Its starring role in backyard barbecues across St. Louis helps me hold on to summer, while the combination of apple cider, maple syrup and the warm spices in harissa fulfills my need for flannel-wearin’ food. Serve it alongside mashed potatoes or with polenta on a cooler day, or if the sun’s out, between a bun with coleslaw.

 

Cider Pulled Pork
6 to 8 servings

6 lb. bone-in pork shoulder
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
3 cups apple cider, divided
¾ cup maple syrup, divided
3 Tbsp. Dijon mustard, divided
2 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. harissa paste, divided

• Preheat a large nonstick skillet over high heat.
• Liberally season the pork shoulder all over with salt and pepper. Sear the pork about 3 minutes per side until browned, then place in the insert of a slow cooker.
• In a bowl, whisk together 2 cups apple cider, ½ cup maple syrup, 2 tablespoons mustard and 2 tablespoons harissa. Pour it over the pork. Cover and cook on high 6 to 8 hours.
• Remove the bone from the meat and discard. Skim the excess fat from the surface of the cooking liquid and discard or reserve for another use. Use forks to shred the meat, then cover and cook on low 20 to 30 minutes.
• Meanwhile, make the glaze. In a saucepot over medium-high heat, bring the remaining 1 cup cider and the remaining ¼ cup maple syrup to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Simmer at least 20 minutes, swirling the contents of the pot occasionally, until it begins to thicken. Whisk in the remaining 1 tablespoon mustard and 1 teaspoon harissa paste.
• Place the pulled pork on a serving platter, leaving most of the liquid behind. Serve the pork drizzled with the glaze.

 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Make This: Fennel and Carrot Gratin

Monday, October 2nd, 2017

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The trick to a great gratin is uniformly sliced vegetables. Spend minimal time and energy by prepping this fantastic sweet and savory side dish with a mandoline.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Use a mandoline to cut 3 fennel bulbs horizontally and 3 peeled large carrots diagonally into ¼-inch slices.

In an oiled shallow baking dish, layer a third of the fennel, then half of the carrots. Season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon orange zest. Top with another third of the fennel, the remaining carrots, more salt and pepper, then the remaining fennel.

Sprinkle the top with ½ cup freshly grated pecorino, ⅓ cup panko breadcrumbs and 2 tablespoons fresh thyme. Drizzle with olive oil and bake until the vegetables are tender and the top is golden brown, a little more than 1 hour. Garnish with chopped fennel fronds. Serve hot or at room temperature.

Photo by Julia Calleo

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Just Five. 

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Recipe: Peach-Bourbon Milkshake

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

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Boozy milkshakes are a fun, trendy dessert option. Peaches and bourbon are a great combination, and that left me with a fun “free” fifth ingredient to choose. Mint? Vanilla or almond extract? My decision was made for me when I realized the rock-hard peaches I picked up the previous day hadn’t quite achieved perfectly ripe lusciousness. I needed to coax out some flavor and juice, so I brought out the butter and sugar.

 I decided that if I was going to add butter to a milkshake (insert OMG emoji here), that I may as well go all in. That means this butter is browned, my dears, and it makes all the difference. If you’re catering to teetotaling friends or family members, the bourbon can be poured in after you make the shake.

Peach-Bourbon Milkshake
4 small or 2 large servings

2 large peaches or 3 medium peaches, ripe or just underripe
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
¼ cup brown sugar
5-6 scoops high-quality vanilla ice cream, plus more as needed
½ cup whole milk, plus more as needed
4 oz. bourbon

• Bring a medium saucepan filled with water to a rolling boil over high heat. Prepare an ice bath.
• Slice a small X into the bottom of the peaches with a sharp knife, then place them in the boiling water 45 seconds to 1 minute until the skin just starts to pull away from the X. Remove and immediately plunge them into the ice water bath. Starting at the X, peel the peaches, then pit, slice and set aside.
• Place the butter in a large skillet and melt over medium heat. Gently swirl the pan until the solids just start to turn brown and the butter smells nutty.
• Add the peaches and brown sugar and stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and saute the peaches 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is saucy. Remove from heat and let cool at least 30 minutes.
• In the pitcher of a blender, combine the peach mixture and all its sauce, ice cream, milk and bourbon. Cover and puree until completely blended, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Add ice cream or milk to reach the desired consistency.

 

Photo by Michelle Volansky 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Harissa Chicken

Friday, September 8th, 2017

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Using yogurt as a marinade is a great way to keep chicken tender and juicy. Like buttermilk, the acid in a dairy marinade actually tenderizes the meat and imparts its slightly tart taste to the chicken. Spicy harissa is tempered by the dairy and brightened by the lemon zest. Harissa can be found at most international food stores like Global Foods Market, Jay’s International Foods or United Provisions, but a decent substitute can be yours with just five ingredients. It’s not as complex as what you’ll find at the store, but it saved me an extra trip on a busy day.

 

Harissa Chicken
4 servings

½ cup plain Greek yogurt
2 to 4 Tbsp. harissa paste (Optional recipe follows.)
Zest and juice of 1 small lemon
1 tsp. kosher salt
½ cup olive oil
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs or drumsticks
¼ cup torn mint leaves

• In a mixing bowl, whisk together the yogurt, harissa, lemon juice and zest and salt, then whisk in the olive oil.
• Place the chicken in a large zip-top bag and add the yogurt marinade. Seal the bag and massage the chicken to completely coat. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes or overnight.
• Prepare a charcoal or gas grill for medium-high, direct heat.
• Grill the chicken skin side-down 3 to 4 minutes, then flip and cook another 3 to 4 minutes, until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat reaches 160 degrees.
• Arrange the chicken on a serving platter and immediately top with the mint so the heat releases the oils.

 

Quick Harissa Paste
1/3 cup

5 to 6 garlic cloves, minced
5 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1½ Tbsp. smoked paprika
2 tsp. coriander
1 tsp. red pepper flakes
½ tsp. kosher salt

• Combine all the ingredients in a glass bowl and microwave 15 to 30 seconds, until fragrant. Whisk to combine and let cool. Store refrigerated in a sealed jar.

 

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Friday, September 1st, 2017

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Named for Livorno, Italy, this flavorful stovetop dish is perfect when summer’s heat still lingers, but there’s less time for leisurely cooking.

In a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, saute 2 cups chopped tomatoes, ½ cup chopped kalamata olives, ½ cup chopped red onion, ¼ cup chopped capers, 2 cloves minced garlic and ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes in 3 tablespoons olive oil until fragrant, about 4 minutes.

Push the tomato mixture to the edges of the skillet and add 4 trout fillets. Squeeze half a lemon over the fish, cover and cook 4 minutes.

Plate the fish and top with the tomato mixture and chopped parsley. Garnish with lemon wedges if desired and serve with toasted bread, rice or couscous.

Photo by Julia Calleo

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who regularly pens Just Five

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Recipe: Eggplant and Tomato Bruschetta

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

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What else is there to say about a late-summer tomato? There is nothing that can touch its flavor, and there is little reason to do more than throw slices on bread with salt and pepper and inhale them.

Ah, bread. My other love. Specifically, Mr. Meowski’s sourdough bread. My daughters refer to Mr. Meowski as “mom’s boyfriend,” and I don’t correct them. This bread has limited availability, but you can be darn sure I know how to find it: most days at Larder & Cupboard, Roger’s Produce, Local Harvest Grocery, City Greens Market, Freddie’s Market and Saturdays at Tower Grove Farmers’ Market.

Eggplant hasn’t ever done much for me, but I’ve started to experiment with different varieties. I’m a fan of the long, skinny Asian eggplants, as opposed to the stout globe ones found in most groceries. I find Japanese and Chinese eggplants to be less bitter with a more enjoyable texture, and roasting them brings out an almost floral quality.

If one were to gild the lily on this perfect late-summer dish, it would be with a few splashes of balsamic or red wine vinegar.

Eggplant and Tomato Bruschetta
8 servings

2 Japanese or Chinese eggplants, peeled and sliced ¼-inch thick
1 to 2 Tbsp. olive oil
8 ¾-inch slices sourdough or pain de beaucaire, toasted
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
8 oz. goat cheese crumbles or feta cheese
3 to 4 medium ripe tomatoes, cut into ½-inch slices
4 Tbsp. chopped fresh marjoram

• Preheat the broiler.
• In a mixing bowl, toss the eggplant with the olive oil and place in an even layer on a foil lined-baking sheet. Broil 5 minutes, until the eggplant starts to brown.
• Evenly divide the roasted eggplant atop the toast. Season with salt and pepper, then sprinkle each slice with 1 ounce cheese. Broil 2 to 3 minutes.
• Place the tomato atop the toast, then garnish with the marjoram. Serve immediately.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine who also pens Make This

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Recipe: Frozen Pimm’s Punch

Friday, August 11th, 2017

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There’s a month or two of sno-cone weather left – take advantage with a frozen riff on a favorite cocktail. Pimm’s is a highbrow British gin-based liqueur flavored with bitter herbs and citrus that you might find in fancy Wimbledon box. This recipe turns the original Pimm’s Cup into a summertime adult treat that goes down oh-so easy. Tallyho and pip-pip!

Frozen Pimm’s Punch
4 servings

3 cups lemonade, plus more to taste
1 cup chopped cucumber, peeled and seeded
1 cup strawberries, hulled
5 mint leaves
1 cup Pimm’s No. 1, plus more to taste

Special equipment: Ice cream maker*

• In a blender on high speed, combine the lemonade, cucumber, strawberries and mint for 30 seconds, until completely liquefied. Use a fine mesh sieve to strain the mixture into a large bowl. Press the solids with the back of a spoon to remove as much liquid as possible; discard the solids.
• Stir in the Pimm’s. Taste and adjust with more Pimm’s or lemonade as desired.
• Freeze in an ice cream maker 30 to 45 minutes, until the mixture reaches a slushie-like consistency.

* If you do not have an ice cream maker, pour the mixture into a shallow container and freeze 2 hours. Scrape the frozen edges towards the middle of the container, then refreeze, scraping and stirring every 30 minutes until the mixture reaches the desired consistency.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This

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Make This: Summer Berry & Rosemary Jam

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

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Gather ye berries while ye may for this simple, sweet jam.

Place 24 ounces total mixed blackberries, raspberries, blueberries and quartered strawberries in a large pot with 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons water and 1 tablespoon fresh chopped rosemary, then crush the berries with a potato masher.

Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon and scraping the bottom, until thickened, about 40 minutes.

Transfer the jam to sterile glass jars, leaving a little room at top, seal and let cool, then refrigerate.

Use within 3 weeks on toast with ricotta, served with cheese and crackers, as a decadent sauce on duck or pork, or freeze up to 6 months.

Photo by Julia Calleo

Just Five: Zucchini Carpaccio

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

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‘Tis the season for many friends to offer zucchini “free to a good home” on social media. I have such a home and jumped on a similar post, so I drove to Kirkwood to pick up quite possibly the largest zucc I’ve ever seen – more baseball bat than vegetable. Thanks to a recent lunch at Olio, it was destined for a home run (see what I did there?).

Olio’s zucchini carpaccio is made with preserved lemon and herb oil. With five ingredients at your disposal, there’s room to play here: add minced fresh herbs or try different nuts (toasted walnuts, hazelnuts or pepitas would be great). The trick is to thinly shave the zucchini with a decent vegetable peeler. This is a quintessential summer dish, perfect with some crusty bread and glass of white wine.

 

Zucchini Carpaccio
Inspired by a dish at Olio
4 to 6 servings

2 medium zucchini
1 tsp. kosher salt
2 Tbsp. lemon juice
1 tsp. lemon zest
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
½ cup shaved Parmesan or pecorino cheese
¼ cup toasted pine nuts
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
Drizzle of olive oil, for serving

• Trim the ends of the zucchini and use a vegetable peeler to shave them into thin ribbons, discarding the first and last peelings that are mostly skin.
• Toss the zucchini ribbons in a colander with the salt and let drain 30 minutes, tossing occasionally. Blot the zucchini dry with paper towels and layer them in a shallow baking dish.
• Tuck the garlic slices between the layers and sprinkle with the lemon juice and lemon zest. Cover with plastic and marinate at least 15 minutes.
• Remove and discard the garlic. Place the zucchini in a shallow serving bowl and top with Parmesan, pine nuts, pepper and a drizzle of olive oil immediately.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This. 

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