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Mar 23, 2017
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Intelligent Content For The Food Fascinated
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SERVING SAINT LOUIS SINCE 1999
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beer

Just Five: Guinness Beer Bread

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

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Luck of the Irish indeed! Sauce Magazine tips the hat to all things beer this month, and March also celebrates all things Irish. This month rocks!

I wondered how to make a Just Five recipe with beer as one of key ingredients. After a little research on beer bread and soda bread, I threw both recipes together, picked out the parts I liked, and hoped for the blessing of St. Honoratus of Amiens (Google him).

A note on this recipe: If you do not sift the flour, you’ll have a dry biscuit, not bread. Sift, sift, sift! This simple quick bread has a crunchy crust from baking in butter and a lovely sweetness from the beer and brown sugar, proving once again that beer makes it better.

 
Guinness Beer Bread
6 servings

3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
3 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. kosher salt
¼ cup packed brown sugar
1 Tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary
12 oz. Guinness or other dark beer
6 Tbsp. (¾ stick) unsalted butter, melted

• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
• In a large mixing bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder and salt. Break up the packed brown sugar with a fork, then add it and the rosemary and stir well to combine the dry ingredients. Add the beer and mix until a sticky dough forms.
• Spread the dough evenly into a cast-iron skillet or greased 9-by-9-inch baking dish and pour the melted butter over the dough. Bake 40 to 45 minutes.
• Let cool at least 15 minutes before serving. Bread will keep 4 to 5 days at room temperature in an airtight container.

Dee Ryan is a longtime contributor to Sauce Magazine and regularly pens Make This.

Photo by Michelle Volansky

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Sneak Peek: Two Plumbers Brewery & Arcade in St. Charles

Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

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Two Plumbers Brewery & Arcade officially opens doors this Saturday, March 18, at 2236 First Capitol Drive in St. Charles. As The Scoop reported in December 2016, Two Plumbers is the brainchild of owner Robert Schowengerdt and head brewer John Simon. “I was trying to figure out a way to make an arcade make money,” Schowengerdt said. “I know how to pour a beer and I knew this guy (Simon).”

The 21-and-older brewery will offer two of its beers at opening, the Ermac Irish Red IPA and Braunenmantel American brown ale. “All our beer names will be nerd references of some kind,” Schowengerdt said. Simon is hoping to add a honey blonde and a few other beers soon.

The bar has 10 taps supplemented by breweries like Logboat Brewing Co., Urban Chestnut Brewing Co., Schlafly and Great Divide Brewing Co., as well as one cider and a few wine options. Customers are welcome to bring in food, or order a Dan O’s frozen pizza from the bar. “We’re not complicated,” Schowengerdt said. “It’s pretty much just beer and video games.”

The 80-seat space includes more than 30 arcade games with classics like “Donkey Kong” and “Super Mario Bros.,” and old school favorites like “Dungeons & Dragons” and “Time Crisis II.”

Regular hours will be Tuesday to Friday from 4 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. and Saturday from noon to 1:30 a.m. Here’s a sneak peek at what to expect when doors open at St. Charles’ newest brewery:

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Photos by Michelle Volansky

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• Sauce Magazine: Guide to Beer 2017 

• Guide to Beer 2017: Class of 2017

The Scoop: Two Plumbers Brewery & Arcade to open in St. Charles

Guide to Beer 2017: One Glass to Rule Them All

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Different beers have their own styles of glassware for a reason, but few of us have enough space or money to buy a full portfolio of beer glasses. Keep things simple by enjoying your next brew in a wine glass. The standard shape – wider at the bottom and narrow at the top – helps focus aromatics, which will enhance your enjoyment of most styles, especially if you don’t fill it as high as Tammy Taylor.

2nd Shift Brewing Co. co-owner Libby Crider especially likes to use wine glasses for barrel-aged beers, which tend to be more delicate. “They’re great for beers you want to treat like wines,” she said. “You can swirl, aerate and really get the whole experience.”

 Photo by Jonathan Gayman

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Guide to Beer 2017: Get festive with STL beer fests

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Grab your calendar, prepare your liver and save the dates – St. Louis is awash in beer festivals this year.

FestivAle
March 4, Delmar Hall, St. Louis, festivalestl.com
More than 30 regional breweries descend on FestivAle from Point Labaddie Brewery to Charleville Brewery. Fill your glass, then grab bites from Wicked Greenz, Bogart’s Smokehouse and more. This event is sold out.

Schlafly Stout and Oyster Festival
March 10 and 11, Schlafly Tap Room, schlafly.com/stoutandoyster
Choose from 15 Schlafly stouts and a selection of small-batch, experimental options, then enter the Shuckerdome and watch pros battle it out, shucking oysters at lightning speed. Free admission.

Ales for Tails Homebrew Festival
March 25, American Czech Educational Center, St. Louis, stlpivo.com
Dozens of homebrewers share their concoctions to benefit local animal nonprofits alongside artisans selling handmade pet toys and cookies. Tickets available online.

Lupulin Carnival
April 1, Midway at Union Station, St. Louis, lupulincarnival.com
4 Hands Brewing brings down the War Hammer, its annual Imperial IPA. Take a turn on the Ferris wheel and super slide, and sip beers from 65 local and national breweries, including heavy-hitters like Toppling Goliath. Tickets available online.

Mile Marker 68.3 Bier Fest
April 29, Missouri Riverfront, Washington, Facebook: Mile Marker 68.3 Bier Fest
Friendship Brewing, Standard Brewing, Trailhead Brewing and more than 20 others come out to support Missouri River Relief. Not a beer fan? Sip samples from distilleries like Pinckney Bend and Wood Hat. Tickets available at John G’s Bierdeck or online.

St. Louis Microfest
May 5 and 6, Forest Park, St. Louis, stlmicrofest.org
This two-day festival has three sessions to sample around 125 international and craft breweries like 4204 Main Street Brewing. Tickets available online.

Indihop
May 20, The Grove and Cherokee Street, indihopstl.com
Shuttle between two of St. Louis’ more eclectic neighborhoods and taste up to 50 local beers at participating shops, bars and breweries. Tickets available online.

Heritage Festival
June 3, Gateway Arch, St. Louis, stlbeer.org
Sample more than 100 brews from members of the St. Louis Brewers Guild and end your evening with fireworks above the Arch. Tickets will be available online.

St. Louis Craft Beer Week
July 28 to Aug. 5, St. Louis, stlbeerweek.com
This ninth annual festival spans the city and county with more than 100 events including the Midwest Belgian Beer Fest, tap takeovers, classes and beer dinners. Schedule and tickets will be available online.

Schlafly Hop in the City
Sept. 16, Schlafly Tap Room, St. Louis, schlafly.com/hop
Hop to Schlafly Tap Room to sample nearly all Schlafly’s extensive portfolio, including special-release brews. Tickets will be available online.

Augusta Bottoms Beer Festival
Oct. 7, Augusta, augustabottomsbeerfest.com
It’s a party on the flood plains at Augusta Brewing Co.’s annual festival. Last year’s event included nearly 40 breweries. Tickets available online.

St. Louis Brewers Guild Halloween Party
Oct. 28, Lafayette Park, St. Louis, stlbeer.org
Don your favorite costume and trick or treat with St. Louis brewers. Previous years’ festivities included a costume contest and a Hefe Ride (a hayride with a keg). Tickets will be available online.

The Great St. Louis Czech Beer Festival
Dec. 9, American Czech Educational Center, St. Louis, stlpivo.com
Last year, nearly two dozen breweries offered their iterations of the Czech Pilsner at this celebration of the clean lager style. Tickets will be available online.

 

Editor’s note: At the time of publication, tickets were still available for FestivAle. It has since sold out. The online version of this article has been updated with the most current information. 

Catherine Klene and Brianna Velarde contributed to this article. 

Illustration by Vidhya Nagarajan

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Guide to Beer 2017: Class of 2017

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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The St. Louis beer scene is always expanding, but with a dozen breweries slated to open this year, we’re entering a new beer boom. Meet the St. Louis brewers’ Class of 2017.

Top row from left: Greer Brewing Co. brewer-co-owner Chris Greer, Greer Brewing co-owner Becky Greer, Two Plumbers Brewery & Arcade head brewer John Simon, Wellspent brewer-co-owner Kyle Kohlmorgen, Good News Brewing Co. brewer-co-owner Josh Miller,Steampunk Brew Works brewer-owner David Deaton

Middle row from left: Rockwell Beer Co. brewer-owner Andy Hille, Design2Brew head brewer Donn Christian, Third Wheel Brewing head brewer Abbey Spencer, Missouri Beer Co. brewer-co-owner Dave Johnson, Good News Brewing Co. brewer-co-owner Dan Tripp

Bottom row from left: White Rooster Farmhouse Brewery brewer-co-owner Mike Deutschmann, Senn Bierwerks brewer-co-owner Dustin Chalfant, Center Ice Brewery brewer-owner Steve Albers, Senn brewer-co-owner James Hellmuth

 

Photo by Ashley Gieseking 

Guide to Beer 2017: Where Brewers Drink

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Brewers can drink their own beer all day. Here’s where they go when they’re off duty.

With a big group
“We like Basso or Three Kings in The Loop. We live in U. City, so Three Kings is usually where we’ll go with friends.” – Ryan Sherring, Six Mile Bridge brewmaster-co-owner

Neighborhood spot
Frailey’s Southtown Grill in South County. I know the owners – it’s more of a regular’s place. … For what you get, I think it’s the best bang for buck in St. Louis. And everyone who works there is great. It has that family feel to it.” – Brian Ilg, Kirkwood Station Brewing Company brewmaster

“My favorite spot would be Main Street in Edwardsville – there’s a couple good restaurants and bars. A go-to is Recess Brewing down there. It’s nice to have places within walking distance.” – Patrick Thirion, Peel Brewing Co. brewer-co-owner

Something other than beer
“This is probably going to be your weirdest answer, but my place is Pho Grand on South Grand to get their French iced coffee.” – Thirion

“If I want to get a decent whiskey, there’s a couple places I like to go: Montrey’s in Ferguson. It’s a cigar bar. It’s right by the brewhouse, so that one’s easy. And I enjoy Eclipse. You can get a decent drink, and it’s a cool atmosphere. And you can’t go wrong with Shaved Duck, or BBQ Saloon always has a good whiskey selection.” – Taylor Wright, Ferguson Brewing Co. head brewer

Day drinking
“For outside in summer, a great place is 21st Street Brewers Bar. Or Square One – they do a mean grilled cheese.” – Sherring

“Pretty much anywhere that has games – anywhere I can play bubble hockey, shuffleboard or darts. And iTap in Soulard is always a good day drinking spot because it’s not going to be overly busy – you can have good conversations.” – Wright

 

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Guide to Beer 2017: Whale Hunting

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Guide to Beer 2017: Whale Hunting

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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Beer nerds spend hours at bottle shops and grocery stores searching for new and trendy bottles to add to their collections. But some beers are so special, so elusive, they can make even the most mild-mannered beer enthusiast go Captain Ahab on local aisles. “The more rare or difficult it is to find, that’s what people refer to as a whale,” explained Ryan Nickelson, co-owner of Craft Beer Cellar. While Nickelson’s Clayton shop is stocked with brews from around the world, he sometimes receives just one case of a rare bottle. Here, Nickelson shared four tips for intrepid drinkers hell-bent on finding their own white whales.

1. Join the club. Many bottle shops have membership programs that reward participants with rare beers through raffles, special events and even allocations. Craft Beer Cellar also keeps some rare bottles on a cellar list for on-site consumption, so many can get a taste.

2. Follow the distributors, not just the beer. Distributors like Shelton Brothers will sometimes drop hints of what’s coming to the market. Nickelson also named beer blogs like The Beer Temple and Good Beer Hunting as prime resources.

3. Go to beer releases. Here is where you’ll find local whales highly coveted across the country, like Perennial Barrel-Aged Sump and Side Project Brewing bottles.

 4. Shop frequently. Nickelson said whales are sometimes announced with little fanfare. Successful hunters have sharp eyes.

 

If you stumble across these brews in stores, don’t think – just buy:

4 Hands Madagascar

Goose Island Rare Bourbon County Brand Stout

Cantillion Brewery beers

Firestone Walker Brewing Co. Proprietor’s Vintage Series

Avery Brewing Co. Barrel-Aged Series

Stone Brewing Small Batch Series

Illustration by Vidhya Nagarajan

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Guide to Beer 2017: Fresh to Death

Guide to Beer 2017: Spring Forecast

 

Guide to Beer 2017: Fresh to Death

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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It happened again. You let that half-empty jug of milk sit past its best-by date. Way past its best-by date. You remove the cap, take a cautious sniff … then retch and promptly chuck the whole thing in the trash.

While old beer doesn’t produce quite the same visceral reaction, bottling or drink-by dates should be given the same consideration. If you’ve ever ordered a beer you thought you liked and found it unexpectedly flat or nasty, you’re familiar with the concept. Discovering you’re sipping a skunky lager or hop-less IPA is as disheartening to the brewer as it is to the consumer, according to 4 Hands brewery manager Martin Toft.

“After (the drink-by date), the beer isn’t going to be bad for you or unsafe to drink, it’s just not going to be the same beer that we want the consumers to drink,” Toft said.

That IPA you saved for a special occasion? Celebrate soon. In general, hoppy beers like IPAs and American pale ales should be consumed as soon as possible and definitely within two to three months.

“Those really bright, vibrant hop aromas will fall off, and it can start to get cardboard-y, sometimes kind of cheesy is another descriptor for old hops – a lot of really unpleasant flavors and aromas,” Toft said. “All those really pungent, citrusy, fruity, tropical flavors and aromas you find in IPAs, those are the ones that fall off the fastest.”

Less hop-forward styles with lower ABVs like Pilsners and blond ales can hold out a little longer, Toft said, but no more than six months. Sours and robust, high-gravity stouts can cellar quite nicely for years in the right conditions, but be warned – you may lose delicate flavor notes like vanilla and coffee.

“There are a lot of beers that cellar well, which means that they aren’t going to age as rapidly as other styles, but we put that beer in package because we wanted you to drink it right away,” Toft said.

Bottom line: Drink up. “If it’s in that bottle, it’s in there for a reason.”

 

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Guide to Beer 2017: Spring Forecast

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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This spring, several of my favorite breweries are hitting St. Louis with fun releases – some brand new, others making a return appearance, all highly anticipated.

 

Just Released
1. Left Hand Brewing Co. Well Played

Although known for its nitro beers, don’t deny a try of this carbed-up red IPA. Expect a sweet, malty front ridden out by a nice clean, bitter finish, all while boasting a bouquet of experimental hops from the Yakima Valley.

2. Logboat Brewing Co. Bennie Mocha Stout
And another hit from the guys out of Columbia, Missouri. Massive coffee aroma is paired with cocoa nib sweetness up front, balanced by Fretboard Coffee bitterness in this roasty, medium-bodied stout.

Early March
3. Narrow Gauge Brewing Co. Peach OJ Run Imperial IPA and Pineapple Mordecai APA

STL’s best hazy pale ales are seeing fruit for more dank and tropical juiciness in your glass. Look for these bad boys from Florissant this month.

March
4. Oskar Blues Brewery Hotbox Coffee IPA

If combining two of my favorite things isn’t heaven, I don’t know what is. This Simcoe-hopped IPA meets its match with the fruity nature of Hotbox Roasters’ Ethiopian coffee bean. Weird? Absolutely. Tasty? Most definitely.

Late March
5. Mark Twain Brewing Co. Abracapocus

If you take a well-done base saison and add 100 pounds of peaches, what do you get? A little grain; a grassy, peppery yeast expression; and a whole lot of juicy peach. Catch this small batch release at the brewery while you can.

April
6. Earthbound Beer Cardamom Pepper Tea Blonde

This annual release is brewed with cracked cardamom pods, black pepper and Lipton’s black tea. It’s refreshing enough to journey into spring, and spicy enough to carry those last cool days of winter.

 

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DTWE: 6 STL coffee beers to drink this weekend

Friday, February 24th, 2017

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It’s that time of year again: Good Beer Hunting’s annual Uppers & Downers festival, a celebration of all things coffee beers. As I head back to Chicago to partake in this festival of my two favorite things, you should take an adventure down Manchester Avenue from Maplewood to The Mississippi and try the plethora of coffee beers available from some outstanding breweries.

Start your coffee beer exploit at Side Project Brewing. Nestled amongst the cozy walls of barreled funk, you’ll find Cory King and Co.’s newest project, Shared Brewing. Try a pour of Shared Coffee Shop Vibes: a rich, silky Russian Imperial stout that was finished on Colombian coffee beans from local roaster, Sump. It boasts loads of chocolate and coffee notes with a soft, underlying raisin character.

Next, walk east a few blocks to Schlafly Bottleworks for a quick Schlafly Coffee Stout (my favorite seasonal release coming out of St. Louis, but faithful readers knew that already) or the deliciously deceptive Double Bean Blonde Ale. Despite its yellow straw hue, it boasts aromas and flavors reminiscent of chocolate-covered coffee beans.

Continue down Manchester and into the The Hill neighborhood for a pit stop at 2nd Shift Brewing. This weekend, these cool cats debut Coffee Cat Spit Stout: a chewy oatmeal milk stout with the brightness and sweetness of Blueprint’s Peruvian Cajamarca cold toddy.

Finally, end your coffee beer journey at 4 Hands Brewing Co. with a Bonafide Imperial stout brewed with Edwardsville-based Goshen Bonafide coffee and vanilla beans or a Devil’s Invention, a coffee stout that’s crushable despite the 7.2-percent ABV. Get your buzz on this weekend.

 

Katie Herrera is tasting room manager at The Side Project Cellar and co-founder of Femme Ferment.

 

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